Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Single Ballot BBF Hall of Fame

Collapse
This is a sticky topic.
X
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Added Tommy Leach.

    Comment


    • Added Dave Parker.

      Comment


      • Originally posted by Chadwick View Post
        Please add Pie Traynor to my PHOF.

        Traynor had no business in any "greatest ever" conversation about third baseman, at least in my lifetime. He was never an "All-Time Great". His enduring popularity and HOF case rested on the following three phenomena:

        1. His .320 lifetime batting average, viewed outside of context, and not properly understood during Traynor's lifetime, made Traynor's bat look much better than it was.

        2. His 1,273 RBI, the most by any third baseman in the 20th century until Eddie Mathews, also ignored the context of Traynor batting lower in the order behind an average OBP of .372 for those ahead of him in the lineup throughout his prime years (1922-1934). Carey, Cuyler, Vaughan, both Waners, Lindstrom, Maranville and even Cronin (briefly) batted ahead of Traynor in those years; in short, Traynor had historic opportunity with runners on base ahead of him and historic opportunity in a high-batting average era where he collected many base hits with runners on base.

        3. Third basemen who were as good or better - Baker, Elliott, Groh and Hack, to name some - simply weren't recognized as being as good because their superficial counting numbers weren't viewed in context and/or their gloves weren't properly valued. Baker and Groh suffered from the Deadball Era. Elliott and Hack had lower BA, but better OBP.

        In short, Traynor is a low-end Hall of Famer when compared to the average HOF third baseman.

        However, my criticisms of Traynor have previously blinded me to the simple fact that Traynor was the best third baseman in the game in the 1920s and 1930s, and by a decent margin. Among NL position players during Traynor's 13-year prime, Traynor ranks among the top 10 overall. I advocate for players who fit that sort of description regularly. That's not an "inner circle" guy, but it's a deserving Hall of Famer. Traynor wasn't the one of the greatest third basemen of all-time, but he was the greatest third baseman of his time and that's enough, for me, to justify his induction.

        Pie Traynor, my apologies. Welcome to my PHOF.

        Correspondingly (albeit irrelevant to this project), I no longer consider Traynor's election to Cooperstown a mistake.
        That's a good job at looking at both sides of the coin.
        60 games is better than none.
        July 23 can't come soon enough.
        Bring on the 2020 season.
        PLAY BALL!

        Play the Who am I? game in trivia and you can make this signature line yours for 3 days (baseball signatures only!)

        Go here for a link to all player links! http://www.baseball-fever.com/forum/...player-threads

        Go here for all your 1920's/1930's OF info

        Comment


        • I have added Babe Adams and Dave Parker to my pHOF.

          Comment


          • Add Hershiser, remove David Wright
            1885 1886 1926 1931 1934 1942 1944 1946 1964 1967 1982 2006 2011

            1887 1888 1928 1930 1943 1968 1985 1987 2004 2013

            1996 2000 2001 2002 2005 2009 2012 2014 2015


            The Top 100 Pitchers In MLB History
            The Top 100 Position Players In MLB History

            Comment


            • I have added Dale Murphy to my pHOF

              Comment


              • Please add the following pitchers to my Personal Hall of Fame

                Credit for all the following information goes to the following and I take none: Baseball Reference, Seamheads, Hall of Stats, Hall of Miller and Eric, The Biographical Encyclopedia of the Negro Baseball Leagues, Beyond the Boxscore, Baseball Guru, Wikipedia, and Fangraphs. Just wanted you guys to know why I'm adding the following pitchers. Let me know what you think or if I missed anyone.

                Pitchers

                Javier Vazquez (Montreal Expos) First off, check out an article by Kazuto Yamazaki titled "Javier Vazquez was unjustifiably omitted from the HOF ballot" from 2016 on Beyond the Boxscore. Vazquez posted five seasons of 200 or more strikeouts and two of 190+. He's 34th all-time with 2,536 in fourteen seasons with 162 in his final year. Baseball Reference credits him with four seasons of 4.0 Wins Above Average or higher. According to Fangraphs, his WHIP and FIP are both considered above average.

