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All-Time HOF Team: Manager

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  • #31
    Originally posted by 9RoyHobbsRF View Post
    and forgot to mention

    the 1939 Yankees, which some consider the best team of all time and definitely a top 5

    did this despite losing the all time ML best first basemen Lou Gehrig

    he currently leads the poll on this site 34-3 over his nearest competitor

    if Gehrig had been on that team it would have been frightening
    Actually, he was
    Mythical SF Chronicle scouting report: "That Jeff runs like a deer. Unfortunately, he also hits AND throws like one." I am Venus DeMilo - NO ARM! I can play like a big leaguer, I can field like Luzinski, run like Lombardi. The secret to managing is keeping the ones who hate you away from the undecided ones. I am a triumph of quantity over quality. I'm almost useful, every village needs an idiot.
    Good traders: MadHatter(2), BoofBonser26, StormSurge

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    • #32
      28 AB 4 hits .143 average, 1 RBI

      yes your point that he was on the team trumps my point that he contributed nothing and if he had a good Lou Gehrig year they would have been even better (some already consider them the greatest team of all time)

      NOT

      Originally posted by RuthMayBond View Post
      Actually, he was
      1. The more I learn, the more convinced I am that many players are over-rated due to inflated stats from offensive home parks (and eras)
      2. Strat-O-Matic Baseball Player, Collector and Hobbyist since 1969, visit my strat site: http://forums.delphiforums.com/GamersParadise
      3. My table top gaming blog: http://cary333.blogspot.com/

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      • #33
        I would still vote for McGraw, McCarthy, and Stengel, but Earl Weaver deserves to be on the poll.

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        • #34
          great manager


          Originally posted by hwmongoose View Post
          I would still vote for McGraw, McCarthy, and Stengel, but Earl Weaver deserves to be on the poll.
          1. The more I learn, the more convinced I am that many players are over-rated due to inflated stats from offensive home parks (and eras)
          2. Strat-O-Matic Baseball Player, Collector and Hobbyist since 1969, visit my strat site: http://forums.delphiforums.com/GamersParadise
          3. My table top gaming blog: http://cary333.blogspot.com/

          Comment


          • #35
            Originally posted by 9RoyHobbsRF View Post
            great manager
            Yeah, an angry one, anyway lol... but unlucky 13 if included (Plus, how many votes would he get, could he really compete against these guys?)
            "Ya Gotta Believe!" -Tug McGraw ... "How we deal with death is at least as important as how we deal with life." -James T. Kirk ... "When you have eliminated the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth." -Sherlock Holmes ... "It is out of the deepest depth that the highest must come to its height." -Friedrich Nietzsche ... "There are more things in heaven and earth, Horatio, than are dreamt of in your philosophy." Hamlet

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            • #36
              What about Earl Weaver?

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              • #37
                Torre, Stengel and Mack
                MySpace Codes

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                • #38
                  I took McGraw as he was the actual architect and driving force behind his teams. The others usually had teams assembled by others.
                  Buck O'Neil: The Monarch of Baseball

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                  • #39
                    McGraw, Selee, and Chance would have easily have been my top three choices. But since the latter two have been mysteriously omitted from this poll, I don't know who else I'd rather select from the above. And in addition to Chance/Selee, I also think Ned Hanlon deserves some mention here as well.
                    "Age is a question of mind over matter--if you don't mind, it doesn't matter."
                    -Satchel Paige

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                    • #40
                      Originally posted by KCGHOST View Post
                      I took McGraw as he was the actual architect and driving force behind his teams. The others usually had teams assembled by others.
                      He was the architect behind 1915 thru 1924 AND 1934 thru 1950?
                      Mythical SF Chronicle scouting report: "That Jeff runs like a deer. Unfortunately, he also hits AND throws like one." I am Venus DeMilo - NO ARM! I can play like a big leaguer, I can field like Luzinski, run like Lombardi. The secret to managing is keeping the ones who hate you away from the undecided ones. I am a triumph of quantity over quality. I'm almost useful, every village needs an idiot.
                      Good traders: MadHatter(2), BoofBonser26, StormSurge

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        Originally posted by Shea Knight View Post
                        Yeah, an angry one, anyway lol... but unlucky 13 if included (Plus, how many votes would he get, could he really compete against these guys?)
                        There are 6 managers on the poll with 2, 3, or 4 votes and Weaver has been mentioned by myself and a few others on this thread, so it's easy to picture him finishing higher than those 6 with only a few votes. A brief list of his accomplishments include 6 division titles in his first 11 years as manager, 4 pennants, and 1 world championship, plus 5 100-win seasons, another potential division title in the strike season of 1981 when they had the best overall record in the division but didn't win either half season, another season that went to the final weekend (1977), and another season that went to the final day (1982). Plus, he had the guts to move Cal Ripken to shortstop (where he would go on to a Hall of Fame career) 50 days into his rookie season. Plus, they won it all (division, pennant, and world championship) again the year after he retired (1983). He also had the 2nd highest winning percentage of all time when he retired the first time after 14 1/2 years.

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                        • #42
                          Al Lopez, Ned Hanlon, Frank Selee and Earl Weaver are better choices than some of the names on this list. I'd have taken one of them as my third pick.
                          "It is a simple matter to erect a Hall of Fame, but difficult to select the tenants." -- Ken Smith
                          "I am led to suspect that some of the electorate is very dumb." -- Henry P. Edwards
                          "You have a Hall of Fame to put people in, not keep people out." -- Brian Kenny
                          "There's no such thing as a perfect ballot." -- Jay Jaffe

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