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Elmer Flick: Oldest Living Hall Of Famer at time of election to the HOF

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  • Elmer Flick: Oldest Living Hall Of Famer at time of election to the HOF

    Elmer Flick (1876-1971; MLB: 1898-1910; HOF: 1963). Philadelphia Phillies (1898-1902) and Cleveland Indians (1902-1910) outfielder, Elmer flick holds the distinction of being the Oldest Living Hall Of Famer at the time of their election to the Hall Of Fame. Flick was 87 years old in 1963 and hadn't played in the major leagues for more than a half-century when he finally got the call that he was about to join baseball's elite in Cooperstown. Flick live almost eight more years after being elected to the HOF. He died at the age of 94 on January 9, 1971, two days before his 95th birthday. The small-town Ohio boy was born in Bedford,Ohio and he died there nearly 95 years later.
    In his youth, Flick produced some big major league numbers and garnered many excellent accomplishments. He led the American league in Triples three times for the Indians. As a Phillie, he led the National League in Runs Batted in with 110 RBI in 1900. Most of all, he was a consistent hitter, who led the American League in batting average in 1905 and in his 13 major league seasons he topped .300 eight time and hit between .295 and .299 three times, so he hit over .295 11 times in 13 years, had a caree high of .367 for the 1900 Phillies, and he finished with a career batting average of .313.

    What's interesting is that Flick's claim of being the oldest living player at the time of their election to the Hall Of Fame might be in danger. Maury Wills received 10 of 16 votes in the Golden Era vote in December 2014, missing election by two votes. Born October 2, 1932, the great base-stealing champion Wills turns 88 this October and he could receive enough votes this December to gain election and surpass Flick as the oldest player at the time of their election to the Hall Of Fame. Another interesting twist is that Flick was elected to the Hall Of Fame by the Veterans Committee, in the Winter in between the 1962 and 1963 seasons. At that time, Wills was coming off his greatest season as a base stealer, having swiped 104 bases in the 1962 season for the Dodgers, en route to a final total of 586 Stolen Bases, accompanied by 2,134 base hits.

    Wills may have not reached the Hall Of Fame thus far, because he hit only .281 for his career batting average and over 87% of his hits were singles, but he was among the very best bunters of his era and he was outstanding in the field, at Shortstop. His three best years for batting average were .302, 302, and.299, the last average coming in his historic 1962 season of being the first player to top100 Stolen Bases since the 19th Century (104 SB).

    Last edited by 1954 Phils; 02-13-2020, 07:39 PM.

  • #2
    Flick was an interesting personality. He was a perpetual malcontent - sometimes due to circumstances within his control and sometimes not. Wills should be in the HoF it's really a shame.
    "No matter how great you were once upon a time — the years go by, and men forget,” - W. A. Phelon in Baseball Magazine in 1915. “Ross Barnes, forty years ago, was as great as Cobb or Wagner ever dared to be. Had scores been kept then as now, he would have seemed incomparably marvelous.”

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    • #3
      [QUOTE=bluesky5;n3563609 Wills should be in the HoF it's really a shame.[/QUOTE]

      The last time his Era (1950-1969) was up for election here were the results:

      16 voters: 75% = 12 votes needed for election.

      No one was elected: Top vote getters: Richie 'Dick' Allen 11 votes (missed election by one vote); Tony Oliva 11 votes (missed election by one vote);
      Maury Wills 10 votes (missed election by 2 votes); Minnie Minoso 9 votes (missed election by 3 votes); Jim Kaat 8 votes (missed election by 4 votes). None of the other four player candidates
      (Luis Tiant, Billy Pierce, Ken Boyer and Gil Hodges received even 4 votes

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      • #4
        Originally posted by 1954 Phils View Post
        Wills may have not reached the Hall Of Fame thus far, because he hit only .281 for his career batting average and over 87% of his hits were singles, but he was among the very best bunters of his era and he was outstanding in the field, at Shortstop. His three best years for batting average were .302, 302, and.299, the last average coming in his historic 1962 season of being the first player to top100 Stolen Bases since the 19th Century (104 SB).
        Wills was also very disruptive on the base paths in an era where that was actually valued.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by 1954 Phils View Post

          The last time his Era (1950-1969) was up for election here were the results:

          16 voters: 75% = 12 votes needed for election.

          No one was elected: Top vote getters: Richie 'Dick' Allen 11 votes (missed election by one vote); Tony Oliva 11 votes (missed election by one vote);
          Maury Wills 10 votes (missed election by 2 votes); Minnie Minoso 9 votes (missed election by 3 votes); Jim Kaat 8 votes (missed election by 4 votes). None of the other four player candidates
          (Luis Tiant, Billy Pierce, Ken Boyer and Gil Hodges received even 4 votes
          He's 88 years old they need to just put him in the damn hall. It's going to be another Ron Santo situation. Wills has the stats and the narrative. If it wasn't for Pee Wee Reese and the deep Dodgers organization keeping him in the minors Wills would have been elected 35 years ago.
          "No matter how great you were once upon a time — the years go by, and men forget,” - W. A. Phelon in Baseball Magazine in 1915. “Ross Barnes, forty years ago, was as great as Cobb or Wagner ever dared to be. Had scores been kept then as now, he would have seemed incomparably marvelous.”

          Comment

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