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  • #16
    Originally posted by Rich the Giants fan View Post
    Reggie Jackson is a great, great player but also a serious egomaniac.
    I dont think Reggie Jackson is much of a saberstat guy either.
    "(Shoeless Joe Jackson's fall from grace is one of the real tragedies of baseball. I always thought he was more sinned against than sinning." -- Connie Mack

    "I have the ultimate respect for Whitesox fans. They were as miserable as the Cubs and Redsox fans ever were but always had the good decency to keep it to themselves. And when they finally won the World Series, they celebrated without annoying every other fan in the country."--Jim Caple, ESPN (Jan. 12, 2011)

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    • #17
      This sort of behavior isn't new for him. I don't completely disagree with his statement because I'm not a Jim Rice fan when it comes to his HoF induction.

      Blyleven seems to have garnered more appreciation only because for so long everyone was saying, "he should be a HoFer," yet they had forgotten why, as evidenced by his rank on BBRef's ELO rater. He is the 15th greatest pitcher of all time, according to this. Since he played for average teams, it seems some people think that he would have been so much greater if he played for big-name teams. Even so, I'm not a huge Blyleven fan and I wouldn't have been outraged if he was never inducted.

      Don Sutton owes his success to longevity and overall baseball attention. His numbers don't reflect all of the ravings I've heard from contemporaries. I still consider him a HoFer, though.
      "Allen Sutton Sothoron pitched his initials off today."--1920s article

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      • #18
        Originally posted by chicagowhitesox1173 View Post
        Reggie Jackson stated in a interview recently that he doesn't feel Bert Byleven, Jim Rice, Phil Neikro, Gary Carter, Kirby Puckett or Don Sutton should be in the Hall Of Fame. Seems strange he would say this about players he played against. I might be wrong but I think he said Andy Pettite will make the HOF and he ripped on Alex Rodriguez and Barry Bonds saying something along the lines that no hofers will show up if they get elected. I wonder why he left Bruce Sutter off?

        I heard this on the radio so I might not be 100 percent acurrate.
        I find it odd that Reggie would mention Phil Niekro since I don't think Reggie ever faced Phil Niekro until Niekro was 45 years old in 1984. Niekro was selected to five NL All-Star teams but never faced Reggie in an All-Star Game. Given that Niekro spent most of his career in the NL and Reggie was a career AL guy I doubt Reggie saw Niekro pitch much.
        Strikeouts are boring! Besides that, they're fascist. Throw some ground balls - it's more democratic.-Crash Davis

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        • #19
          Originally posted by Honus Wagner Rules View Post
          I find it odd that Reggie would mention Phil Niekro since I don't think Reggie ever faced Phil Niekro until Niekro was 45 years old in 1984. Niekro was selected to five NL All-Star teams but never faced Reggie in an All-Star Game. Given that Niekro spent most of his career in the NL and Reggie was a career AL guy I doubt Reggie saw Niekro pitch much.
          I could be wrong but I think the article said Reggie went 1 for 19 against Neikro.
          "(Shoeless Joe Jackson's fall from grace is one of the real tragedies of baseball. I always thought he was more sinned against than sinning." -- Connie Mack

          "I have the ultimate respect for Whitesox fans. They were as miserable as the Cubs and Redsox fans ever were but always had the good decency to keep it to themselves. And when they finally won the World Series, they celebrated without annoying every other fan in the country."--Jim Caple, ESPN (Jan. 12, 2011)

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          • #20
            Originally posted by Honus Wagner Rules View Post
            I find it odd that Reggie would mention Phil Niekro since I don't think Reggie ever faced Phil Niekro until Niekro was 45 years old in 1984. Niekro was selected to five NL All-Star teams but never faced Reggie in an All-Star Game. Given that Niekro spent most of his career in the NL and Reggie was a career AL guy I doubt Reggie saw Niekro pitch much.
            Or maybe he was just bitter. According to B-R.com, he faced him 22 times and was 1-for-17 with 5 walks. Against Blylevin in 140 career PA, he had a .214/.264/.397 slash line, and in 55 PA against Sutton he posted a .261/.382/.435 line.

