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Election 71-75

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  • #31
    --Fame plays a role for me, but not a huge one. The larger subjective factor is historical significance. Did the player do something that changed the game? Was he really great at something that makes him unique - i.e. did he set records and/or lead the league in important categories. Does he have some none playing acomplishments that boost his place in the game. The Hall of Fame is only partially about honoring great players. It also should tell the story of the game's history. Players who contribute more to that narrative get a boost from me and those who were quietly put up great careers not so much. I believe that is the spirit of this project, but obviosly how much of a boost and which players deserve it is going to vary considerably from voter to voter.

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    • #32
      1) Harmon Killebrew
      2) Buck Ewing
      3) Bullet Joe Rogan
      4) Robin Roberts
      5) Billy Hamilton
      6) Martin DiHigo
      7) Eddie Murray
      8) Frankie Frisch
      9) Carlton Fisk
      10) Old Hoss Radbourne

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      • #33
        Originally posted by BigRon View Post
        Good post, DoubleX- similar to comments I made in post 26. One caveat- Vaughan may have been around a top 40 position player, based on more modern thinking, but when you mix in the top pitchers he certainly is lower- probably no higher than the mid- 50s- almost exactly where he was spotted.
        I think if one were so inclined, based just on performance it would be plausible to make an argument for Vaughan to move past or at least be closely grouped with the following positional players we've ranked ahead of him:

        13) Jackie Robinson
        25) Cap Anson
        34) Yogi Berra
        35) Cal Ripken
        37) Pop Lloyd
        41) Roberto Clemente
        45) Hank Greenberg
        46) Dan Brouthers
        49) Ed Delahanty
        50) Johnny Mize
        51) Al Kaline
        52) Turkey Stearnes
        53) Wade Boggs
        54) Charlie Gehringer
        55) Mickey Cochrane
        56) Reggie Jackson

        So that's 16 without counting pitchers. Now I'm not saying I would put Vaughan ahead of these players, but I think an argument could be made.

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        • #34
          Originally posted by leecemark View Post
          --Fame plays a role for me, but not a huge one. The larger subjective factor is historical significance. Did the player do something that changed the game? Was he really great at something that makes him unique - i.e. did he set records and/or lead the league in important categories. Does he have some none playing acomplishments that boost his place in the game. The Hall of Fame is only partially about honoring great players. It also should tell the story of the game's history. Players who contribute more to that narrative get a boost from me and those who were quietly put up great careers not so much. I believe that is the spirit of this project, but obviosly how much of a boost and which players deserve it is going to vary considerably from voter to voter.
          I like this line of thinking although my voting has not reflected it much. This is why both King Kelly and Monte Ward were recently slotted top 70 players all time. In Kelly's case, it's not that he was famous during his time; rather that he was one of the first real stars of the sport, and a bit of a pioneer. Just being famous shouldn't cut it, IMO. At best it should give a minor bump.

          I'm strongly considering giving Fred Clarke a boost. He is the definitive player/manager in terms of success. Who's with me?
          http://gifrific.com/wp-content/uploa...-showalter.gif

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          • #35
            Less than two days left in this election. So far, turnout seems a little down.

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            • #36
              Originally posted by DoubleX View Post
              Less than two days left in this election. So far, turnout seems a little down.
              It might be because of Thanksgiving is just around the corner.

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              • #37
                I'll try to post by tomorrow.

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                • #38
                  Originally posted by leecemark View Post
                  --Fame plays a role for me, but not a huge one. The larger subjective factor is historical significance.
                  Well, as the first SS to really be a huge HR hitter, the first MVP from a really bad team, and also the only player in history to be known as MISTER (insert team's name), he was pretty significant historically. He even contributed his famous "let's play two" to baseball lore.

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                  • #39
                    My apologies for delay in voting. I have taken the Vaughan and Blyleven remarks to heart about fame versus value and have used a modifier to my rankings to include the ELO rater by baseball-reference.com, as I have a difficult time assigned fame to a player. This greatly benefits George Sisler, Bill Terry, Ralph Kiner, Harmon Killebrew, and Paul Molitor, where it hurts unelected Wes Ferrell, Heinie Groh, Kevin Appier, Rick Reuschel, and the elected Rich Gossage.

