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  • Votes for Allison, Wheaton and Wadsworth will be accepted. In this project, I haven't kept a formal list like in other projects. Also, are you going to participate in the Best of Baseball project? If so, let me know.
    Seen on a bumper sticker: If only closed minds came with closed mouths.
    Some minds are like concrete--thoroughly mixed up and permanently set.
    A Lincoln: I don't think much of a man who is not wiser today than he was yesterday.

    Comment


    • I'm shuffling my 25 players largely due to the fact this is the first time I've applied my new rating system to this project.

      1. Bobby Abreu
      2. Sal Bando
      3. Buddy Bell
      4. Cesar Cedeno
      5. Bus Clarkson
      6. David Cone
      7. Yutaka Enatsu
      8. Andruw Jones
      9. Chipper Jones
      10. Charlie Keller
      11. Masaaki Koyama
      12. Hiromitsu Ochiai
      13. Willie Randolph
      14. Rick Reuschel
      15. Scott Rolen
      16. Bret Saberhagen
      17. Gary Sheffield
      18. Chino Smith
      19. Reggie Smith
      20. Sammy Sosa
      21. Dave Stieb
      22. Jim Thome
      23. Luis Tiant
      24. Quincy Trouppe
      25. Jimmy Wynn
      Seen on a bumper sticker: If only closed minds came with closed mouths.
      Some minds are like concrete--thoroughly mixed up and permanently set.
      A Lincoln: I don't think much of a man who is not wiser today than he was yesterday.

      Comment


      • Originally posted by bluesky5 View Post
        Another contributor:

        Doug Allison

        Allison was the first catcher to play right behind the batter and the first to use a glove. Also the first professional catcher. Very durable for his time.



        Allison played 279 G at catcher and 61 in the OF [mostly RF].
        When the NA began in 1871 he was 24.
        He began as a semi-pro player in Philadelphia [for the Geary Club] before becoming the regular catcher for the famed and fabled Cincinnati Red Stockings from 1868-70.
        He was 2-21 as manager of the fabled Elizabeth Resolutes [NA] in 1873.
        He jumped around the NA, as did most everyone, and was done as a full time player after 1876 at age 30.
        Catchers had no [zero] equipment or protection.

        In NA and NL play [9 seasons]:

        318 G|1407 AB|236 R|382 H|44 doubles|10 triples|2 HR|139 RBI|44 SO|.271/.284/.321

        GP and WAR
        27/30: 0.9
        -2tm-: 1.4
        23/25
        18/NA
        -------
        -2tm-: 0.4
        11/NA
        19/23
        -------
        65/65: 0.7
        61/86: 1.4
        44/70: 1.5
        29/60: 0.1
        19/60: 0.5

        He is third in WAR among majority catchers at the time [1871-78], behind Cal McVey [whom he caught 100 more games than] and Deacon White.
        I've never heard the Elizabeth Resolutes called "fabled" before. Please elaborate.

        Comment


        • Originally posted by Cougar View Post
          I've never heard the Elizabeth Resolutes called "fabled" before. Please elaborate.
          Aren't you the guy from that town that asked me to describe them as such?
          "No matter how great you were once upon a time — the years go by, and men forget,” - W. A. Phelon in Baseball Magazine in 1915. “Ross Barnes, forty years ago, was as great as Cobb or Wagner ever dared to be. Had scores been kept then as now, he would have seemed incomparably marvelous.”

          Comment


          • Oh yeah...I forgot that, and therefore I didn't know you were kidding.

            Thanks.

            Comment


            • Originally posted by Cougar View Post
              Oh yeah...I forgot that, and therefore I didn't know you were kidding.

              Thanks.
              Lol, no problem.
              "No matter how great you were once upon a time — the years go by, and men forget,” - W. A. Phelon in Baseball Magazine in 1915. “Ross Barnes, forty years ago, was as great as Cobb or Wagner ever dared to be. Had scores been kept then as now, he would have seemed incomparably marvelous.”

              Comment

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