                Bob Friend (Pittsburgh Pirates) In 1955, the year before the Cy Young Award, Friend led all of N.L. pitchers in WAR. In the A.L., only Billy Pierce and Early Wynn would score higher. He would go on to have a second place finish and three fourth place finishes in pitching WAR among N.L. hurlers. Sadly, Friend has a losing career record as he pitched for some bad Pirates teams before Danny Murtaugh took the helm. He led the league in games started three times, batters faced twice, and innings pitched twice. He would lead the league in FIP once and finish in the top ten ten times.

                Webster McDonald (Philadelphia Stars) He's a member of the Hall of Miller and Eric so check out what they say about him; they project him with a 63.6 WAR. Besides the obvious Negro League omission of Dick Redding he may be next in line among Negro League Hurlers.

                Stephen Strasburg *Future* (Washington Nationals) On pace for 3,000 strikeouts or close to it; Strasburg won the 2019 World Series MVP. His strikeout to walk ratio is currently 4th all-time and he's fourth among active pitchers in WHIP and FIP.

                Connie Marrero (Alemendares Scorpions) He didn't get to pitch in the Majors until age 39 and threw a one-hitter at age 41. He would help Cuba win the Amateur World Series in 1939, '40 (Series MVP), and '42. Before reaching the majors he would pitch a no hitter for the Washington Senators Minor League affiliate Havana Cubans, pitch a record 44 scoreless innings, and be named MVP for the Florida International League. He also won an MVP in the Cuban Winter League with a record 8 shutouts.

                Eiji Sawamura (Tokyo Kyojin) One of the first great Japanese pitchers; the Sawamura Award given to the greatest pitchers in Japanese baseball is named after him. Possibly pitched the first no-hitter in Japanese Baseball and is credited with pitching three in total. Credited with striking out Ruth and Gehrig in an exhibition.

                Hideo Fujimoto (Yomiuri Giants) He is credited with the first perfect game in Japanese Baseball and the lowest career ERA of 1.90. Won three ERA titles and pitched a record 19 shutouts in 1943. Posted a career 200-87 record.

                Tsuneo Horiuchi (Yomiuri Giants) Won three Sawamura Awards which are given to the best pitchers. Pitched a no-hitter and belted three homers in the same game. He won the 1972 MVP and made nine All-Star teams.

                Camilo Pascual (Minnesota Twins) Led the A.L. in pitching WAR twice when the Cy Young Award was awarded to only one pitcher. He led the league in strikeouts three years in a row. Also led the league in strikeouts and complete games three times.

                David Wells (Toronto Blue Jays) He's a member of the Hall of Stats just making it with a rating of 100. He pitched a perfect game on a couple hours of sleep from out partying the night before in 1998. Led the league with the lowest walk rate four times. Won the 1998 ALCS MVP and has a solid 53.6 career WAR.

                Bill Holland (Detroit Stars) A long career in the Negro League Holland threw 173 complete games according to Seamheads and his given a projected 61.9 WAR on the Hall of Miller and Eric. Seamheads gives him a 128 ERA+ pitching with the Detroit Stars. Reported to lack an overpowering fastball he would use great control to fool batters with his fastball and curveball.

                Ryohei Hasegawa (Hiroshima Carp) Suffered a career losing record pitching for bad teams despite a career 2.65 ERA and two seasons with a sub 1.85 ERA. Made seven All-Star teams and apparently had two deliveries using a submarine and sidearm style.

                Keishi Suzuki (Kintetsu Buffaloes) Pitched a long twenty year career with the Buffaloes winning 317 games and hurling 3,061 strikeouts. Led the league in strikeouts from 1967-70 (eight times total).

                Dave Barnhill (New York Cubans) A strikeout pitcher, Barnhill led the 1941 Negro National League, 1940-41 Puerto Rican Winter League, and the 1947-78 Cuban Winter League in strikeouts. He is credited with 15 strikeouts in a cuban game. Seamheads credits him with a serious 138 ERA+ for the New York Cubans.