            Reggie Jackson is an obnoxious blowhard.
            San Francisco Giants, World Series Champions in 2010, 2012, and 2014!!!

            "Not everything that counts can be counted, and not everything that can be counted counts" ~ Albert Einstein

            "Royals wear crowns, but Champions Kiss the Ring" ~ Jeremy Affeldt

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            • #21
              Originally posted by Rich the Giants fan View Post
              Or maybe he was just bitter. According to B-R.com, he faced him 22 times and was 1-for-17 with 5 walks. Against Blylevin in 140 career PA, he had a .214/.264/.397 slash line, and in 55 PA against Sutton he posted a .261/.382/.435 line.

              Reggie Jackson is an obnoxious blowhard.
              Strikeouts are boring! Besides that, they're fascist. Throw some ground balls - it's more democratic.-Crash Davis

              Comment


              • #22
                Originally posted by chicagowhitesox1173 View Post
                He's also the ambassader or something in regards to the Yankees and he knows Arod is having a tough year and he actually thinks it's a good idea too bring this up now. He's friends with Alex Rodriguez too which makes this even more strange. No wonder Billy Martin, Thurman Munson and Craig Nettles didn't get along with him.
                I once read an article about one of the players from the Swingin' A's (I think it was Mike Epstein). He said that contrary to popular belief that team got along pretty well. The only player who constantly had problems with his teammates was Reggie Jackson. Of course, Epstein didn't play for the '73 or '74 teams, so maybe things got worse after he left.
                Baseball Junk Drawer

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                • #23
                  as compared to womanizing drunk glutton ruth and racist cobb who were shining examples of class

                  Originally posted by GiambiJuice View Post
                  You're missing my point. Reggie is a deserving HOFer, but it's not like he's Babe Ruth or Ty Cobb. He had some real flaws in his game, so for him to call out other members for not being deserving of enshrinement is weak and classless.
                  1. The more I learn, the more convinced I am that many players are over-rated due to inflated stats from offensive home parks (and eras)
                  2. Strat-O-Matic Baseball Player, Collector and Hobbyist since 1969, visit my strat site: http://forums.delphiforums.com/GamersParadise
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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by ian2813 View Post
                    I once read an article about one of the players from the Swingin' A's (I think it was Mike Epstein). He said that contrary to popular belief that team got along pretty well. The only player who constantly had problems with his teammates was Reggie Jackson. Of course, Epstein didn't play for the '73 or '74 teams, so maybe things got worse after he left.
                    Yeah I bet there's alot of untold story's on how bad of a teammate he was but unlike Reggie most of his teammates chose the classier route.

                    This makes three different players/manager who he's attacked who cant defend themselves due to being laid to rest. There's no reason to say this unless maybe he's trying to garner attention for Jack Morris.
                    "(Shoeless Joe Jackson's fall from grace is one of the real tragedies of baseball. I always thought he was more sinned against than sinning." -- Connie Mack

                    "I have the ultimate respect for Whitesox fans. They were as miserable as the Cubs and Redsox fans ever were but always had the good decency to keep it to themselves. And when they finally won the World Series, they celebrated without annoying every other fan in the country."--Jim Caple, ESPN (Jan. 12, 2011)

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Originally posted by 9RoyHobbsRF View Post
                      as compared to womanizing drunk glutton ruth and racist cobb who were shining examples of class
                      Reading comprehension fail.
                      My top 10 players:

                      1. Babe Ruth
                      2. Barry Bonds
                      3. Ty Cobb
                      4. Ted Williams
                      5. Willie Mays
                      6. Alex Rodriguez
                      7. Hank Aaron
                      8. Honus Wagner
                      9. Lou Gehrig
                      10. Mickey Mantle

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                      • #26
                        By the way, I have read several sites that say Reggie Jackson has a 160 IQ

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by brett View Post
                          By the way, I have read several sites that say Reggie Jackson has a 160 IQ
                          Don't they usually say or isn't it generally Reggie that says Reggie has a 160 IQ.

