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RIP Stan "The Man" Musial

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  • RIP Stan "The Man" Musial

    http://sports.yahoo.com/news/cardina...7093--spt.html

    Goodbye to one of the greatest hitters the game ever saw...RIP.
    "Ya Gotta Believe!" -Tug McGraw ... "How we deal with death is at least as important as how we deal with life." -James T. Kirk ... "When you have eliminated the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth." -Sherlock Holmes ... "It is out of the deepest depth that the highest must come to its height." -Friedrich Nietzsche ... "There are more things in heaven and earth, Horatio, than are dreamt of in your philosophy." Hamlet

  • #2
    Sad day for baseball. RIP Mr. Musial.
    "(Shoeless Joe Jackson's fall from grace is one of the real tragedies of baseball. I always thought he was more sinned against than sinning." -- Connie Mack

    "I have the ultimate respect for Whitesox fans. They were as miserable as the Cubs and Redsox fans ever were but always had the good decency to keep it to themselves. And when they finally won the World Series, they celebrated without annoying every other fan in the country."--Jim Caple, ESPN (Jan. 12, 2011)

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    • #3
      Rest in peace, Stan.

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      • #4
        Musial had 1,815 hits at home and 1,815 hits on the road. Unbelievable.

        The Ultimate Baseball Look

        Modern Synthetic Baseball Fields

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        • #5
          One of baseball's true class acts.
          I've tried 'em all, I really have, and the only church that truly feeds the soul, day in, day out, is the Church of Baseball.

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          • #6
            Maybe it's superstition, but it does have me worried...

            Two baseball greats passing on the same day...and they say these sort of celebrity/star deaths often occur in threes--who ELSE?

            Truly, though, Stan was so befitting his name..."The Man" indeed. I obviously never got to see him play (come to think of it, I don't know if I've ever seen any Stan Musial footage beside the odd clip in Ken Burns' documentary or like sources) but his legend precedes him for sure.
            "Ya Gotta Believe!" -Tug McGraw ... "How we deal with death is at least as important as how we deal with life." -James T. Kirk ... "When you have eliminated the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth." -Sherlock Holmes ... "It is out of the deepest depth that the highest must come to its height." -Friedrich Nietzsche ... "There are more things in heaven and earth, Horatio, than are dreamt of in your philosophy." Hamlet

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            • #7
              He was far and away my favorite ballplayer when I was growing up. I read a biography of him when I was a kid, so I was long familiar with his life story. I remember the day he got his 3000th hit, and also the day he retired. I hadn't known till I was reading a story about him today that his final hit, on his last AB, was a ball driven by a rookie 2B man who would later break his NL hit record: Pete Rose.

              Of all his accomplishments, one that had nothing to do with his prowess as a hitter remains perhaps the most remarkable: in his entire career, he was never ejected from a game.

              It's an over-used phrase, but I think it really applies here: they don't make 'em like this any more.

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              • #8
                New York Times obituary:
                http://www.nytimes.com/2013/01/20/sp...pagewanted=all
                The Mets have the best, smartest fans in baseball.

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                • #9
                  First Weaver, now Musial... Tough couple days for baseball... RIP to a true class act - Stan you'll be missed!
                  WAR? Prove it!

                  Trusted Traders: ttmman21, Dalkowski110, BoofBonser26, Kearns643, HudsonHarden, Extra Innings, MadHatter, Mike D., J.P., SShifflett

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                  • #10
                    Truly the winding down of an era. Musial was one of the last living all-time great superstars of the 1940s.
                    I see great things in baseball. It's our game - the American game.
                    - Walt Whitman

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                    • #11
                      There was no one like Stan the Man ever in baseball, and there may never be again. One of the greatest of all time on the field, one of the classiest gentlemen off the field. A Hall of Famer in all respects.
                      mjrbaseball

                         Now batting ... the center fielder ... number 7 ... Mickey ... Mantle ... number 7.  

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by jnakamura View Post
                        Truly the winding down of an era. Musial was one of the last living all-time great superstars of the 1940s.
                        The only one left off the top of my head is Yogi Berra.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Stolensingle View Post
                          The only one left off the top of my head is Yogi Berra.
                          or Willie Mays.
                          mjrbaseball

                             Now batting ... the center fielder ... number 7 ... Mickey ... Mantle ... number 7.  

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by mjrbaseball View Post
                            or Willie Mays.
                            Mays was a rookie in 1951.

                            Joe DiMaggio was the only player to win four WS in his first four years in the majors, but Musial came fairly close to duplicating it. He went to three WS in his first three years, winning two of them (including DiMag's first WS loss), and four in his first five years. But he didn't play in 1945, because he was in the armed forces, so he went to four WS in his first four years of playing, and won three of them.

                            Then no more WS for the rest of his career, but the year after his retirement, the Cards were back in the WS.

                            But if there was a blemish on his record, it was that he did not play well in the postseason. In I think 23 WS games, he hit only 1 HR and had just 6 RBI, with an average of around .240. And those three WS during WWII featured teams with many of their best players serving in the military, so he should have faced easier pitching.
                            Last edited by Stolensingle; 01-19-2013, 08:02 PM.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Stolensingle View Post
                              The only one left off the top of my head is Yogi Berra.
                              Berra, Bobby Doerr, Ralph Kiner, Red Schoendienst...not too many left.
                              I see great things in baseball. It's our game - the American game.
                              - Walt Whitman

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