                Ramon Bragana (Veracruz Blues) Posted 211 wins and 219 complete games in the Mexican League. Helped the Veracruz Blues win four titles. In 1941-42 Cuban Winter Ball posted 39 2/3 scoreless innings.

                Carlos Royer (Habana) According to Seamheads, Royer spent most of his time ruling the mound with Habana. He would produce a 161 ERA+ for them and a career 134 ERA+ with all of his teams combined. A 57.9 projected WAR on the Hall of Miller and Eric.

                Walter Ball (Chicago Giants) Would help his teams in Minnesota and North Dakota win championships as the only black player on the team. Known as a great spitball pitcher and perhaps his best work was with the Chicago Leland Giants where he produced a 208 ERA+.

                Rogelio Garcia (Monclova Acereros) The all-time modern strikeout leader in Cuba with 2,499. Won 11 strikeout titles and two MVP's. Pitched two no-hitters in the 1987 Selective Series.

                Paul Derringer (Cincinnati Reds) Known for a strange wind up and good control he would have a total of nine top-four finishes in FIP and nine top-five finishes in walk ratio. Helped St. Louis win the World Series in 1931 and Cincinnati in 1940.

                Sam McDowell (Cleveland Indians) Five strikeout titles, three FIP titles, two pitching WAR titles, six strikeout ratio titles (25th all-time), plenty of black ink here to go around.

                Comment


                • Originally posted by Stieb37 View Post
                  Paul Derringer (Cincinnati Reds) Known for a strange wind up and good control he would have a total of nine top-four finishes in FIP and nine top-five finishes in walk ratio. Helped St. Louis win the World Series in 1931 and Cincinnati in 1940.
                  I recall Bucky Walters crediting Derringer as the difference maker on those 1939-40 pennant winning Reds teams.
                  "It is a simple matter to erect a Hall of Fame, but difficult to select the tenants." -- Ken Smith
                  "I am led to suspect that some of the electorate is very dumb." -- Henry P. Edwards
                  "You have a Hall of Fame to put people in, not keep people out." -- Brian Kenny
                  "There's no such thing as a perfect ballot." -- Jay Jaffe

                  Comment


                  • Originally posted by Stieb37 View Post
                    Please add the following pitchers to my Personal Hall of Fame

                    Credit for all the following information goes to the following and I take none: Baseball Reference, Seamheads, Hall of Stats, Hall of Miller and Eric, The Biographical Encyclopedia of the Negro Baseball Leagues, Beyond the Boxscore, Baseball Guru, Wikipedia, and Fangraphs. Just wanted you guys to know why I'm adding the following pitchers. Let me know what you think or if I missed anyone.

                    Pitchers

                    Javier Vazquez (Montreal Expos) First off, check out an article by Kazuto Yamazaki titled "Javier Vazquez was unjustifiably omitted from the HOF ballot" from 2016 on Beyond the Boxscore. Vazquez posted five seasons of 200 or more strikeouts and two of 190+. He's 34th all-time with 2,536 in fourteen seasons with 162 in his final year. Baseball Reference credits him with four seasons of 4.0 Wins Above Average or higher. According to Fangraphs, his WHIP and FIP are both considered above average.

                    Bob Friend (Pittsburgh Pirates) In 1955, the year before the Cy Young Award, Friend led all of N.L. pitchers in WAR. In the A.L., only Billy Pierce and Early Wynn would score higher. He would go on to have a second place finish and three fourth place finishes in pitching WAR among N.L. hurlers. Sadly, Friend has a losing career record as he pitched for some bad Pirates teams before Danny Murtaugh took the helm. He led the league in games started three times, batters faced twice, and innings pitched twice. He would lead the league in FIP once and finish in the top ten ten times.