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by brett View Post
                            By the way, I have read several sites that say Reggie Jackson has a 160 IQ
                            True, and as one poster mentioned, Reggie is a very complex guy, and as still another poster mentioned he is an egomaniac. It would help to have a number on his egomania. Reggie has always owned one of the largest egos in all of sports.

                            Bitterness is probably the real issue, over his performance on the field and over who-knows-what between himself and these individuals.

                            BTW, I would agree with him on some of the names on his list, even if I wouldn't acknowledge that to him personally.
                            Catfish Hunter, RIP. Mark Fidrych, RIP. Skip Caray, RIP. Tony Gwynn, #19, RIP

                            A fanatic is someone who can't change his mind and won't change the subject. -- Winston Churchill. (Please take note that I've recently become aware of how this quote applies to a certain US president. This is a coincidence, and the quote was first added to this signature too far back to remember when).

                            Experience is the hardest teacher. She gives the test first and the lesson later. -- Dan Quisenberry.

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by brett View Post
                              By the way, I have read several sites that say Reggie Jackson has a 160 IQ
                              "Out of what? A thousand?" - Mickey Rivers on hearing ex- New York Yankee teammate Reggie Jackson brag about having an IQ of 160

                              That was c/o the August 20, 1979 issue of SI.

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Originally posted by abolishthedh View Post
                                True, and as one poster mentioned, Reggie is a very complex guy, and as still another poster mentioned he is an egomaniac. It would help to have a number on his egomania. Reggie has always owned one of the largest egos in all of sports.

                                Bitterness is probably the real issue, over his performance on the field and over who-knows-what between himself and these individuals.

                                BTW, I would agree with him on some of the names on his list, even if I wouldn't acknowledge that to him personally.
                                This is an article from the New York Times prior to his falling out with the Boss. I too believe he holds alot of bitterness inside.

                                At Last, Jackson Is 'The Straw That Stirs the Drink'

                                New York Times

                                By DAVE ANDERSON

                                June 30, 1980

                                On the wooden picnic table in the middle of the New York Yankee clubhouse, there is always a red cardboard box containing a dozen baseballs. The balls are there to be autographed. One by one the players, the manager and the coaches stop by and sign them. When Reggie Jackson autographs one of those balls now, he writes his name and a tiny "44," his number, across the wide gap between two loops of red seams. As much as anything else, the location of his signature on the autographed balls attests to his new stature as the undisputed symbol of the Yankees.

                                Traditionally that wide gap is reserved for a team's dominant personality - usually the manager, occasionally a player. In recent years, Billy Martin always signed the Yankee balls there. In other eras, Mickey Mantle, Joe DiMaggio and Babe Ruth did.

                                Not that Jackson took it upon himself to assume that heritage. When he sat down one day early in spring training to autograph a box of baseballs, Dick Howser, the new manager, was across the table. Howser had already signed several balls where, as a longtime Yankee coach, he always had - under a loop of seams. Now the manager noticed Jackson searching for somewhere to sign.

                                "Sign it in the middle," Howser suggested. "Aren't you signing it there?" Jackson asked. "No, you sign it there," Howser told him. Jackson was surprised but flattered. Only baseball's best players have been permitted to upstage their manager and teammates by autographing a baseball in that wide gap. In his time, Jackson knew, that's where Henry Aaron and Willie Mays signed the balls. So did Frank Robinson and Al Kaline. And now, for the first time in his celebrated and controversial career, the Yankees' cleanup hitter signs there. "But," he says, "I always sign the balls after Howser does, so he has the opportunity to sign there if he wants to."

                                His thoughtful respect for the new manager is an indication of the tranquility that surrounds Jackson now, after three seasons of turbulence. From the beginning of his Yankee career in 1977, he and Billy Martin, the manager then, resembled two cats arching their backs at each other in an alley. Now Martin is gone, dismissed by the Yankees for having punched a marshmallow salesman.

                                Shortly after his arrival, Jackson alienated Thurman Munson by bragging that "I'm the straw that stirs the drink." That verbal dagger opened a wound in the Yankee captain that never completely healed. Now Munson is gone, killed last summer in the crash of his private jet.

