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  • this could be the first...

    ...time in 30 years that the MLB champion comes out of the NL 3 times in a row. last time was in 1982 (cards won after dodgers and phillies).
    in the same time frame the AL did the threepeat 3 times.

    very surprising considering anyone was talking about the superiority of the AL during the 2000s. of course I know that the series is far from over and even if the giants win it is still just 3 short series. but still amazing how rare the threepeat of the NL is (well actually the chance is 12.5% given a 50-50 matchup but still the AL threepeats beat that by a lot over the last 30 years).
    I now have my own non commercial blog about training for batspeed and power using my training experience in baseball and track and field.

  • #2
    the NL has also won 3 straight ASG after losing 13 in a row
    1. The more I learn, the more convinced I am that many players are over-rated due to inflated stats from offensive home parks (and eras)
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    • #3
      Originally posted by dominik View Post
      very surprising considering anyone was talking about the superiority of the AL during the 2000s.
      No matter who wins, the AL is still quite dominant due to how the AL dominates interleague play. A sample size of seven games between just two teams is quite meaningless. The "superiority of the AL" doesn't mean that the ALCS winner is better than the NLCS winner - it just means that overall the AL is better than the NL.

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      • #4
        Actually the NL won four straight World Series from 1979-1982. The Pirates won in 1979.
        Strikeouts are boring! Besides that, they're fascist. Throw some ground balls - it's more democratic.-Crash Davis

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Honus Wagner Rules View Post
          Actually the NL won four straight World Series from 1979-1982. The Pirates won in 1979.
          I missed that.

          but still my statement is correct
          I now have my own non commercial blog about training for batspeed and power using my training experience in baseball and track and field.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by ipitch View Post
            No matter who wins, the AL is still quite dominant due to how the AL dominates interleague play. A sample size of seven games between just two teams is quite meaningless. The "superiority of the AL" doesn't mean that the ALCS winner is better than the NLCS winner - it just means that overall the AL is better than the NL.
            All-time .525 - dominant? Not in my book.

            This year - .559 - ok, pretty good
            2011 - .520 (10 games over .500) - dominant? No
            2010 - .532 - I wouldn't call that dominant
            2009 - .534 - not exactly dominant either

            If you want to say they dominate, I'd say the W% better be over .600. Being between 10-30 games over .500 out of 250 doesn't scream domination to me.

            Yes, the AL wins more than they lose, but ultimately the goal isn't to have more regular season wins (or even more all-star wins).
            San Francisco Giants, World Series Champions in 2010, 2012, and 2014!!!

            "Not everything that counts can be counted, and not everything that can be counted counts" ~ Albert Einstein

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Rich the Giants fan View Post
              All-time .525 - dominant? Not in my book.

              This year - .559 - ok, pretty good
              2011 - .520 (10 games over .500) - dominant? No
              2010 - .532 - I wouldn't call that dominant
              2009 - .534 - not exactly dominant either

              If you want to say they dominate, I'd say the W% better be over .600. Being between 10-30 games over .500 out of 250 doesn't scream domination to me.

              Yes, the AL wins more than they lose, but ultimately the goal isn't to have more regular season wins (or even more all-star wins).
              Well, you have very high standards if it takes .600 to be dominant. Only 1 out of the last 10 teams in the World Series won 60% of their regular season games.

              The AL has beaten the NL in interleague play for 9 straight years. If the Giants beat the Yankees 9 straight games (no matter what the scores were), wouldn't you say they have dominated the Yankees?

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              • #8
                .525 ball isn't exactly scorching, but 9 straight years on top? You can't ignore that... Pretty solid, and certainly the better league.
                "Herman Franks to Sal Yvars to Bobby Thomson. Ralph Branca to Bobby Thomson to Helen Rita... cue Russ Hodges."

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                • #9
                  Considering the whole league the AL certainly was stronger. but don't forget that the NL really had a lot of poor teams over the last decade. the AL had some weak teams too but not as many and rarely as bad as the NL (which also has 2 teams more). The AL is generally more balanced often with 3 teams per division being in contention. the have an occasional 100 loss team too but in the NL it's nearly standard for a last place team to lose 100.

                  I guess if you just compare IL games of top5 teams in that given year the IL record might not be as brutal (but I don't really know).
                  Last edited by milladrive; 10-28-2012, 12:58 PM.
                  I now have my own non commercial blog about training for batspeed and power using my training experience in baseball and track and field.

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                  • #10
                    The NL's good fortune in recent years can be traced directly to the renewed emphasis on pitching. Whether it has been a result of testing for PEDs or not, once pitchers reestablish the old mantra that good pitching stops good hitting, then the mantra will be evident in the postseason as well as the regular season.
                    Catfish Hunter, RIP. Mark Fidrych, RIP. Skip Caray, RIP. Tony Gwynn, #19, RIP

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                    Experience is the hardest teacher. She gives the test first and the lesson later. -- Dan Quisenberry.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by StanTheMan View Post
                      .525 ball isn't exactly scorching, but 9 straight years on top? You can't ignore that... Pretty solid, and certainly the better league.
                      It's going to be interesting to see what having the Astros, a team with a recent history of poor play, does to change the balance in interleague play. It's possible it might not have an effect at all, it might also level the field.
                      If evolution is outlawed, only outlaws will evolve!

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