                    Webster McDonald (Philadelphia Stars) He's a member of the Hall of Miller and Eric so check out what they say about him; they project him with a 63.6 WAR. Besides the obvious Negro League omission of Dick Redding he may be next in line among Negro League Hurlers.

                    Stephen Strasburg *Future* (Washington Nationals) On pace for 3,000 strikeouts or close to it; Strasburg won the 2019 World Series MVP. His strikeout to walk ratio is currently 4th all-time and he's fourth among active pitchers in WHIP and FIP.

                    Connie Marrero (Alemendares Scorpions) He didn't get to pitch in the Majors until age 39 and threw a one-hitter at age 41. He would help Cuba win the Amateur World Series in 1939, '40 (Series MVP), and '42. Before reaching the majors he would pitch a no hitter for the Washington Senators Minor League affiliate Havana Cubans, pitch a record 44 scoreless innings, and be named MVP for the Florida International League. He also won an MVP in the Cuban Winter League with a record 8 shutouts.

                    Eiji Sawamura (Tokyo Kyojin) One of the first great Japanese pitchers; the Sawamura Award given to the greatest pitchers in Japanese baseball is named after him. Possibly pitched the first no-hitter in Japanese Baseball and is credited with pitching three in total. Credited with striking out Ruth and Gehrig in an exhibition.

                    Hideo Fujimoto (Yomiuri Giants) He is credited with the first perfect game in Japanese Baseball and the lowest career ERA of 1.90. Won three ERA titles and pitched a record 19 shutouts in 1943. Posted a career 200-87 record.

                    Tsuneo Horiuchi (Yomiuri Giants) Won three Sawamura Awards which are given to the best pitchers. Pitched a no-hitter and belted three homers in the same game. He won the 1972 MVP and made nine All-Star teams.

                    Camilo Pascual (Minnesota Twins) Led the A.L. in pitching WAR twice when the Cy Young Award was awarded to only one pitcher. He led the league in strikeouts three years in a row. Also led the league in strikeouts and complete games three times.

                    David Wells (Toronto Blue Jays) He's a member of the Hall of Stats just making it with a rating of 100. He pitched a perfect game on a couple hours of sleep from out partying the night before in 1998. Led the league with the lowest walk rate four times. Won the 1998 ALCS MVP and has a solid 53.6 career WAR.

                    Bill Holland (Detroit Stars) A long career in the Negro League Holland threw 173 complete games according to Seamheads and his given a projected 61.9 WAR on the Hall of Miller and Eric. Seamheads gives him a 128 ERA+ pitching with the Detroit Stars. Reported to lack an overpowering fastball he would use great control to fool batters with his fastball and curveball.

                    Ryohei Hasegawa (Hiroshima Carp) Suffered a career losing record pitching for bad teams despite a career 2.65 ERA and two seasons with a sub 1.85 ERA. Made seven All-Star teams and apparently had two deliveries using a submarine and sidearm style.

                    Keishi Suzuki (Kintetsu Buffaloes) Pitched a long twenty year career with the Buffaloes winning 317 games and hurling 3,061 strikeouts. Led the league in strikeouts from 1967-70 (eight times total).

                    Dave Barnhill (New York Cubans) A strikeout pitcher, Barnhill led the 1941 Negro National League, 1940-41 Puerto Rican Winter League, and the 1947-78 Cuban Winter League in strikeouts. He is credited with 15 strikeouts in a cuban game. Seamheads credits him with a serious 138 ERA+ for the New York Cubans.

                    Ramon Bragana (Veracruz Blues) Posted 211 wins and 219 complete games in the Mexican League. Helped the Veracruz Blues win four titles. In 1941-42 Cuban Winter Ball posted 39 2/3 scoreless innings.

                    Carlos Royer (Habana) According to Seamheads, Royer spent most of his time ruling the mound with Habana. He would produce a 161 ERA+ for them and a career 134 ERA+ with all of his teams combined. A 57.9 projected WAR on the Hall of Miller and Eric.

