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  • Of course...Pete Rose too...how could I forget him? LOL

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    • Originally posted by Captain Cold Nose View Post
      You would think so. But using statistical analysis alone has its flaws, as well. You can focus on certain stats that are unfairly weighted one way or another or don't address certain things. Someone can be honest and objective in their own assessment of things. It's keying too much on someone else's viewpoint that can be a problem.

      yes but they can just as easily be biased in their personal opinions
      1. The more I learn, the more convinced I am that many players are over-rated due to inflated stats from offensive home parks (and eras)
      2. Strat-O-Matic Baseball Player, Collector and Hobbyist since 1969, visit my strat site: http://forums.delphiforums.com/GamersParadise
      3. My table top gaming blog: http://cary333.blogspot.com/

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      • Originally posted by 9RoyHobbsRF View Post
        yes but they can just as easily be biased in their personal opinions
        Absolutely. People can have agendas, which is why personal opinions should be taken for what they are. Stats don't have agendas. The person presenting the stats can, though, just as easily manipulate what they present as the person voicing their opinion can.

        Bottom line, straight objectivity isn't such an easy thing to find.
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        • No

          Will the thrill should go in way before Garvey..........

          Cav

          Will OPS+ 137 in PED era
          Garvey 116+..........
          You can't sit on a lead and run a few plays into the line and just kill the clock. You've got to throw the ball over the $%#%! plate and give the other man his chance. That's why baseball is the greatest game of them all. ~Earl Weaver

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          • Originally posted by Captain Cold Nose View Post
            Bottom line, straight objectivity isn't such an easy thing to find.
            It's easier to find that a legitimate justification for Garvey's induction.
            "It is a simple matter to erect a Hall of Fame, but difficult to select the tenants." -- Ken Smith
            "I am led to suspect that some of the electorate is very dumb." -- Henry P. Edwards
            "You have a Hall of Fame to put people in, not keep people out." -- Brian Kenny
            "There's no such thing as a perfect ballot." -- Jay Jaffe

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            • He was better than Cecil Cooper!
              Your Second Base Coach
              Garvey, Lopes, Russell, and Cey started 833 times and the Dodgers went 498-335, for a .598 winning percentage. That’s equal to a team going 97-65 over a season. On those occasions when at least one of them missed his start, the Dodgers were 306-267-1, which is a .534 clip. That works out to a team going 87-75. So having all four of them added 10 wins to the Dodgers per year.
              http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p5hCIvMule0

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              • Originally posted by JDD View Post
                He was better than Cecil Cooper!
                Not sure I agree with that, but even if it's true, so what? Cecil isn't in the Hall.

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                • Originally posted by JDD View Post
                  He was better than Cecil Cooper!
                  No, he absolutely was not.
                  "It is a simple matter to erect a Hall of Fame, but difficult to select the tenants." -- Ken Smith
                  "I am led to suspect that some of the electorate is very dumb." -- Henry P. Edwards
                  "You have a Hall of Fame to put people in, not keep people out." -- Brian Kenny
                  "There's no such thing as a perfect ballot." -- Jay Jaffe

                  Comment


                  • From his web site

                    Originally posted by PVNICK View Post
                    and Pete Rose
                    Steve Garvey - a name synonymous with excellence and success. One of baseball's most popular and durable players during one of baseball's greatest era's, Steve Garvey is known to even the most casual of baseball fans everywhere. A 10-time All Star and 1974 National League MVP, Garvey is destined for enshrinement at Cooperstown. :ooo:
                    Starring for the Los Angeles Dodgers and San Diego Padres in his illustrious career, Steve Garvey was nicknamed the "Iron Man" for setting the National League consecutive games record with 1,207 straight.

                    Simply put, Steve Garvey was a complete player - equally adept with the bat and glove - hitting for average and power to go along with his nearly flawless defense.



                    Cav
                    You can't sit on a lead and run a few plays into the line and just kill the clock. You've got to throw the ball over the $%#%! plate and give the other man his chance. That's why baseball is the greatest game of them all. ~Earl Weaver

                    Comment


                    • And

                      Steve Garvey garnered a number of accolades and achievements over the course of his illustrious career that will surely allow him to take his proper place amongst baseball's elite in the Baseball Hall of Fame. Below are some of his most outstanding accomplishments.
                      1974 National League Most Valuable Player.


                      National League's Iron Man - Holds NL consecutive games played record at 1,207 straight games.


                      10-time All Star selection, including eight straight (1974-1981).


                      Hit .300 seven times and finished with a .294 career average with 2,599 hits.


                      Led the NL in hits twice, collected 200 hits or more six times in seven seasons.


                      In 1974, became the ONLY player ever elected as an All-Star Game starter as a write-in candidate. Garvey earned the MVP Award in that game and later won another MVP in the the 1978 mid-summer classic.


                      Won four straight Gold Glove awards (1974-1977) and set a ML record with his career .996 fielding percentage at first base.