                                During his first three Yankee seasons, Jackson was judged by many Yankee fans to be a noisy intruder who, for all his World Series theatrics with the Oakland A's, had not earned his pinstripes. In addition to their loyalty to Munson, the fans revered other Yankees with established seniority and popularity - Jim (Catfish) Hunter, Roy White, Sparky Lyle, Mickey Rivers and Chris Chambliss. Now Hunter, White, Lyle, Rivers and Chambliss are gone, either retired or traded.

                                And now Reggie Jackson indeed is the straw that stirs the drink, the 6- foot, 205-pound slugger that stirs the crowd whenever he swaggers out of the on-deck circle and stomps up to swing his black bat. Once it was fashionable at Yankee Stadium to boo him. But last Tuesday night there, against the Boston Red Sox, he got a standing ovation after he had lifted a roof-high fly ball to right field with the bases loaded, ending the inning. Next time up he hit a tremendous home run into the right-center-field bleachers.

                                Although a pulled hamstring muscle kept him out of the starting lineup over the weekend, Jackson may return as the designated hitter in tonight's nationally televised game from Boston and add to these statisics: 18 homers, 46 runs batted in and a .284 average. With the Yankees dominating the American League East, he is an early candidate for the league's most-valuable-player award, which he won in 1973 with the A's.

                                "Some people thought I needed the controversy to do well," Jackson says, "but I always thought I could produce even more under calm conditions."

                                That's about as close as he comes to acknowledging that he is more comfortable this season with Martin not around. He and the current Oakland manager profess to be friends now, and maybe they are. But they are friends in the sense that a divorced couple are friends; if married, they would remain incompatible.

                                Another factor is that Jackson is now an established Yankee, not a stranger among his teammates as he was at first. Only six current Yankees have been on the team longer - Graig Nettles, Lou Piniella, Ron Guidry, Willie Randolph, Ed Figueroa and Fred Stanley.

                                To his new, young teammates, Jackson represents the Yankees now.

                                Some of them were not even in the organization when he was with the A's; they know him primarily as the Yankee who hit three home runs to win the final game of the 1977 World Series.

                                "He's awesome," says Rick Cerone, the new catcher. "He leads by example. He never loafs in the field. He plays hard. I really respect him."

                                Jackson sometimes turns that respect into a responsibility to counsel his developing young teammates. During the Red Sox series last week, he was seen scolding Bobby Brown for having stolen second base with only one out, Nettles at bat and himself on deck.

                                "If you go," he told the young center fielder, "you have to steal second every time, or it's a bad play." The next night Jackson was observed in a clubhouse huddle with Dennis Werth, the young utility man. "You let the pitcher throw the ball by you because you weren't concentrating," he said. " You can't do that." Jackson describes himself, however, as merely one of the Yankees' many leaders, not as the leader. "We've got a lot of leaders on this team," he says. "Guidry, Goose Gossage and Tommy John among the pitchers. Willie Randolph, he's the most mature young player I've ever seen. Nettles, Piniella and Bob Watson, each is a real pro."

                                Symbol, leader or celebrity, Jackson's stature stems from his ability to do what has always fascinated everyone in baseball, from the front office to the bleachers. He hits home runs.

                                On the Yankees, that has always been important. Babe Ruth popularized home runs. Lou Gehrig, Joe DiMaggio and Mickey Mantle embellished that appeal. And now Jackson is having his best year as a Yankee slugger. In his major league career, he has hit 387 homers - 20th on the career list. Al Kaline's total of 399 is his next objective. Some big-leaguers have no sense of baseball history or baseball records, but Jackson has studied the home-run list.

                                "Duke Snider is next, with 407," he says. "Yaz had 414 the last time I looked, and Billy Williams had 426, but then it thins out quickly. I know Stan Musial had 475 and Lou Gehrig had 493."

                                Jackson's ambition is to accumulate at least 500 homers, a long way from Henry Aaron's record of 755 but a more reasonable goal for someone who turned 34 years old last month. As a hitter he compares himself to two other left- handed sluggers - Willie McCovey, about to retire from the San Francisco Giants, and Willie Stargell, the first baseman and father figure of the Pittsburgh Pirates.

