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Home Run HoF Project: Year 7 - 1945

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  • Home Run HoF Project: Year 7 - 1945

    Home Run Hall of Fame

    Rules:
    • This is a hall of fame for home run hitters only.
    • We're going to induct position players yearly at the same rate as the actual HoF including the Negro Leagues. All halves will be rounded up.
    • In 1950, '60, '70, etc. we will elect one eligible pitcher, just for fun.
    • I'll close and open elections on Sunday mornings.
    • Players become eligible after being retired for five seasons including Gehrig, Clemente and alike.
    • You are not limited to the 25 career leaders I list. You may take anything or nothing into account - position, context, peak, longevity, clutch homers, but you need to keep it home run-centric. We are not taking slugging or doubles and triples or anything like that into consideration.
    • Players receive points inverted and doubled so...
    Example:
    1. Ruth - 8 points
    2. Gehrig - 6 points
    3. DiMaggio - 4 points
    4. Mantle - 2 points
    1945 Election - 3 Inductees: Ballots of 6
    (players retired after 1939 season or earlier)

    eligible career home run leaders:

    Lou Gehrig - 493 (led league 3x)
    Jim Bottomley - 219 (1x)
    Harry Heilmann - 183 (0x)
    Tony Lazzeri - 178 (0x)
    Chick Hafey - 164 (0x)
    Bob Meusel - 156 (1x)
    Bill Terry - 154 (0x)
    High Pockets Kelly - 148 (1x)
    Jack Fournier - 136 (1x)
    Travis Jackson - 135 (0x)
    Zack Wheat - 132 (0x)
    Kiki Cuyler - 128 (0x)
    Marty McManus - 120 (0x)
    Mickey Cochrane - 119 (0x)
    Jimmy Ryan - 118 (1x)
    Tilly Walker - 118 (1x)
    Ty Cobb - 117 (1x)
    Tris Speaker - 117 (1x)
    Bing Miller - 116 (0x)
    Lefty O'Doul - 113 (0x)
    Heinie Manush - 110 (0x)
    Jimmie Dykes - 108 (0x)
    Hugh Duffy - 106 (2x)
    Mike Tiernan - 106 (2x)
    Irish Meusel - 106 (0x)
    Frankie Frisch - 105 (0x)
    George Sisler - 102 (0x)
    Honus Wagner - 101 (0x)
    Ed Delahanty - 101 (2x)
    Cap Anson - 97 (0x)
    Sam Crawford - 97 (2x)

    career home run leaders:

    Lip Pike: 1872-79
    Charley Jones: 1880-81, '83-84
    Jim O'Rourke: 1882
    Harry Stovey: 1885-86, '89-94
    Dan Brouthers: 1887-88
    Roger Connor: 1895-1920
    Babe Ruth: 1921-present
    "No matter how great you were once upon a time — the years go by, and men forget,” - W. A. Phelon in Baseball Magazine in 1915. “Ross Barnes, forty years ago, was as great as Cobb or Wagner ever dared to be. Had scores been kept then as now, he would have seemed incomparably marvelous.”

  • #2
    1. Lou Gehrig
    2. Jim O'Rourke
    3. Hugh Duffy
    4. Sam Crawford
    5. Jim Bottomley
    6. High Pockets Kelly

    Comment


    • #3
      Code:
      1936                Team                     Pos.      career HR                          other   
      Harry Stovey        Philadelphia Athletics  1B/OF         122       held career record for 8 seasons, A.A. career leader
      Gavvy Cravath       Philadelphia Phillies     RF          119                  led the N.L. 6x in 7 seasons
      Home Run Baker      Philadelphia Athletics    3B           96        2 GW-HR in '11 world series, 4x consec. A.L. leader
      1937                Team                     Pos.      career HR                          other 
      Cy Williams         Philadelphia Phillies     CF          259         only deadball and live ball home run champion
      Roger Connor        New York Giants           1B          138                held career record for 23 years
      1938                Team                     Pos.      career HR                          other 
      Lip Pike            Atlantic                  CF           21          led league 4x, held career record for 8 years
      1939                Team                     Pos.      career HR                          other  
      Dan Brouthers       Detroit Wolverines        1B          107                 held career record for 2 years
      Ken Williams        St. Louis Browns          LF          196                   first 30/30 player in 1922
      Charley Jones       Cincinnati Reds           LF           54                 held career record for 4 years    
      Sam Thompson        Philadelphia Phillies     RF          126                   first 20/20 player in 1889
      Harry Davis         Philadelphia Athletics    1B           75                      led A.L. 4x in a row  
      1942                Team                     Pos.      career HR                          other 
      Babe Ruth           New York Yankees        P/COF         714                  revolutionized the home run
      1943                Team                     Pos.      career HR                          other 
      Hack Wilson         Chicago Cubs              CF          244          N.L. record 56 HR in '30, led 4x in 5 years
      Rogers Hornsby      St. Louis Cardinals       2B          301        first player with 40 HR and .400 average in '22
      Wildfire Schulte    Chicago Cubs              RF           92                    2x N.L. home run champ
      1944                Team                     Pos.      career HR                          other 
      Goose Goslin        Washington Senators       LF          248              top power hitter on 5 pennant winners
      Buck Freeman        Boston Americans          RF           82        first to lead both N.L. in 1899 and A.L. in 1903
      Ned Williamson      Chicago White Stockings   3B           67              held single-season record for 35 years
      Last edited by bluesky5; 03-29-2020, 11:18 AM.
      "No matter how great you were once upon a time — the years go by, and men forget,” - W. A. Phelon in Baseball Magazine in 1915. “Ross Barnes, forty years ago, was as great as Cobb or Wagner ever dared to be. Had scores been kept then as now, he would have seemed incomparably marvelous.”

