Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

hardest pitch to hit in video game history

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • hardest pitch to hit in video game history

    obviously wakefields knuckle in mvp 04/05 has to crack the list.
    randy johnsons fb, and his wicked, wicked slider in any game around 99-01
    jeff fassero has this slider that cut and rose up somehow a few years back

  • #2
    Try hitting a change-up in 2K8

    Comment


    • #3
      Nolan Ryan's fastball in RBI baseball. Used right and mixed up with offspeed stuff, it was deadly. Too bad Houston's roster wasn't.

      Comment


      • #4
        Once you figured out the quirk in World Series Baseball for the Sega, the slider was absolutely unhittable.
        46 wins to match last year's total

        Comment


        • #5
          Triple Play 2000, Triple Play 2001, and Triple Play Baseball submarine knuckleballs for created players. Not possible to hit, and that was a hitter's game!
          "They put me in the Hall of Fame? They must really be scraping the bottom of the barrel!"
          -Eppa Rixey, upon learning of his induction to the Baseball Hall of Fame.

          Motafy (MO-ta-fy) vt. -fied, -fying 1. For a pitcher to melt down in a big game situation; to become like Guillermo Mota. 2. The transformation of a good pitcher into one of Guillermo Mota's caliber.

          Comment


          • #6
            Wakefield's knuckler was hard to hit at first in MVP, but once you got the timing down, it was pretty easy. And it's awesome in The Show, because you can just guess knuckler every time, and then just don't swing unless it's high and away (doesn't break as much from there), and it'll be a ball about 65% of the time. And then his fastball and curve are horrible, so you should have no trouble running up the score against him.

            I could never hit Robb Nen or Eric Gagne in MVP. And the changeups in The Show that look like they'll be right down the middle, but then suddenly drop, and they're a foot out of the zone.

            Comment


            • #7
              I haven't played a baseball video game in a long time, but I don't see how any pitch in any realistically simulated type game can be more difficult to hit than pitches in old games like RBI baseball, where you controlled the pitch with the controller and they weren't bound by the sort of normal movements that pitches make.

              I remember, as kids, (and drunk college students) we often enforced one curve ball per AB limits, violations resulted in a mandatory walk and the chugging of one penalty beer.
              THE REVOLUTION WILL NOT COME WITH A SCORECARD

              In the avy: AZ - Doe or Die

              Comment


              • #8
                Can't think of anything I couldn't hit. I find myself using a curve ball in the dirt to get online players swinging on MLB 2K8, the temptation is too great.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by digglahhh View Post
                  I haven't played a baseball video game in a long time, but I don't see how any pitch in any realistically simulated type game can be more difficult to hit than pitches in old games like RBI baseball, where you controlled the pitch with the controller and they weren't bound by the sort of normal movements that pitches make.

                  I remember, as kids, (and drunk college students) we often enforced one curve ball per AB limits, violations resulted in a mandatory walk and the chugging of one penalty beer.
                  I love throwing a wicked slider in RBI. Normal fastball, just break it onto or off of the plate. That and the slow curve can be absolutely devastating. John Tudor has some sick breaking stuff, IIRC.