                    Walter Ball (Chicago Giants) Would help his teams in Minnesota and North Dakota win championships as the only black player on the team. Known as a great spitball pitcher and perhaps his best work was with the Chicago Leland Giants where he produced a 208 ERA+.

                    Rogelio Garcia (Monclova Acereros) The all-time modern strikeout leader in Cuba with 2,499. Won 11 strikeout titles and two MVP's. Pitched two no-hitters in the 1987 Selective Series.

                    Paul Derringer (Cincinnati Reds) Known for a strange wind up and good control he would have a total of nine top-four finishes in FIP and nine top-five finishes in walk ratio. Helped St. Louis win the World Series in 1931 and Cincinnati in 1940.

                    Sam McDowell (Cleveland Indians) Five strikeout titles, three FIP titles, two pitching WAR titles, six strikeout ratio titles (25th all-time), plenty of black ink here to go around.
                    This is a great write up. I have learned about many international players and contributors I knew little about before you started sharing. Thank you!

                    Comment


                    • Originally posted by jjpm74 View Post

                      This is a great write up. I have learned about many international players and contributors I knew little about before you started sharing. Thank you!
                      Seconded, great post Stieb.
                      Jacquelyn Eva Marchand (1983-2017)
                      http://www.tezakfuneralhome.com/noti...uelyn-Marchand

                      Comment


                      • Originally posted by Jar of Flies View Post

                        Seconded, great post Stieb.
                        Glad you guys got something out of it. More to come with some position players, executives, managers, contributors, pioneers. The pitchers list is probably the longest.

                        Comment


                        • Originally posted by Chadwick View Post
                          I recall Bucky Walters crediting Derringer as the difference maker on those 1939-40 pennant winning Reds teams.
                          I went back and forth with him for a while but I like where the stats point and your comments reinforce my decision.

                          Comment


                          • Originally posted by jjpm74 View Post

                            This is a great write up. I have learned about many international players and contributors I knew little about before you started sharing. Thank you!
                            Thank you for reading it. More to follow!

                            Comment


                            • Please add the following catchers to my Personal Hall of Fame:

                              Credit for all of the information goes to the following and I take none: Baseball Reference, Seamheads, Wikipedia, "Wizardry" by Michael A. Humphries, The Hall of Miller and Eric, "The Biographical Encyclopedia of the Negro Baseball Leagues."

                              Duke Farrell C (Washington Senators) Michael A. Humphries ranked him ninth all-time among catchers in the defensive metric book "Wizardry." Baseball Reference credits him with +85 fielding runs and leading the league three times in Range Factor/Game as a catcher. In 1891 Farrell would still catch but play third base more (3rd in Range Factor/Game at 3B). He would lead the league in homers, RBI's, and have a slash line of .302/.384/.474. His 5.5 WAR would be second that year to teammate Dan Brouthers.

                              Regino Garcia C (Almendares Scorpions) A member of the Cuban Baseball Hall of Fame; Garica is credited with a 141 OPS+ and 122 stolen bases across all levels of competition on Seamheads. They also credit him with a 153 OPS+ for his main team, Almendares. He also batted .287 overall, as mainly a catcher, which is pretty good.

                              Bruce Petway C (Chicago American Giants) Probably one of the greatest defensive catchers of all-time. Although his offense appears lackluster; if you look on Seamheads, years where he has more at bats he appears to do better. Thus it took him a while to turn it on.
                              They also give him 101 stollen bases and he led the 1912 Cuban Winter League in stolen bases with 20. He reportedly threw out the Georgia Peach three times in an exhibition game. He comes up short to the Hall of Miller and Eric but as a reliable catcher for the era. I'm crediting him extra as a great baserunner and if given the opportunity, at least an average bat. Think of him as Yadi but with more speed.

                              John Clapp (Philadelphia Athletics) An 1870's star catcher, probably a notch behind Cal McVey offensively but a better fielder. However he was better at walking with a ratio of 112/51 to McVey's 30/51. To me if you want 1870's guys in the Hall of Fame both are essential as catchers are concerned.