      Comment


      • #4
        1. Gehrig
        2. Bottomley
        3. O'Rourke
        4. Crawford
        5. Delahanty
        6. Duffy

        Comment


        • #5
          1. Lou Gehrig
          2. Jim Bottomly
          3. Jim O'Rourke
          4. Tillie Walker
          5. Hugh Duffy
          6. Ed Delahanty

          Comment


          • #6
            I forgot about Tim Jordan. Doubt I'm going to vote for him. Probably would make this hall had he played in the live ball era when defense and contact hitting didn't matter so much.

            https://www.baseball-reference.com/p...ordati01.shtml
            "No matter how great you were once upon a time — the years go by, and men forget,” - W. A. Phelon in Baseball Magazine in 1915. “Ross Barnes, forty years ago, was as great as Cobb or Wagner ever dared to be. Had scores been kept then as now, he would have seemed incomparably marvelous.”

            Comment


            • #7
              1. Lou Gehrig
              2. Honus Wagner - I've decided to elevate him due to the huge dimensions of Exposition Park. I believe I'm correct in saying one home run ever cleared the fence.
              3. Mike Tiernan - I feel like I should have been giving him more love.
              4. Ed Delahanty
              5. Sam Crawford
              6. Hugh Duffy is getting the nod over O'Rourke.
              "No matter how great you were once upon a time — the years go by, and men forget,” - W. A. Phelon in Baseball Magazine in 1915. “Ross Barnes, forty years ago, was as great as Cobb or Wagner ever dared to be. Had scores been kept then as now, he would have seemed incomparably marvelous.”

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by bluesky5 View Post
                I forgot about Tim Jordan. Doubt I'm going to vote for him. Probably would make this hall had he played in the live ball era when defense and contact hitting didn't matter so much.

                https://www.baseball-reference.com/p...ordati01.shtml
                My last two slots were chosen from a short list of 6 or 7 players, including 2x HR leader Tim Jordan!

                Comment


                • #9
                  I think Wagner gets tremendously short changed by nearly everyone when it comes to slugging and home run power. His career numbers are a mirage because of where he played. They don't reflect his true power.

                  My primary source here is this amazing book: https://www.amazon.com/Ballparks-Dea.../dp/0786466251

                  1. Wagner played from 1900-June 29th 1909 in Exhibition Park, III.

                  Dimensions:

                  LF Line: 400
                  Short Left Field: 393
                  Left Center: 475
                  Center Field: 515
                  Right Center: 439
                  Short: Right Field 390
                  Right Field Line: 380

                  Only 108 home runs were hit inside the park during the entire time the Pirates played there.

                  ONE ball cleared the fence in nearly 10 seasons. Tim Jordan himself cleared the fence on 7/22/08. It was front page news in both Brooklyn and PIttsburgh.

                  2. Wagner played June 30th 1909 through the end of 1917 at Forbes Field.

                  Dimensions:

                  LF: 360
                  LC: 403
                  CF: 462
                  RC: 373
                  RF: 376

                  From mid 1909-1919, only 28 home runs were hit over the fence by all players. Only 2 were not hit down the lines, in the 45 degree triangle between LCF and RCF.

                  3. From 1900-1917 Wagner hit only 6 home runs over the fence in his home parks. Yet, he is the all time leader in home runs at South End Grounds III, where the Braves played from 1894-1914. He hit 21 home runs there, and all 21 cleared the fence.

                  4. Wagner has the second highest park and league adjusted Isolated Power (171) of all players who played from 1897-1917 (min 7500 PA). He's behind only Sam Crawford (185).

                  5. By the time the cork centered ball entered the league (starting in the 1910 World Series as an experiment), and then in Spring 1911, Wagner was 37 years old. He never had a shot at the cork centered ball, and he certainly never had a shot at baseball post 1919, with the jacked up ball, many fresh baseballs used per game, and all trick pitches banned (except for 14 pitchers who were grandfathered in).

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    1. Lou Gehrig
                    2. Mike Tiernan
                    3. Ed Delahanty
                    4. George Kelly
                    5. Harry Heilmann
                    6. Sam Crawford

                    just missed: Bottomley, Walker, Meusel

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      1. Gehrig
                      2. Delahanty
                      3. Crawford
                      4. Wagner- glad to see he is getting some recognition
                      5. Bottomley
                      6. O'Rourke

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        1. Lou Gehrig - 60 points
                        2. Ed Delahanty - 30
                        3. Jim Bottomley - 24
                        ---
                        4. Sam Crawford - 20
                        5. Mike Tiernan - 18
                        6. Hans Wagner - 16
                        7. Jim O'Rourke - 12
                        8. Hugh Duffy - 8
                        9. Tillie Walker - 6
                        10. Harry Heilmann - 4
                        "No matter how great you were once upon a time — the years go by, and men forget,” - W. A. Phelon in Baseball Magazine in 1915. “Ross Barnes, forty years ago, was as great as Cobb or Wagner ever dared to be. Had scores been kept then as now, he would have seemed incomparably marvelous.”

                        Comment

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