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Heinie Manush

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  • Heinie Manush

    Originally posted by TomBodet View Post
    Gene Tenace a Hof?! Mickey Tettleton better hear about this!

    The sons of Manush are Outraged.

    All you need to know @Madlock in the post season-'79, '85.
    The Sons of Manush ride again...

    The Fuzzy Bear Memorial Keltner List: Heinie Manush...

    1. Was he ever regarded as the best player in baseball? Did anybody, while he was active, ever suggest that he was the best player in baseball?

    No

    2. Was he the best player on his team?

    Yes, according to BB-Ref. he was the best overall player on the '28 Browns and '34 Senators. He was the best position player on the '29 Browns and was the best position player for Washington after being traded there June 13th.

    3. Was he the best player in baseball at his position? Was he the best player in the league at his position?

    Yes, according to thebaseballgauge.com he was the best LF in the A.L. in 1932.

    4. Did he have an impact on a number of pennant races?

    Yes, in 1924, '30, '33 & '35. He was also thrown out of game 3 of the '33 World Series in which he played poorly batting .111 over 5 games.

    5. Was he a good enough player that he could continue to play regularly after passing his prime?

    No, he had one good year, being the best hitter on the '37 Dodgers, in five years after his age 32 season in 1934.

    6. Is he the very best player in baseball history who is not in the Hall of Fame?

    N/A

    7. Are most players who have comparable career statistics in the Hall of Fame?

    Yes...
    1. Kiki Cuyler (892.9) *
    2. George Sisler (889.7) *
    3. Zack Wheat (871.3) *
    4. Joe Medwick (867.9) *
    5. Jimmy Ryan (860.0)
    6. Harry Heilmann (848.9) *
    7. Edd Roush (847.1) *
    8. Ed Delahanty (840.7) *
    9. Pie Traynor (839.6) *
    10. Roger Connor (837.6) *
    8. Do the numbers meet Hall of Fame standards?

    Calling it 3/7...
    Black Ink
    Batting - 15 (160), Average HOFer ≈ 27
    Gray Ink
    Batting - 142 (114), Average HOFer ≈ 144
    Hall of Fame Monitor
    Batting - 137 (100), Likely HOFer ≈ 100
    Hall of Fame Standards
    Batting - 46 (112), Average HOFer ≈ 50
    JAWS
    Left Field (33rd):
    45.8 career WAR / 34.7 7yr-peak WAR / 40.2 JAWS
    Average HOF LF (out of 20):
    65.4 career WAR / 41.6 7yr-peak WAR / 53.5 JAWS
    9. Is there any evidence to suggest that the player was significantly better or worse than is suggested by his statistics?

    No

    10. Is he the best player at his position who is eligible for the Hall of Fame but not in?

    N/A

    11. How many MVP-type season did he have? Did he ever win an MVP award? If not, how many times was he close?

    He finished 5th & 2nd for the League Awards given out from 1920-29 and 3rd back-to-back in '32 & '33 in the modern BBWAA awards begun in 1931. Had MVP shares in '37 too.

    12. How many All-Star-type seasons did he have? How many All-Star games did he play in? Did most of the other players who played in this many games get in?

    N/A

    13. If this man were the best player on his team, would it be likely that the team could win the pennant?

    Yes, I think it applies.

    14. What impact did the player have on baseball history? We he responsible for any rule changes? Did he introduce any new equipment? Did he change the game in any way?

    No

    15. Did the player uphold the standards of sportsmanship and character that the Hall of Fame, in its written guidelines, instructs us to consider?

    I don't recall him being anything but a consummate professional.
    Last edited by bluesky5; 01-11-2019, 12:08 AM.
    "No matter how great you were once upon a time — the years go by, and men forget,” - W. A. Phelon in Baseball Magazine in 1915. “Ross Barnes, forty years ago, was as great as Cobb or Wagner ever dared to be. Had scores been kept then as now, he would have seemed incomparably marvelous.”

  • #2
    Manush was close, but a bit too inconsistent for my liking. If a guy is washed up at age 32 he darn well better have mostly great years before that. Unfortunately, Manush's OPS+ scores were up and down; he had a 101 at age 23, a 105 at age 25, and another 105 at age 29. I think with good seasons those years instead of stinkers, he would be a solid HOFer.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by willshad View Post
      Manush was close, but a bit too inconsistent for my liking. If a guy is washed up at age 32 he darn well better have mostly great years before that. Unfortunately, Manush's OPS+ scores were up and down; he had a 101 at age 23, a 105 at age 25, and another 105 at age 29. I think with good seasons those years instead of stinkers, he would be a solid HOFer.
      Yea he famously could stink it up after a big season. '28-30 and '32-34 were consistent.
      "No matter how great you were once upon a time — the years go by, and men forget,” - W. A. Phelon in Baseball Magazine in 1915. “Ross Barnes, forty years ago, was as great as Cobb or Wagner ever dared to be. Had scores been kept then as now, he would have seemed incomparably marvelous.”

      Comment

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