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  • GiambiJuice
    replied
    If Griffey retired 6 years ago, he's in the hall now. No brainer.

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  • dgarza
    replied
    150 more HRs?
    10 more triples?
    Maintaining .293?
    I don't see it.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sockeye
    replied
    Ken Griffey Jr

    He's 36 and in his 18th season. I would like to get some thoughts on his career thus far and if possible some insight on where you think his career totals will end up? I know this calls for a lot of speculation. So I'll be the first to throw some projections out there.

    I think he could very well end up with

    Games 2750
    At-Bats 10,184
    Runs 1818
    Hits 2981
    Doubles 556
    Triples 46
    Home Runs 693
    RBI's 1987
    Stolen Bases 230
    Walks 1343
    AVG .293
    OBP .377
    SLG .561

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  • Dudeman
    replied
    Ken Griffey falls into that catagory called "man he was great but man he could have been so much greater." ala Mickey Mantle.........

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  • four tool
    replied
    Originally posted by ElHalo
    The good that men do is quickly and easily forgotten; the bad lingers on forever. Simple fact of life.
    RIIIIGHT!!!!!!!!
    That's why Ruth's Yankees are remember more for their WS wins than losses.

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  • Cougar
    replied
    There are five major league centerfielders that are plainly better than Griffey: Cobb, Mays, Mantle, DiMaggio, Speaker (not necessarily in that order, although that's a plausible one). For the record, there is no shame in being behind that collection of talent -- not just the top five CF ever, but probably among the top 15-20 players at any position.

    Charleston, who played exclusively in the Negro Leagues, probably belongs in that group as well, although I don't know Negro League history well, so I'd be happy to defer to someone who does as to what his exact placement should be.

    Additionally, Duke Snider is often mentioned in these comparisons as being roughly equivalent to Griffey; some like Junior better, some like the Duke. I favor Griffey myself, but it's debatable.

    So Griffey tops out at #6, and might be as low as #8 if Charleston and Snider are ahead of him.

    That's still puts Griffey in the upper echelon of Hall of Famers, just not quite at the very top.

    Leave a comment:


  • DTF955
    replied
    Right, not only that but if you add DiMaggio or Charleston in (not to mention both, let's just say one) you have 4 ahead of Griffey Jr. anyway; the problem worsens in some other positions. RF, for instance, you could make a very good argument for 4 (Ruth, Aaron, Frank Robinson for sure, and probably Mel Ott, who was good enough to lay 3rd) who were better than Griffey Jr., which means theremay have to be one position where you can only have one better than him.

    These averages make things real complex, real fast.

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  • leecemark
    replied
    --IF you think he is one of the top 2-3 catchers ever, then you can make an argument for him as top 20 all time. That wasn't what the previous argument was though. It was if there are 3 better CF than Griffey then more than two better players at any other posiiton would add to be too many guys for Griffey to make the top 20. I think its close as to whether Griffey or Piazza have had better careers anyway.

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  • GiambiJuice
    replied
    Originally posted by DTF955
    Let's see, even if you ranked him 4th, with 3 position players above him, the math shows that there can only be 2 other players at *each position* better than Griffey Jr. - 2 are allowed 3 - for him to be in the top 20 all time. That's hard for anyone to do.
    Does that mean that since piazza is one the the top 2-3 all around catchers, that makes him a top-20 all time player?

    Leave a comment:


  • DTF955
    replied
    ElHalo, as an Angel fan, should think of Reggie as an Angel, though it might give him nightmares. I do, too, to tell you the truth - that great 1982, the first year I followed baseball, when the Angels almost went tot he Series. And then 1986, the 9th inning, his arm around Gene Mauch in the dugout, grinning proudly thinking of how that great manager was *finally* going to make the World Series, what might have made one of the classy sports photos of all time, and shown Reggie as more than just a hot dog but helped people realize there was more than just slugger to him, there wa a caring human being there, too. Then...well, I won't bring up the past :-)

    I think of Griffey Jr. as a Mariner because he's played so *little* for the Reds. Mays, I think of for the catch in '54 and various other comments on his ability (like the quote "the only man who could have caught that ball had just hit it" in one book.) Seaver, with the Mets, b/c that's where he got his fame. Ruth, I think of as a Yankee.

    Perry, I think of with that funny old-timers game uniform with 8 different logos sewn on it. LOL, what a picture.

    I ranked him 6-8th best CF of all time. Let's see, even if you ranked him 4th, with 3 position players above him, the math shows that there can only be 2 other players at *each position* better than Griffey Jr. - 2 are allowed 3 - for him to be in the top 20 all time. That's hard for anyone to do.

    BTW, you forgot Hank Aaron; someone could have a career in their late 30s like that again. However, I think Aaron's was partly due to his new park in Atlanta. (I think he would have set the record anyway, but in mid''75 or something, had the Braaves stayed. Again, he only played half his games there for 9 years. Take away 2-3 a yeaar, he stil makes it. But, it would have been tougher.))

    Leave a comment:


  • Captain Cold Nose
    replied
    Originally posted by RuthMayBond
    Slumps come and slumps go, but the curses of Herb Score and Rocky Colavito live on forever :grouchy
    I am sure you wish Mays was really remembered for his play in the 1973 W.S. and not the catch he made off of Vic Wertz in 1954. Greatest play or not, that is the play that is always replayed.
    Focus on the negative, and that's what you get. Myopia is not contagious.

    Leave a comment:


  • julusnc
    replied
    Originally posted by ElHalo
    The good that men do is quickly and easily forgotten; the bad lingers on forever. Simple fact of life.
    Not always true.

    In sports fans tend to remember the high spots.


    Johnny Unitas will always be "Mr High Tops" and a Legend.No one cares he was a Charger QB/QB coach for two seasons.

    Babe Ruth will always be remembered as "The Bambino" and a Legend.No one cares he was a Boston Brave.

    Pete Rose will always be "Charlie Hustle" and a Baseball great......He will continue to get standing ovations for what he did on the field until the day he dies...........

    Also works in Politics -

    John F Kennedy was a President with terrible foreign policies but is remembered favorable today............


    People tend to remember the high spots of course that is what is taught in school history classes today.

    Leave a comment:


  • moviegeekjan
    replied
    Originally posted by ElHalo
    Mays gets a Met tag because the defining moment of his career was him flopping around on the ground like a dead fish in the 73 Series.
    ??

    I've NEVER heard anyone before claim this. Very narrow and sad perspective if this is the only vison of Mays. Far more remember the glory years and would cite "the Catch" as his defining moment (even if born long after that time)

    Leave a comment:


  • RuthMayBond
    replied
    Slumps come and slumps go, but the curses of Herb Score and Rocky Colavito live on forever :grouchy

    Leave a comment:


  • julusnc
    replied
    Glory is fleeting but Legends live on forever.

    - Grantland Rice

    Leave a comment:

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