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If there is another single season home run race?

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  • Captain Cold Nose
    replied
    Originally posted by White Knight View Post
    A healthy Mario Lemieux in his prime would challenge that statement.
    When Gretzky and Edmonton came to the NHL, it was nearly a decade before Super Mario. And, yes, Gretzky dominated at a level when he came in that even surpassed what Lemieux did. Heck, he was still winning scoring titles after Lemiuex had entered the league and Gretzky had moved on to LA. The Kings were nowhere near the powerhouse the Oilers were when Gretzky played in Edmonton. He shattered records almost like Ruth shattered records. That doesn't necessarily mean he was better than Lemieux, though.

    It will take someone that special to break the official home run record again.

    Leave a comment:


  • SamtheBravesFan
    replied
    Originally posted by Phantom Dreamer View Post
    I don't know much about hockey, but Gretzky was considered a finesse player, while home runs are associated with brute strength, for the most part.
    It mostly takes finnese and precision to score goals. The "power" ones come from slapshots.

    Leave a comment:


  • White Knight
    replied
    Originally posted by RubeWaddell19 View Post
    I'm just comparing the perception of the records. The single-season goal record was 76, set by Phil Esposito. That record was considered a bit of a fluke because Espo got "cheap" goals. Opposing defenses were petrified of a teammate named Bobby Orr. Many experts felt the record couldn't be broke. Wayne Gretzky was just that much better than anyone who played the game. He also played on an exceptional team, with many scoring threats. It would take the same circumstances to have a shot at 74 homers. An exceptional player in a small stadium with a stacked lineup at a time with mediocre pitching.
    A healthy Mario Lemieux in his prime would challenge that statement.

    Leave a comment:


  • RubeWaddell19
    replied
    I'm just comparing the perception of the records. The single-season goal record was 76, set by Phil Esposito. That record was considered a bit of a fluke because Espo got "cheap" goals. Opposing defenses were petrified of a teammate named Bobby Orr. Many experts felt the record couldn't be broke. Wayne Gretzky was just that much better than anyone who played the game. He also played on an exceptional team, with many scoring threats. It would take the same circumstances to have a shot at 74 homers. An exceptional player in a small stadium with a stacked lineup at a time with mediocre pitching.

    Leave a comment:


  • dominik
    replied
    since it seems like we are experiencing the start of another relatively low scoring era I think it is quite unlikely that we will see another 60 soon.

    this year the leader only hit 44 HRs in the AL. I think even 50 HR seasons will become rarer (but still happen-but not every year like in the early 00s).

    Leave a comment:


  • Phantom Dreamer
    replied
    I don't know much about hockey, but Gretzky was considered a finesse player, while home runs are associated with brute strength, for the most part.

    Leave a comment:


  • RubeWaddell19
    replied
    If you would have told anyone associated with Hockey that the single-season goal record would be topped by 16, you would have been laughed at. A player could come along, like Wayne Gretzky, with a ridiculous amount of talent that will make a mockery of the record book. And do it without chemical assistance.

    Leave a comment:


  • PlanetZoltan
    replied
    Originally posted by Cowtipper View Post
    But if Roger Maris can hit 61, then perhaps it isn't so unlikely after all...
    But still pretty unlikely.

    Leave a comment:


  • Cowtipper
    replied
    Originally posted by Zoltan View Post
    If the Babe, the Mick, Willie Mays, or Hank Aaron couldnt do it, nobody can.
    But if Roger Maris can hit 61, then perhaps it isn't so unlikely after all...

    Leave a comment:


  • Phantom Dreamer
    replied
    Nobody is challenging Bonds' record unless a team moves to San Antonio and plays its home games in the Alamodome, with its 305' right-center power alley. There, I could see a player breaking that record and perhaps hit 80-100, PED-free.
    Last edited by Phantom Dreamer; 01-07-2013, 02:38 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • White Knight
    replied
    Originally posted by pheasant View Post
    Rickey was maybe 5'9" and he crouched. His strike zone wasn't much bigger than Eddie Gaedel's. And the hitters behind Trout are more dangerous, especially a top 10 all time hitter called Pujols.
    In your opinion.

    Leave a comment:


  • pheasant
    replied
    Originally posted by GiambiJuice View Post
    Rickey Henderson was an automatic double who led off and he got walked a TON.
    Rickey was maybe 5'9" and he crouched. His strike zone wasn't much bigger than Eddie Gaedel's. And the hitters behind Trout are more dangerous, especially a top 10 all time hitter called Pujols.

    Leave a comment:


  • Ben Grimm
    replied
    Originally posted by Cap78 View Post
    According to wade boggs, this will never happen again
    As the game's set up today, there's no way somebody hits .400 anytime soon IMO.

    Leave a comment:


  • Cap78
    replied
    Originally posted by Francoeurstein View Post
    Who knows what baseball will evolve to down the road? 50 years from now it could be commonplace for a hitter to hit .400.
    According to wade boggs, this will never happen again

    Leave a comment:


  • UnderPressure
    replied
    Originally posted by GiambiJuice View Post
    I don't think so. As a clean player, he's only topped 35 home runs once. He's more of an all-fields hitter with power. He hits a ton of singles and doubles.


    Hey, I'm just using one of his own quotes.

    Leave a comment:

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