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Doc Gooden...Not-a-doubter!!

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  • Doc Gooden...Not-a-doubter!!

    Over his first ten seasons (before his troubles caught up to him, finally stealing from him the almost supernatural talent he displayed consistently) he put up the following numbers:

    154 Wins 81 Losses (.655 Winning Pct.)
    3.03 ERA
    1.04 Baserunners/IP
    1800+ SO vs. less than 500 BB

    DOMINATING!

    Any Ideas???

  • #2
    maybe if he'd blown out his arm without the help of drugs, he'd get more of a look at the hall. as it is, he's not getting in without a ticket.

    Comment


    • #3
      tibster, think again...

      the Doc will soon be elected:

      the numbers are as good or better than some already in;
      world series champ with the metsies AND the yanks;
      overcame his problems and although only a shadow of his old self he threw a no no and pitched in the world series for the eventual champion yanks

      by 2010...there will be a doctor in the house!

      what say you?

      Comment


      • #4
        No. No how, no way, no chance. Not ever. Never ever never never ever never. Not gonna happen.

        And I'm a fan of his.
        "Simply put, the passion, interest and tradition surrounding baseball in New York is unmatched."

        Sean McAdam, ESPN.com

        Comment


        • #5
          all the voters are going to see is the cocaine problem. that's why dave parker and keith hernandez aren't getting in anytime soon. it's probably not fair (wasn't the soon to be inducted paul molitor also implicated in the pittsburgh drug trial?) but that's the way it is.

          Comment


          • #6
            I always always a fan of the mid 1980's New York Mets with Doc pitching and Darryl hitting life was good.

            I have read somewhere a post about how Doc Gooden getting hurt in 1988-89 leading to his early decline more so than the drugs.

            Doc was awesome but he will never make the Hall of Fame.

            Put Gooden in with the sometimes great sometimes awesome pitchers - aka Cone, Saberhagen, Appier, Stewart and Hershiser.

            Comment


            • #7
              Gooden far far better than the Appier-Sabes crowd

              My friend,

              Gooden sports a lifetime .634 winning pct. (194 - 112)
              2293 Lifetime K's in 2800 2/3 IP
              Only Lifetime 954 BB
              13 Seasons with ERA at least .90 runs lower than league average!
              1985 Season: 24 - 4, 1.53 ERA - more than 2.00 runs lower than NL Avg, 276.67 IP (268 K w/69 BB)...one of the best 25 seasons ever!!

              Dave

              Comment


              • #8
                Sorry, it's not happening.

                Gooden was awesome at the beginning of his career, sure... but after 1987 (when he was all of 22 years old), he NEVER had a qualifying season with an ERA+ better than 114. Not one. At all.

                You're flat out wrong on him having 13 seasons with an ERA 0.90 less than league average... he had TWO such seasons, 1984 and 1985... and that's it. He never did it again (except 1998, when he didn't pitch enough innings to qualify).

                He's 111th among pitchers in grey ink. He was never in the top 10 in W, ERA, or K rate after 1991... when he was 26.

                Sorry, buddy. Doc was a great pitcher. But when your career is effectively over by age 26... you're not going to the Hall.
                "Simply put, the passion, interest and tradition surrounding baseball in New York is unmatched."

                Sean McAdam, ESPN.com

                Comment


                • #9
                  start or finish?

                  i am not an expert, but i think that koufax was below average for several years, until he put it all together and dominated for five or six years in the early and mid-sixties. do not misunderstand me about this, koufax at his best was significantly better than doc at his best. what i AM saying is that doc was one of the best pitchers for six or seven years (out of 13ish) and koufax was stunningly amazing (better than doc) for six or seven seasons (out of 13ish). if you do not agree with me that were doc's numbers exactly the same for the second part of his career as they were for the first, he would be HOF bound, then how does koufax get in if he only dominated for a relatively short amount of time??

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    part 2

                    i may be reading the stats incorrectly, but goodens stat line indicates that his era was indeed better than the nl-average for the number of years i suggest...if i am wrong, please help me read the info correctly.

                    thanks,
                    dave

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      --Gooden was more than a run better than the league era his first two years, .70 better his third year and his best year over the next 13 was .48 better than league (in a year when he pitched enough innings to qualify).
                      --His rookie year was excellent for anyone and amazing for a teenager. His second season was one of the great seasons ever and he was very good for two more. Years 5-9 he was 1% better than league, 13% better, 2% worse, 1% better and 5% worse. For his career he ended up 10% better than the league in ERA+ (era relative to league and adjusted for park effects). With his modest career totals that is not nearly dominant enough. Maybe, but probably not, he would have a chance had his decline not been at least partly self inflicted.
                      --He really only had the one season of truely dominant play that you need to make the Hall with less than 200 wins. I just can't see it happening for Doc. Its a shame, for a brief moment he was the best I ever saw pitch.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        It always helps to look at the voting support for similar players to determine how your guy might fare. Ron Guidry is about as close to a ringer for Gooden as you'll find: one big year, 3-4 more really good years, played in NY, great W-L pct, short of 200 wins.