                                "They hit the ball to left field with great power, like I do," he says. "They hit the ball extremely hard and very long." Don Zimmer, the Red Sox manager, prefers to compare Jackson to Duke Snider, Zimmer's Dodger teammate in Brooklyn and Los Angeles. "Reggie and Duke got their home-run swing every time they took a cut," Zimmer says. "Not many hitters do that over their career. Not even Henry Aaron did it. Early in his career Aaron went to the opposite field a lot. Frank Robinson would hit the ball anywhere, too. Willie Mays didn't get cheated much. But even with two strikes and no balls Reggie always takes his big swing, like Duke did."

                                During the next several months, Jackson will take another big swing, this one at the Yankee treasury. His current five-year contract, for nearly $2.7 million, expires after the 1981 season.

                                "I've asked George Steinbrenner," he says of the Yankees' principal owner, "at his convenience, any time now through December, if we can sit down and get it out of the way before spring training starts next year. I don't want it to linger if I can help it. I don't want it to turn into a public thing. I'd like a four-year extension, but I'll listen to three years, and I'll listen to five years."

                                But when he is asked how much money he will seek, he smiles and says, "Not as much as you might think" -- whatever that means. Unless the approaching contract negotiations dissolve into a bitter and unresolved dispute, Jackson appears likely to remain a Yankee for the remainder of his career. In other years, he often complained that he had made a mistake in signing with the Yankees, that he would have been more comfortable if he had joined the San Diego Padres or the Montreal Expos, two other teams that pursued him when he became a free agent after the 1976 season. But much of that complaining occurred when Martin was the manager. Jackson now appears happy to be a Yankee - the only actual New York Yankee. Because of northern New Jersey's proximity to the stadium, virtually all the other Yankees live across the Hudson River in suburban homes or apartments. Jackson resides in an expensive Fifth Avenue apartment that overlooks Central Park.

                                "I live in the city mainly because of my businesses," he explains. "I' m near Murjani jeans, near ABC, near Remco toys and near Getty Oil, and it's also easy for me to flip up to Elmsford, where Spalding is, or flip over to Secaucus, where Panasonic is. I'd rather live in Connecticut, but I think it's important that the people in the city should see me."

                                Not long ago Jackson was too visible. Three shots were fired at him, allegedly by a Manhattan resident named Angel Viera, after a dispute on East 83d Street following an extra-inning night game at Yankee Stadium that Jackson had won with a homer. But last Tuesday, while walking along Madison Avenue, he heard a screech of brakes as an automobile knocked down a middle-aged woman. He hurried to her.

                                "She was visiting here from Germany," he says. "She was scared. I held her hand and told her not to be frightened, because I'm Reggie Jackson and everybody in the city knows me. I stayed with her until the police and the ambulance came."

                                More than most people, Jackson has an instinct for being where things are happening, for better or for worse. During the recent baseball labor problems, in which a player strike was averted at the last hour, he was one of the most visible members of the players' negotiation committee and, despite his high salary, one of the most vocal in supporting a strike.

                                "I've had a lot of players thank me for that," he says. "They respect me for that." Respect is important for Jackson, who drives a silver-and-blue Rolls-Royce Corniche to and from Yankee Stadium now. His first year as a Yankee he had a Rolls, but he purchased a Volkswagen just to drive it to the ball park in order to save the Rolls from being scratched and dented by the enthusiastic fans who surrounded whatever car he was in. But now he drives the Rolls, and whenever he glides out of the players' parking lot the fans part politely.

                                "I don't drive the Rolls to show off," he says. "I drive it because I've earned it. I remember when Joe DiMaggio was a coach with the A's, he had a friend who had a Cadillac and a Corvette, and I told Joe that one of these days I'd like to have a Cadillac and a Corvette, and he told me that if I stuck with it one day I would. Now I have the Rolls. But I didn't buy it until I'd taken care of my family and my own security first. That's what I mean by earning it."

                                Now he is earning his niche in Yankee history. "I don't know where I fit in Yankee history yet," he says. "Right now that's hard to say. Eventually it will depend on how many numbers I put up on the board, and it will depend how the team plays around me."

                                Spoken like a slugger whose teammates sign baseballs around his autograph.

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