                              Antonio Maria Garcia (Almendares Scorpions) Another member of the Cuban Hall of Fame. There's not much on him statistically but Baseball Reference talks about him as possibly the best Cuban player of the 19th Century. He also won four Cuban Batting Titles and it's rumored John McGraw wanted to sign him.

                              Gervasio Gonzalez (Almendares Scorpions) Seamheads gives him a .370 career on-base with Almendares and overall a solid 117 OPS+ for all of his teams. He apparently could fly around the bases, swiping 134. Nicknamed "Strike" for his rifle arm and was the longtime battery mate of Cooperstown Member Jose Mendez. Basically when you read about him it states that he's one of the best Cuban catchers all-time or was the greatest of his era.

                              Takeshi Doigaki (Osaka Tigers) Baseball Reference talks about him as the best post World War II era catcher in Japan. He won six straight Best Nine Awards from 1947-52, recognized as his league's top catcher during that time. He batted over .320 and eclipsed a .380 OBP three times each. His strikeout to walk ratio was 482/298.

                              Comment


                              • Please add the following first basemen to my Personal Hall:

                                Credit for all of the following information goes to Seamheads, Baseball Reference, Baseball Guru, and Wikipedia.

                                Kihachi Enomoto (Daimai Orions) At age 18, in 1955, Enomoto would debut with 84 runs and a .298/.410/.473 slash line.
                                In 18 seasons his career slash line would be a tremendous .298/.386/.458 and he he would have a walk to strikeout ratio of 1062/645. According to Baseball Reference he was named to 12 All-Star teams, won 2 batting titles, achieved nine Best Nine Awards, and played in a pitcher friendly era. He's also a member of the Japanese Baseball Hall of Fame.

                                Julian Castillo (Habana) Seamheads credits the Cuban star with a 176 OPS+ across all levels of competition. In the Cuban Winter League Castillo won four batting titles and led the league in doubles seven times. Playing in the Deadball Era he would hit two homers twice in the same game against Hall of Famer Jose Mendez. The Hall of Miller and Eric estimates him with 22 Wins Above Average having incomplete data Ben Taylor is at 26 WAA with more data.

                                Kazuhiro Kiyohara (Seibu Lions) A modern star of Japanese Baseball, Kiyohara smashed 525 homers and drove in 1,530 RBI's. His career slash line is an exceptional .272/.389/.520. According to Baseball Reference, he made 17 All-Star teams, is fifth in homers, third in walks, and is all-time HBP leader.

                                Hector Espino (Monterrey Sultanes) He blasted 453 homers in the Mexican League and is credited with the most in Minor League Baseball history. Won back to back MVP's (at least 6 in total) and 13 batting titles in the Mexican Pacific League. Supposedly the only player in that league with a career BA of over .300.

                                Antonio Munoz (Cienfuegos Elephants) The Cuban star played from the 1960's-90's and was a two-time MVP of the Amateur World Series. He led the league nine times in walks and is the all-time Cuban walk leader and intentional walk leader. Munoz would also claim eight home run titles and blast over 300 homers. HIs career slash line is a deadly .302/.439/.535.

                                Angel Castro (Tampico Lightermen) A great Mexican League Star, Castro played with the likes of Gibson and Willie Wells, maintaining his star status. He was part of five championship teams and won the Triple Crown in 1951. At retirement he was the all-time Mexican League home run leader which has since been broken. He was also the 1952-53 MVP of the winter Mexican Pacific League.

                                Alonzo Perry (Mexico City Red Devils) Perry was a star in the Dominican and Mexican Leagues. In the Dominican he would set a record for a 32 game hitting streak and bat .400 in 1951. He would win home run crowns in both '52 and '53 and a Batting Title in 1957. In the Mexican League he won two Batting Titles and a Triple Crown with an excellent slash line there of .355/.433/.589. He would score 648 runs in 832 games in Mexico.

                                Comment

                                Ad Widget

                                Collapse
                                Working...
                                X