                  And then there's the infamous double-curve in Baseball Stars.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    In my High Heat 2001 Sim League (which has realistic game physics, if not graphics), I actually had some pitchers with very difficult to hit stuff though nothing insane or unrealistic. However, here's a list of whom I feel has had the best stuff...
                    -Fastball: Steve Dalkowski (Topping off at 112 mph. If you faced him, you just put the bat on your shoulder and let his lack of control do the work for you.)
                    -Changeup: Stu Miller (Currently the Tigers closer, and his set-up man is flame-throwing southpaw Jonathan Sanchez. You have no sense of timing at all when facing Miller. Worse still, he throws his fastball as a "reverse changeup." Not much, and it's not a very good fastball...really, that's the pitch that hurts him when he gets hurt...but it can throw your timing off severely.)
                    -Curve: Joe McGinnity (Broke in all sorts of weird directions and was coming submarine. His fastball was hittable, though. By hittable, I mean you could mean you could single him to death.)
                    -Slider: Ryan Wagner (The Expos drafted him in the game and used him as a set-up man at first. In a bizarre parallel of real life, he was dealt to the Reds, but then picked up via free agency by the Expos again. His fastball/slider combo was actually kinda hittable if you had a lefty batter in there. Then they picked up Fernando Rodney and moved Wagner into a righty specialist type role. He threw about 85% sliders and good luck hitting those if you're a righty batter.)
                    -Sinker: Chet Brewer (Not exactly sure why, but Brewer's sinker actually behaved a bit like a cut fastball and broke in. It was different, and with him throwing a nasty fastball, 12-to-6 curve, and screwball, I could rarely pick it up. Mike Pelfrey and Lee Meadows also had great sinkers [and Meadows also threw a pretty confusing curve], but their other pitches somewhat limited them.)
                    -Screwball: Clint Brown (Because he throws it submarine. His sinker and curve are actually quite hittable and have caused him problems but the upside-down screwgie is so odd that I can usually get away with just throwing that pitch over and over. Carl Hubbell's screwball had a higher rating and he was a far better pitcher, but you knew what was coming.)
                    -Knuckler: Ed Willett or Pat Caraway (Again, more because they're thrown submarine than because of quality, though Willett *is* a very good starter. In terms of quality, the best knuckleball went to Hoyt Wilhelm, hands down. He was extremely difficult to hit, but you could make adjustments, at least.)
                    -Splitter: Bruce Sutter (Flat out nasty. But if you caught hold of one of his fastballs, you could hit him.)
                    -Forkball: Roy Face (He was actually a little streaky in the game, but when he was on, that forker was just unhittable.)
                    "They put me in the Hall of Fame? They must really be scraping the bottom of the barrel!"
                    -Eppa Rixey, upon learning of his induction to the Baseball Hall of Fame.

                    Motafy (MO-ta-fy) vt. -fied, -fying 1. For a pitcher to melt down in a big game situation; to become like Guillermo Mota. 2. The transformation of a good pitcher into one of Guillermo Mota's caliber.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Erik Bedard View Post
                      And then there's the infamous double-curve in Baseball Stars.
                      When I saw the title of the thread, first thing I tought of was "Hope no one has mentionned the infamous double curve in Baseball Stars". But I was beaten to the punch.

                      Really, I would have worded it that very same way. Great minds think alike, Érik
                      From now until the end of September, I'll be chronicling in real time on Twitter the 1946 season of the International league's Montréal Royals, when Jackie Robinson broke the color barrier in professional baseball. Check it out: https://twitter.com/Royals_46season

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        The easiset to hit was Allen Watson's fastball on "Tony Larussa Baseball 94" for Sega Genesis. It was a homer 90% of the time.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Juan Cruz in MLB 2007 The Show had the weirdest delivery. They have him throwing 95-98, so the ball comes out of nowhere.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Erik Bedard View Post
                            And then there's the infamous double-curve in Baseball Stars.
                            Thrown by one of the Lovely Ladies perhaps?

                            BB Stars Underhand.jpg BB Stars Logo.jpg
                            "Herman Franks to Sal Yvars to Bobby Thomson. Ralph Branca to Bobby Thomson to Helen Rita... cue Russ Hodges."

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              In Super Baseball Simulator 1.000 (a very, very bad early game) there was this pitch option called the FB that you had to invest skill points into in order to throw and had a random chance of "hanging" over the plate. I can only assume it's supposed to be a forkball because what it does is hit the dirt just before it crosses the plate. It was supposed to be a swing and miss pitch anyway.

                              Point is, you could manipulate the velocity and skill level of your pitchers, so I set his velocity down to the minimum on a specialty Forkballer who threw 40 MPH couldn't throw anything but straight. The computer's hitters would swing over that rolling FB three, four, five times before it actually got into the catcher's mitt. They WOULD always swing, and they COULD NOT hit. Only issue is that it would start hanging more and more as the pitcher tired. Still my little funkballer could strike out 15 in a game and I worked a no-hitter or two.

                              Baseball Mogul's pitch by pitch system has its kill pitches. If you're ahead in the count throw a good enough splitter away and no one will hit it, including you, and the computer often does a bad job laying off it If you've got a guy with a quality Sinker, Slider and Curveball and excellent Command it's going to be hard to stop him. Similarly with a guy with a good Knuckleball and a couple get-me-over pitches. Get ahead in the count and toss that sucker to the arm-side and nobody hits it..

                              Comment

                              Ad Widget

                              Collapse
                              Working...
                              X