                      The ONLY player in MLB history to record an errorless season at first base (1984).


                      Set a MLB record for first baseman by playing 193 straight games without committing an error.


                      Drove in 100 runs five times, including four straight years (1977-1980).


                      One of the greatest clutch, post season players ever. Hit .300 or better in eight of his 11 post-season series. Hit .389 with four homers and seven RBI in the four-game 1978 NLCS win. Hit 10 home runs in the NLCS (a record at the time) and hit .338 with 11 homers, 31 RBI and 32 runs scored in 55 post-season contests. Played best when it mattered most.


                      Hit one of baseball's most memorable home runs, the famous game-winning home run in Game Four of the 1984 NLCS. The blast itself, combined with the huge team momentum and morale shifts that it caused, lifted the Padres into the deciding fifth game and ultimately to the team's first ever NL Pennant and World Series appearance. Garvey drove in five runs in all.


                      Won 1978 and 1984 NLCS MVP Awards. Team MVP of the 1974 NLCS (award not official until 1977).


                      Garvey led or tied for the team lead in batting average and total hits (among team's regulars) in an amazing eight out of 11 post-season series.


                      Led NL in Games six times (1977-78, 1980-82, 1985).

                      Cav
                      You can't sit on a lead and run a few plays into the line and just kill the clock. You've got to throw the ball over the $%#%! plate and give the other man his chance. That's why baseball is the greatest game of them all. ~Earl Weaver

                      Comment


                      • All I can say, cav, is

                        Superficially impressive. The writers have somehow seen through it by now, as well as his Mr. America image. Thankfully.
                        Dave Bill Tom George Mark Bob Ernie Soupy Dick Alex Sparky
                        Joe Gary MCA Emanuel Sonny Dave Earl Stan
                        Jonathan Neil Roger Anthony Ray Thomas Art Don
                        Gates Philip John Warrior Rik Casey Tony Horace
                        Robin Bill Ernie JEDI

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                        • Well, you know had they mentioned he was my favorite player, sort of (so were Tom Seaver, Rusty Staub, Willie Mays and Willie Stargell) for a time there in the mid 70s it might have put him over the top.:o

                          Comment


                          • Originally posted by cavalier1968 View Post
                            Steve Garvey garnered a number of accolades and achievements over the course of his illustrious career that will surely allow him to take his proper place amongst baseball's elite in the Baseball Hall of Fame. Below are some of his most outstanding accomplishments.
                            1974 National League Most Valuable Player.
                            Which Stargell or Schmidt SHOULD have won

                            <National League's Iron Man - Holds NL consecutive games played record at 1,207 straight games.>

                            So that was almost as good as Everett Scott (in the AL, I know)

                            <Hit .300 seven times and finished with a .294 career average with 2,599 hits.>

                            Doc Cramer

                            <Led the NL in hits twice>

                            Ginger Beaumont, Frank McCormick

                            <Won four straight Gold Glove awards (1974-1977) and set a ML record with his career .996 fielding percentage at first base.>

                            Few errors because he was a great glove, or because of poor range & not wanting to throw?

                            <The ONLY player in MLB history to record an errorless season at first base (1984).>

                            Actually, Mickey Stanley & Kevin Youkilis also did, and see above

                            <Drove in 100 runs five times, including four straight years (1977-1980).>

                            Joe Carter

                            <Led NL in Games six times (1977-78, 1980-82, 1985). >

                            About like Del Pratt (I know, AL)
                            Mythical SF Chronicle scouting report: "That Jeff runs like a deer. Unfortunately, he also hits AND throws like one." I am Venus DeMilo - NO ARM! I can play like a big leaguer, I can field like Luzinski, run like Lombardi. The secret to managing is keeping the ones who hate you away from the undecided ones. I am a triumph of quantity over quality. I'm almost useful, every village needs an idiot.
                            Good traders: MadHatter(2), BoofBonser26, StormSurge

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                            • Did I just read that Garvey had FLAWLESS defense?

                              Suuuuuuuuure.
                              Originally posted by Cougar
                              "Read at your own risk. Baseball Fever shall not be responsible if you become clinically insane trying to make sense of this post. People under 18 must read in the presence of a parent, guardian, licensed professional, or Dr. Phil."

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                              • In this post-steroid, I think he is poised for a comeback. Players from the 70s and 80s are looking good nowadays. All they did was spike their coffee to get ready for day games after night games.

                                Unless you were a catcher, then you got the day off.
                                Your Second Base Coach
                                Garvey, Lopes, Russell, and Cey started 833 times and the Dodgers went 498-335, for a .598 winning percentage. That’s equal to a team going 97-65 over a season. On those occasions when at least one of them missed his start, the Dodgers were 306-267-1, which is a .534 clip. That works out to a team going 87-75. So having all four of them added 10 wins to the Dodgers per year.
                                http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p5hCIvMule0

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