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Vets Choices with Zero BBWAA Votes

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  • Vets Choices with Zero BBWAA Votes

    This is a comprehensive list of every man ever elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame (as a player from the Major Leagues) who never appeared on a BBWAA ballot, much less garnered a vote.

    There are eight such persons, all of whom played in the 19th Century.


    Jim O'Rourke
    Elected by the Hall of Fame Committee in 1945

    Pud Galvin
    Elected by the Veterans Committee in 1965

    Mickey Welch
    Elected by the Veterans Committee in 1973

    Sam Thompson
    Elected by the Veterans Committee in 1974

    Roger Connor
    Elected by the Veterans Committee in 1976

    Vic Willis
    Elected by the Veterans Committee in 1995

    George Davis
    Elected by the Veterans Committee in 1998

    Bid McPhee
    Elected by the Veterans Committee in 2000
    "It is a simple matter to erect a Hall of Fame, but difficult to select the tenants." -- Ken Smith
    "I am led to suspect that some of the electorate is very dumb." -- Henry P. Edwards
    "You have a Hall of Fame to put people in, not keep people out." -- Brian Kenny
    "There's no such thing as a perfect ballot." -- Jay Jaffe

  • #2
    Some good detective work, there! Of those, the only two who are arguable, IMO are Galvin and Welch. Galvin's extreme longevity is noteworthy and Welch was elected because he has 300+ wins. Welch is the weakest of this set, IMO and minus the 300 win milestone; which meant nothing in Welch's day, he looks like a lower tier HOFer at best and a clear mistake election at worst.

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    • #3
      On Jim O'Rourke, I was greatly saddened when the house he built was razed in 2009. He was such an integral part of Bridgeport, CT history and a key figure in the development of NL baseball:

      https://www.nytimes.com/2009/02/22/n...t/22colct.html

      https://www.newenglandhistoricalsoci...r-jim-orourke/

      Comment


      • #4
        George Davis and Roger Connor surprise me.
        “There can be no higher law in journalism than to tell the truth and to shame the devil.” Walter Lippmann

        "I don't care if the guy is yellow or black, or if he has stripes like a ******* zebra. I'm the manager of this team and I say he [Robinson] plays." - Leo Durocher

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by 1905 Giants View Post
          George Davis and Roger Connor surprise me.
          I should point out that not only did none of these players appear on a BBWAA ballot, but none appeared on the 1936 Old-Timers ballot (specifically for 19th century players) either! When the 70-something baseball "veterans" with firsthand knowledge of the 19th century cast their ballots in that unique election, neither Davis nor Connor (nor any of the other 8 mentioned in the OP) received a single vote.
          "It is a simple matter to erect a Hall of Fame, but difficult to select the tenants." -- Ken Smith
          "I am led to suspect that some of the electorate is very dumb." -- Henry P. Edwards
          "You have a Hall of Fame to put people in, not keep people out." -- Brian Kenny
          "There's no such thing as a perfect ballot." -- Jay Jaffe

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Chadwick View Post
            I should point out that not only did none of these players appear on a BBWAA ballot, but none appeared on the 1936 Old-Timers ballot (specifically for 19th century players) either! When the 70-something baseball "veterans" with firsthand knowledge of the 19th century cast their ballots in that unique election, neither Davis nor Connor (nor any of the other 8 mentioned in the OP) received a single vote.
            It's a travesty.
            “There can be no higher law in journalism than to tell the truth and to shame the devil.” Walter Lippmann

            "I don't care if the guy is yellow or black, or if he has stripes like a ******* zebra. I'm the manager of this team and I say he [Robinson] plays." - Leo Durocher

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by jjpm74 View Post
              Of those, the only two who are arguable, IMO are Galvin and Welch. Galvin's extreme longevity is noteworthy and Welch was elected because he has 300+ wins. Welch is the weakest of this set, IMO and minus the 300 win milestone; which meant nothing in Welch's day, he looks like a lower tier HOFer at best and a clear mistake election at worst.
              Great catch!

              300 wins did, however, mean a great deal in the 1960s, when both Early Wynn and Warren Spahn received that total I believe Galvin was one of the "Lee Allen selections", having been rediscovered through Allen's research of old ballplayers. That said, when Galvin was elected by the VC in the spring of 1965, Wynn's run at 300 was still in recent memory for many fans and, thus, the "importance" of 300 was still on the brain for Hall of Fame voters.

              The MacMillan Baseball Encyclopedia was published in 1969. (This importance of this cannot be overstated.) The baseball writers elected Early Wynn in January 1972 and Warren Spahn in January 1973. When the Veterans Committee met a month later, during Spring Training, it would have been widely known that the elections of Wynn and Spahn now left Mickey Welch as the member of the (then) 14-man 300 Win Club not already enshrined in the Hall of Fame. The electors clearly put Welch forth on that basis (and that basis alone), believing they were correcting an oversight.
              "It is a simple matter to erect a Hall of Fame, but difficult to select the tenants." -- Ken Smith
              "I am led to suspect that some of the electorate is very dumb." -- Henry P. Edwards
              "You have a Hall of Fame to put people in, not keep people out." -- Brian Kenny
              "There's no such thing as a perfect ballot." -- Jay Jaffe

              Comment

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