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  • #61
    Originally posted by Jar of Flies View Post
    I'll 3rd the comments, nice work putting these together dgarza.
    I will 4th this. Those articles really put Lou's HOF case into a better generational perspective.

    Comment


    • #62
      I noticed that Whitaker's rate stats went up towards the end of his career and he ended up finishing his career strong. So strong that many of his numbers in the 90s were noticeably better than his numbers in the 70s and 80s. How did that affect the view of him as HOFer or not? On one hand, intuitively, finishing strong can't hurt a player's HOF case, right? But on the other hand, people tend to remember a player from his days in the limelight. It was in the 80s when Whitaker was perennial All Star and winning GG and SS awards. He won ROY in the 70s and was considered for an MVP in the 80s. But these were also the years when his batting rates where lower. So did that color and solidify people's perception of him? And caused them to not really notice Whitaker when his rates were up in the 90s, but he was no longer an All Star?

      What further hurts him is that some of his best rate seasons were his last two, which also happened to be the strike years, 1994 & 1995. Surely those two (plus 1981) cost Whitaker a few cumulative stats, even though he was only a part-time player in 94-95.

      1977-1989 (age 20-32)
      .276/.357/.412/.768
      112 OPS+

      1990-1995 (age 33-38)
      .277/.379/.464/.843
      129 OPS+

      Career stats
      Runs - 1386
      Hits - 2369
      Doubles - 420
      Triples - 65
      HRs - 244
      RBIs - 1084
      Stolen Bases - 143
      BBs - 1197
      .276/.363/.426/.789
      117 OPS+
      WAA - 42.8
      WAR - 75.1

      Strike adjusted projections
      Runs - 1440
      Hits - 2459
      Doubles - 435
      Triples - 66
      HRs - 251
      RBIs - 1123
      Stolen Bases - 145
      BBs - 1235
      .276/.363/.425/.788
      117 OPS+
      WAA - 44.5
      WAR - 78.0

      Comment


      • #63
        Originally posted by dgarza View Post
        I noticed that Whitaker's rate stats went up towards the end of his career and he ended up finishing his career strong. So strong that many of his numbers in the 90s were noticeably better than his numbers in the 70s and 80s. How did that affect the view of him as HOFer or not? On one hand, intuitively, finishing strong can't hurt a player's HOF case, right? But on the other hand, people tend to remember a player from his days in the limelight. It was in the 80s when Whitaker was perennial All Star and winning GG and SS awards. He won ROY in the 70s and was considered for an MVP in the 80s. But these were also the years when his batting rates where lower. So did that color and solidify people's perception of him? And caused them to not really notice Whitaker when his rates were up in the 90s, but he was no longer an All Star?

        What further hurts him is that some of his best rate seasons were his last two, which also happened to be the strike years, 1994 & 1995. Surely those two (plus 1981) cost Whitaker a few cumulative stats, even though he was only a part-time player in 94-95.

        1977-1989 (age 20-32)
        .276/.357/.412/.768
        112 OPS+

        1990-1995 (age 33-38)
        .277/.379/.464/.843
        129 OPS+

        Career stats
        Runs - 1386
        Hits - 2369
        Doubles - 420
        Triples - 65
        HRs - 244
        RBIs - 1084
        Stolen Bases - 143
        BBs - 1197
        .276/.363/.426/.789
        117 OPS+
        WAA - 42.8
        WAR - 75.1

        Strike adjusted projections
        Runs - 1440
        Hits - 2459
        Doubles - 435
        Triples - 66
        HRs - 251
        RBIs - 1123
        Stolen Bases - 145
        BBs - 1235
        .276/.363/.425/.788
        117 OPS+
        WAA - 44.5
        WAR - 78.0
        At that late stage of his career, Whitaker was heavily platooned, rarely facing left-handed pitching. That gave his rate stats a big boost, as he struggled against LHP for much of his career.

        Comment


        • #64
          Originally posted by Cougar View Post

          At that late stage of his career, Whitaker was heavily platooned, rarely facing left-handed pitching. That gave his rate stats a big boost, as he struggled against LHP for much of his career.
          Thanks for pointing that out. Looking at his splits, I can see that his LF PAs dropped dramatically in the 90s, falling from a customary ~30% of his PAs, to 20% and then 10-15%.

          Still, to his credit, he started hitting both righties and lefties better. In 3 of his 90s seasons, he was batting LHP better than his career Average, twice batting over .300, hitting .355 against LHP in 1992. His LHP slugging was up as well. This might have been a result of selective lineup matches, but since his numbers vs RHP was also up, it really looks like he was just hitting better overall.

          Comment

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