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Smokey Joe Wood - HOF?

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  • Smokey Joe Wood - HOF?

    What does everyone think? Should Smokey be in the Hall? Personally, I think his IP are too few to put him in, but golly what a career in that short time! What does everyone else think?
    21
    Yes
    19.05%
    4
    No
    61.90%
    13
    Maybe
    19.05%
    4
    Red, it took me 16 years to get here. Play me, and you'll get the best I got.

  • #2
    --Way too short.

    Comment


    • #3
      Joe Wood had 7 good seasons as a pitcher, '09-15.

      Sandy Koufax had 6 good seasons as a pitcher, '61-66.

      Bill Lange had 7 good seasons as an OF, 1893-1899.

      Dizzy Dean had 6 good seasons as a pitcher, 1932-37.

      Addie Joss had 7 good seasons as a pitcher, 1902-08.

      Rube Waddell had 7 good seasons as a pitcher, 1902-08.

      Urban Shocker had 9 good seasons as a pitcher, 1919-27.

      Bobo Newsom was a good pitcher for 12 yrs. between '34-53.

      Early Wynn was a very good pitcher for 22 yrs. between '41-63.

      Bert Blyleven was a very good pitcher for 22 yrs. between '70-92.

      Eppa Rixey was a very good pitcher for 21 yrs. between '12-33.

      The Hall of Fame was not created to honor the 20 yr. good pitcher, nor the 5 yr. great one. A Hall of Fame pitcher, for me, should have a peak of at least 7-8 truly great yrs. with some others yrs. as a very good one, for longevity.

      For me, even the great Koufax/Dean, were borderline Famers, due to the duration of their greatness. Joss is a truer Famer than Dean/Koufax, due to his 2 extra yrs.

      Tons of players had a great few years, got hurt, or something else happened, and were only a shell of themselves after that. Oliva, Clark, Mattingly, Sisler, Reiser, Score, McDowell, Griffey Jr., J. R. Richards, Gooden, Dave Parker.

      Of course, some just threw their careers away. McDowell became a hopeless drunk, Parker got addicted to cocaine, Gooden, drugs, Strawberry, drugs, Waddell, liquor.

      Wood, despite fighting back and becoming an OF, was only a Hall pitcher for '11-12. Wonderful warrior's spirit, but simply not a Hall pitcher. Perhaps we should find another alternative honor to confer, as an alternative to the Hall.

      Bill Burgess
      Last edited by Bill Burgess; 08-28-2004, 12:45 PM.

      Comment


      • #4
        --Those 1911-12 seasons were the only ones where Wood started 30 games or pitched 200 innings. He was a great talent, but his peak wasn't nearly as long as short career HoFers Koufax, Dean or Joss. I think more recent guys like Guidry and Gooden whose best years were as good as Wood's and who stuck around for solid careers deserve consideration ahead of Wood. I wouldn't vote for any of the three, but if I had to pick one it would be Guidry with Gooden 2nd and Wood last of the group.

        Comment


        • #5
          Addie Joss had about 2 more pitching years in than Wood did and Wood was a pitcher (of some sort) for 2 more years than Joss!

          Joss 286 pitching games in 9 years
          Wood 225 pitching games in 11 years

          Comment


          • #6
            Wood falls into that category What Could Have Been.

            He was great but not an elite pitcher.

            Granted the Hall of Fame has been putting in just great players for awhile but two worngs dont make a roght.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by julusnc
              Wood falls into that category What Could Have Been.

              He was great but not an elite pitcher.

              Granted the Hall of Fame has been putting in just great players for awhile but two worngs dont make a roght.
              No; Wood certainly was an elite pitcher.

              He falls in the same category as Doc Gooden... amazingly awesome for a little while, just not particularly long, and had a big stretch of nothing for much of his career.

              I'd rather see guys like Gooden and Wood in the hall than guys like Sutton and Wynn... but I'd prefer it if none of them got in.
              "Simply put, the passion, interest and tradition surrounding baseball in New York is unmatched."

              Sean McAdam, ESPN.com

              Comment


              • #8
                I think to be qualified as an elite pitcher you have to have more than 5 great years under your belt.

                Aka Big Train Big Six Three Finger Cy Spahnie but then again to each his own.

                Would you consider Ruth as a elite pitcher EH?

                I would rather vote for some of the better Negro League pitchers that had long careers than Wood or Gooden.
                Last edited by julusnc; 08-27-2004, 02:34 PM.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by julusnc
                  I think to be qualified as an elite pitcher you have to have more than 5 great years under your belt.

                  Aka Big Train Big Six Three Finger Cy Spahnie but then again to each his own.

