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Sandberg or Biggio

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  • #16
    Never mind Biggio's HRs; he's got 265, and how many other 2b have even 250? Four -- Hornsby, Morgan, Kent, and Ryno.

    Biggio's 50-50 at worst for 3000 hits, which makes him a rock-solid lock. It looks like he'll go into next season probably needing 50-75 hits for the milestone.

    He's got over 600 doubles, which only 13 guys have done -- all are HOFers except Biggio, Cal Ripken (only a matter of time), and Pete Rose.

    He's got the modern HBP record (and will probably catch Hughie Jennings if he plays through 2007).

    He's played regularly at C, 2b, CF, and LF, making All-Star teams at C & 2b. (And I thought he got snubbed a bit in 2004; he had a really hot start in CF.)

    He's surely one of the most unique players ever; despite the fact that his numbers resemble Alomar's, stylistically, the only guy I can really compare him to is Rose, maybe. Hustling, multi-position scrapper. Pete hit much better for average, of course, and had more longevity (so far), but Biggio is more valuable in the field, is faster on the basepaths, and probably has a little more power.

    Above, I said I preferred Sandberg to Biggio (back in 2003). Ryne remains a longtime favorite, but at this point, I would change that preference and select Biggio. I think I'd take Biggio over Alomar too, although that's closer. (I think Biggio probably has the lowest peak.)
    Last edited by Cougar; 06-04-2006, 05:44 PM.

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    • #17
      What hurt Sandberg in the eyes of many was his sudden decline and retirement in 1994 (ostensibly because of a messy divorce in the offing). Sandberg came back in 1996 and had power, but he lost his ability to hit for average and wasn't the same player as he was before 1994.

      This episode not only cut down on Sandberg's career counting totals, it truncated his career, and caused him to go out on a down note, which seems to have been remembered more vividly than his bodacioius seasons, when he was a superstar without a weakness. At his best, Sandberg could do it all---hit, hit for power, run, throw, and field.
      "I do not care if half the league strikes. Those who do it will encounter quick retribution. All will be suspended and I don't care if it wrecks the National League for five years. This is the United States of America and one citizen has as much right to play as another. The National League will go down the line with Robinson whatever the consequences. You will find if you go through with your intention that you have been guilty of complete madness."

      NL President Ford Frick, 1947

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      • #18
        Sandberg versus Alomar

        Alomar was a great complementary player, but never carried his team. He was a Scottie Pippen, not a Michael Jordan. Alomar never had 200 hits or 100 walks in a season. 200HR, 1,100 RBIs, and 2,700 hits in 19 years of service (despite no full season in his last 4) may not be enough to get into the hall. Sandberg has an MVP. Sandberg led his team to the playoffs in 1984. Sandberg has the most errorless chances streak at 2nd base. He won an All-Star HR hitting contest. He won a HR crown in 1990. Alomar was a great player, but a hair below 'Berg in comparison.

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        • #19
          I'll take Sandberg by a healthy margin.

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          • #20
            Sandberg isn't near the offensive force as Alomar nor Biggio. He has to make it up on glove and he comes up just a little short of Biggio who is turn is a hair short of Alomar.

            Sandberg's MVP was one of the first ESPN promotional MVP's. He had a fine year but he was no Tim Raines.

            And I can't even bring myself to discuss the value of winning an ASG HR contest. Good Grief.
            Last edited by KCGHOST; 06-19-2006, 01:50 PM.
            Buck O'Neil: The Monarch of Baseball

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            • #21
              Originally posted by KCGHOST
              Sandberg isn't near the offensive force as Alomar nor Biggio. He has to make it up on glove and he comes up just a little short of Biggio who is turn is a hair short of Alomar.

              Sandberg's MVP was one of the first ESPN promotional MVP's. He had a fine year but he was no Tim Raines.

              And I can't even bring myself to discuss the value of winning an AG HR contest. Good Grief.
              Agreed. Sandberg, though a great player, benefitted heavily from playing at Wrigley Field.
              Strikeouts are boring! Besides that, they're fascist. Throw some ground balls - it's more democratic.-Crash Davis

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