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Sad Sam Jones

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  • Chadwick
    replied
    Sam's gonna have to stay sad. Not a prayer.

    Maybe...maybe one of the 200 greatest starting pitchers in history. Nowhere near HOF caliber though.

    Leave a comment:


  • KCGHOST
    replied
    Nothing to even think about here. Not a chance.

    Leave a comment:


  • Fuzzy Bear
    replied
    Dennis Martinez has a better case.

    No to BOTH Sad Sam Joneses.

    Leave a comment:


  • dgarza
    replied
    Originally posted by soberdennis View Post
    At best a maybe.
    I think at best he's still a no.
    Out of 22 season, only were pretty good (1921, 1928, 1933).
    The other 19 were OK to bad.

    Leave a comment:


  • soberdennis
    replied
    At best a maybe. He played for some good teams too like the Red Sox of the teens and the Yankees of the early 20s. His record just doesn't impress me. I vote no.

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  • 1905 Giants
    replied
    No. Even adjusting for the terrible teams, the postseason ERA, etc. he doesn't stand a chance.

    Leave a comment:


  • Cowtipper
    started a poll Sad Sam Jones

    Sad Sam Jones

    16
    Yes
    0.00%
    0
    No
    93.75%
    15
    Maybe
    6.25%
    1
    Blah, you may think. Why in the world even consider starting a thread for Sad Sam Jones (the one who pitched from 1914-1935, that is). Well, he wasn't as bad as his stats make him look.

    Sad Sam Jones had a career record of 229-217, with an ERA of 3.84. Not the most impressive, but when you consider that the teams he played for had a combined winning percentage of only .498, those numbers begin to look a little better. Jones also won 15 or more games six times, and 20 or more games twice.

    He led the league in Winning percentage in 1918, in shutouts in 1921, in saves in 1922, and in 1935 he was the oldest player in the league. Statistically, he is similar to four Hall of Famers: Red Faber, Ted Lyons, Waite Hoyt and Burleigh Grimes.

    He was a real stud in the postseason, posting a 2.05 ERA in 22 IP.

    He also threw a no-hitter in 1923. Oddly, he struck out exactly zero hitters in that no-hitter.

    Here's a totally absurd Hall of Fame argument that I'm sure will get mocked and ridiculed, but I'll throw it out there anyway: Jones is tied for the record for most consecutive seasons pitching in one league (he pitched in the AL). All the pitchers he shares that record wit - Herb Pennock, Early Wynn, Red Ruffing, and Steve Carlton - are in the Hall of Fame, so Jones should be in the Hall too, right? (I know that argument doesn't hold any water, it's more of a joke than anything)

    So, should Sad Sam be in the Hall of Fame?

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