                        Guidry's HOF voting record:

                        Code:
                        Year Election Votes Pct 
                        1994  BBWAA  24  5.27  
                        1995  BBWAA  25  5.43  
                        1996  BBWAA  37  7.87  
                        1997  BBWAA  31  6.55  
                        1998  BBWAA  37  7.82  
                        1999  BBWAA  31  6.24  
                        2000  BBWAA  44  8.82  
                        2001  BBWAA  27  5.24  
                        2002  BBWAA  23  4.87
                        Never had 10% support and doesn't carry the baggage that Dwight has.

                        Gooden will be lucky to get the 5% needed to continue. Valenzuela is another that comes to mind and he was bounced off after his 2nd year.
                        Si quaeris peninsulam amoenam, circumspice.

                        Comprehensive Reform for the Veterans Committee -- Fixing the Hall continued.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by kranepool
                          the Doc will soon be elected:

                          the numbers are as good or better than some already in;
                          world series champ with the metsies AND the yanks;
                          overcame his problems and although only a shadow of his old self he threw a no no and pitched in the world series for the eventual champion yanks

                          by 2010...there will be a doctor in the house!

                          what say you?
                          Gooden is not the only one on crack. That's what I think.
                          WAR? Prove it!

                          Trusted Traders: ttmman21, Dalkowski110, BoofBonser26, Kearns643, HudsonHarden, Extra Innings, MadHatter, Mike D., J.P., SShifflett

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Man,I was third row next to the Pirate dugout the night in Sept. when Doc needed 16 k's to bust Herb Scores rookie record.I had chills watching him.16 Buccos down and I remember telling my girlfriend( who I am sure could not have cared less ) on the way home from Shea that we were seeing the greatest pitcher we'd ever see.The next year he was unreal and in 86 I got to see him and Ryan( with a broken foot it turned out!) go to ten innings until Darryl won it with a dinger in the playoffs.My feelings on Doc were so utterly dissapointed in his life choices. He was unreal and could have made us all forget the rest but he'd rather hit the pipe. Do not forget that after Steinbrenner gave him a reprieve he ignored his agreement with the Yankees ,broke curfew in Texas, stayed late at a strip bar(despite his daily AA agreement) and punched out a taxi driver over a fare.Stupid? Yes.Arrogant? Way over the line.His and Straws drug use kept his teamates from being a special franchise in the late 80's but both had a finger pointed at someone else

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by kranepool
                              i am not an expert, but i think that koufax was below average for several years, until he put it all together and dominated for five or six years in the early and mid-sixties. do not misunderstand me about this, koufax at his best was significantly better than doc at his best. what i AM saying is that doc was one of the best pitchers for six or seven years (out of 13ish) and koufax was stunningly amazing (better than doc) for six or seven seasons (out of 13ish). if you do not agree with me that were doc's numbers exactly the same for the second part of his career as they were for the first, he would be HOF bound, then how does koufax get in if he only dominated for a relatively short amount of time??
                              (A) Koufax went out on top. He could have still pitched, but doctors told him that if he continued to pitch, over time, his arthritis would get worse to where he would not have been able to straighten his arm. (It's possible that today, his prognosis would not have been as bad, due to advances in sports medicine, and Koufax would have continued to pitch.) Gooden went out on the bottom, AFTER hurting his arm, and getting into problems with substance abuse.

                              (B) Gooden gets SOME credit for being a star at 19, but it was his undoing in the end. Koufax's early mediocre years were due to a rule that required the Dodgers to keep a pitcher on the roster for two years if he received a signing bonus of such and such amount. Koufax spent age 19 and 20 on the big league roster not really ready for the show, but stuck there because of a rule. Had Koufax come up in 1958, and had he pitched one more year, we would not hear as much carping about his "short" career.

                              I'm a bit of a fan on this issue, but I love Sandy Koufax. Sandy is the kind of athlete that I wish every athlete were. Quiet. Unassuming. Not attention seeking. Practical and rational, not egomaniacal. (His decision to retire while on top showed uncommon good sense; how many jocks play 2-3 more years and end up cripples at 50?) He was a winner, and he was the main reason the Dodgers won three pennants and two world championships in 4 years in the sixties. He was the best player on the Dodgers, and the best by a lot. If that's not a great player, well . . .
                              Last edited by Fuzzy Bear; 06-15-2006, 05:51 AM.
                              "I do not care if half the league strikes. Those who do it will encounter quick retribution. All will be suspended and I don't care if it wrecks the National League for five years. This is the United States of America and one citizen has as much right to play as another. The National League will go down the line with Robinson whatever the consequences. You will find if you go through with your intention that you have been guilty of complete madness."

                              NL President Ford Frick, 1947

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