                  Would you consider Ruth as a elite pitcher EH?

                  I would rather vote for some of the better Negro League pitchers that had long careers than Wood or Gooden.
                  I think this is just a definitional difference here.

                  Yes, I would consider Ruth to be an elite pitcher. I'd also consider Guidry, Wood, John Tudor, and Vean Gregg to be elite pitchers. At their best, they were pretty much as good as anybody has ever been. But I don't think a single one of them belongs in the Hall of Fame (well, Ruth, sure, but not for his pitching). They were "elite" for a year or two... but not so much for the rest of their careers.

                  I do, however, think that they'd belong in the Hall ahead of guys like Sutton and Wynn, who were above average for a very long time... to me, being among the greatest of all time for a couple of years is "greater" than being pretty good for 20 years. But in neither case do I feel the player belongs in the Hall.

                  As to the pitchers you mentioned... sure, those are all elite pitchers. But they managed to maintain their eliteness for a long enough time that they became All Time Greats. Wood, Gooden, etc., won't be showing up on anybody's top 40 starting pitcher's list...

                  But answer me this question: Who would you rather have start one game for you, if you needed to win one game and one game only... Doc Gooden in 1985, or Warren Spahn at any point of his career... pick your favorite point.

                  I'd say that 90% of the people answering that question would say the Doctor... so, at least by the way I define things, Doc is more "elite" than Spahn... even though Gooden doesn't crack my top 40 all time, and doesn't deserve a Hall spot to me, while I rank Spahn as my number 5 or 6 pitcher all time.
                  Last edited by ElHalo; 08-27-2004, 02:51 PM.
                  "Simply put, the passion, interest and tradition surrounding baseball in New York is unmatched."

                  Sean McAdam, ESPN.com

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by [email protected]

                    Tons of players had a great few years, got hurt, or something else happened, and were only a shell of themselves after that. Oliva, Clark, Mattingly, Sisler, Reiser, Score, McDowell, Griffey Jr., J. R. Richards, Gooden, Wes Parker...

                    ...Of course, some just threw their careers away. McDowell became a hopeless drunk, Parker got addicted to cocaine, Gooden, drugs, Strawberry, drugs, Waddell, liquor.

                    Bill Burgess
                    Surely you mean Dave Parker, rather than Wes Parker.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Hall of Fame ability? Sure
                      Hall of fame career? Doubt it.

                      Its scary to think what he and Joss could have done had they stayed healthy.
                      I share pictures from my collection of baseball photographs on twitter @PastimeClassics

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        baclightning,

                        Oops. Thanks for the correction. I did indeed mean Dave, not Wes Parker.

                        Bill Burgess

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by dgarza
                          Joss 286 pitching games in 9 years
                          Wood 225 pitching games in 11 years
                          I think rather than the length of their careers, the number of games they pitched is the appropriate stat here.

                          Joss is pushing it; nonetheless he started at least 30 games five times, and also posted a 29, 28, and 24. So effectively, 8 of his 9 years in the bigs meant something.

                          Smokey Joe started at least 30 games only twice! TWICE! In no other season did he even start 20 games. Now to be fair, he did have 67 relief appearances... but he just didn't last long enough for me to give him support.
                          http://gifrific.com/wp-content/uploa...-showalter.gif

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            One pitcher who pitched fewer seasons than Smokey Joe who DID make the Hall of Fame is Amos Rusie, who pitched for only 10 years. Some people might say his career was too short, but he logged over 300 innings in 8 of those 10 years, won 20 or more games 8 times, and won 30 or more 4 times, and his 1894 season ranks up there with Wood's 1912 season, when you adjust for the era. Rusie is probably the extreme case of a pitcher with a very short career who's HOF worthy. Wood has better rate stats, but Rusie pitched almost 3 times the amount of innings.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by The Only Nolan
                              One pitcher who pitched fewer seasons than Smokey Joe who DID make the Hall of Fame is Amos Rusie, who pitched for only 10 years. Some people might say his career was too short, but he logged over 300 innings in 8 of those 10 years, won 20 or more games 8 times, and won 30 or more 4 times, and his 1894 season ranks up there with Wood's 1912 season, when you adjust for the era. Rusie is probably the extreme case of a pitcher with a very short career who's HOF worthy. Wood has better rate stats, but Rusie pitched almost 3 times the amount of innings.
                              Actually, Joss, who was only in the majors for 9 years and was basically useless for the ninth of those years, is the usual benchmark for short career pitchers... though Dizzy Dean has him beat by a mile.
                              "Simply put, the passion, interest and tradition surrounding baseball in New York is unmatched."

                              Sean McAdam, ESPN.com

                              Comment

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