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Rafael Palmeiro

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  • Rafael Palmeiro

    Here we go now...

    The Fuzzy Bear Memorial Keltner List: Rafael Palmeiro...

    1. Was he ever regarded as the best player in baseball? Did anybody, while he was active, ever suggest that he was the best player in baseball?

    He won TSN PoY in 1999. I'd assume that is a suggestion that he was the best player in baseball by a respected magazine. What do you guys think?

    2. Was he the best player on his team?

    Yes, according to BB-Ref. WAR he was the best overall player on the 1993 Rangers, possibly '91 and was their best position players in 1992. He was the best position player on the '95 O's and the best overall player for them in 1998. second in '24-26 & '30.

    3. Was he the best player in baseball at his position? Was he the best player in the league at his position?

    Yes, according to thebaseballgauge.com he was the best DH in '99, the best first baseman in all baseball in '91 & '95 and in the A.L. in '98.

    4. Did he have an impact on a number of pennant races?

    Yes, '93 & '99 with Texas and '96 & '97 with Baltimore.

    5. Was he a good enough player that he could continue to play regularly after passing his prime?

    Yes, I suppose '03-05 wold apply.

    6. Is he the very best player in baseball history who is not in the Hall of Fame?

    No

    7. Are most players who have comparable career statistics in the Hall of Fame?

    Yes...
    1. Frank Robinson (887.6) *
    2. Eddie Murray (885.2) *
    3. Albert Pujols (868.1)
    4. Ken Griffey Jr. (861.9) *
    5. Dave Winfield (836.9) *
    6. Reggie Jackson (825.6) *
    7. Gary Sheffield (821.2)
    8. David Ortiz (816.6)
    9. Mel Ott (814.1) *
    10. Manny Ramirez (790.0)
    8. Do the numbers meet Hall of Fame standards?

    On 5/7 counts...
    Black Ink
    Batting - 8 (299), Average HOFer ≈ 27
    Gray Ink
    Batting - 183 (53), Average HOFer ≈ 144
    Hall of Fame Monitor
    Batting - 178 (58), Likely HOFer ≈ 100
    Hall of Fame Standards
    Batting - 57 (47), Average HOFer ≈ 50
    JAWS
    First Base (12th):
    71.9 career WAR / 38.9 7yr-peak WAR / 55.4 JAWS
    Average HOF 1B (out of 21):
    66.8 career WAR / 42.7 7yr-peak WAR / 54.7 JAWS
    9. Is there any evidence to suggest that the player was significantly better or worse than is suggested by his statistics?

    Yes, he is a suspected PED user.

    10. Is he the best player at his position who is eligible for the Hall of Fame but not in?

    Yes, if we include PED users. Palmeiro has obviously unofficially excluded.

    11. How many MVP-type season did he have? Did he ever win an MVP award? If not, how many times was he close?

    This is where it gets interesting. His highest finishes were 5th, 6th & 8th. He won TSN PoY in 1999. He isn't lacking in seasonal numbers with averages around .300 with well over 30 & 40 HR's and between 100-150 RBI's. He has 6 seasons that fit the bill (8 if we count the two .273 averages). Those are traditionally MVP type seasons.

    12. How many All-Star-type seasons did he have? How many All-Star games did he play in? Did most of the other players who played in this many games get in?

    He is a 4x all-star but had 12-14 all-star type seasons.

    13. If this man were the best player on his team, would it be likely that the team could win the pennant?

    Yes, I think it's fair to say. But not as obvious as you'd think with the answer to 11 & 12.

    14. What impact did the player have on baseball history? We he responsible for any rule changes? Did he introduce any new equipment? Did he change the game in any way?

    He won a gold glove as a DH. The most ridiculous award in the history of professional sports.

    15. Did the player uphold the standards of sportsmanship and character that the Hall of Fame, in its written guidelines, instructs us to consider?

    PED's of course. I don't recall him being anything but a consummate professional. Until he made a mockery of himself and baseball in front of the supreme court and the entire country.
    Last edited by bluesky5; 01-10-2019, 06:04 PM.
    "No matter how great you were once upon a time — the years go by, and men forget,” - W. A. Phelon in Baseball Magazine in 1915. “Ross Barnes, forty years ago, was as great as Cobb or Wagner ever dared to be. Had scores been kept then as now, he would have seemed incomparably marvelous.”

  • #2
    I wouldn't. Not because of PEDs though–it's because he's not even the best 1Bman on the outside of the Hall looking in.

    I wouldn't call the finger-wagging while lying to Congress about PED use to be "consummately professional" either.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by pedrosrotatorcuff View Post
      I wouldn't. Not because of PEDs though–it's because he's not even the best 1Bman on the outside of the Hall looking in.

      I wouldn't call the finger-wagging while lying to Congress about PED use to be "consummately professional" either.
      He was by all accounts I remember a good dude. Doesn't mean he didn't use PED's. And by almost any measure he is the best first baseman outside the HoF.
      "No matter how great you were once upon a time — the years go by, and men forget,” - W. A. Phelon in Baseball Magazine in 1915. “Ross Barnes, forty years ago, was as great as Cobb or Wagner ever dared to be. Had scores been kept then as now, he would have seemed incomparably marvelous.”

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by bluesky5 View Post
        He was by all accounts I remember a good dude. Doesn't mean he didn't use PED's. And by almost any measure he is the best first baseman outside the HoF.
        again, lying to Congress under oath is a federal crime. he's lucky he didn't get prison time. that's not "being a good dude".

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by pedrosrotatorcuff View Post

          again, lying to Congress under oath is a federal crime. he's lucky he didn't get prison time. that's not "being a good dude".
          Fair enough, I amended #15.
          "No matter how great you were once upon a time — the years go by, and men forget,” - W. A. Phelon in Baseball Magazine in 1915. “Ross Barnes, forty years ago, was as great as Cobb or Wagner ever dared to be. Had scores been kept then as now, he would have seemed incomparably marvelous.”

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by bluesky5 View Post
            Fair enough, I amended #15.
            That's a good way of putting it.

            Comment

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