                    I did not use the ELO rater for negro leaguers, and 19th century players, as the former aren't incorporated, and the later are severely underrated in general.
                    I made a conscious effort to bump 19th century players who were elected early in the BBWAA years (pre 1946), and a bump down for players that haven't been elected to the hall of fame.

                    Special cases called for special rankings, so jumps were given to Jackie Robinson, Larry Doby (color barrier breakers), and to pioneers like John Ward for forming the Players League, etc. I gave a small bump to guys with all-time crowns (Hank Aaron, RBI, etc.) too.

                    The ELO rater wasn't harsh against Arky Vaughan, with a placement of 73, and Bert Blyleven at 74, so they dropped only a few spots from my statistical rankings. Blyleven moves below Martin Dihigo and Bullet Joe Rogan because of this.

                    I appreciate the discussion, and will continue to monitor and update my rankings if arguments strike me as convincing.

                    NEWLY minted rankings:
                    1. Carlton Fisk
                    2. Martin Dihigo
                    3. Gary Carter
                    4. Bullet Joe Rogan
                    5. Bert Blyleven
                    6. Robin Roberts
                    7. Luke Appling
                    8. Paul Waner
                    9. Billy Hamilton
                    10. Gaylord Perry

                    Top 10 ineligible:
                    Jeff Bagwell
                    Bill Dahlen
                    Alan Trammell
                    Jacquelyn Eva Marchand (1983-2017)
                    http://www.tezakfuneralhome.com/noti...uelyn-Marchand

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                    • #40
                      We haven't done much with guys who contributed in ways beyond their play. OK, we've got John Ward. I take it we're including all his contributions, not just those during his playing career. We've got some guys with real success as managers, like Frank Chance, Fred Clarke, and Hughie Jennings to name three. If fame is important, so is being the manager of a World Champion or pennant winner.
                      Seen on a bumper sticker: If only closed minds came with closed mouths.
                      Some minds are like concrete--thoroughly mixed up and permanently set.
                      A Lincoln: I don't think much of a man who is not wiser today than he was yesterday.

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                      • #41
                        That's why I brought Clarke's name up. He could be top 100 material as is, but along with his success as player/manager he would bump into my current ballot somewhere. Frank Chance with his player/manager credit would distance himself from the lower pack. Hughie Jennings... well, he was only player/manager because of a couple at-bats but he did enjoy success as manager. Red Schoendienst managed after he retired but also picked up 1000 managerial wins, two pennants and a championship.
                        http://gifrific.com/wp-content/uploa...-showalter.gif

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                        • #42
                          1. Robin Roberts
                          2. Paul Waner
                          3. Harmon Killebrew
                          4. Whitey Ford
                          5. Willie McCovey
                          6. Al Simmons
                          7. Eddie Murray
                          8. Juan Marichal
                          9. Mordecai Brown
                          10. John Clarkson

                          Comment


                          • #43
                            This election is over and parity is really starting to take over. Here are the results:

                            1) Eddie Murray - 67 (57 points, 10 votes; 3 first place)
                            2) Bullet Rogan - 59 (50 points, 9 votes)
                            3) Harmon Killebrew - 57 (49 points, 8 votes; 1 first place)
                            4) Buck Ewing - 56 (48 points, 8 votes; 2 first place)
                            5) Billy Hamilton - 49 (42 points, 7 votes)

                            6) Robin Roberts - 45 (38 points, 7 votes; 1 first place)
                            7) John Clarkson - 44 (37 points, 7 votes; 1 first place)
                            8) Juan Marichal - 42 (37 points, 5 votes)
                            9) Paul Waner - 39 (33 points, 6 votes)
                            10) Carlton Fisk - 38 (33 points, 5 votes; 1 first place)
                            11) Gaylord Perry - 37 (31 points, 6 votes)
                            12) Al Simmons - 36 (31 points, 5 votes)
                            13) Martin Dihigo - 34 (28 points, 6 votes)
                            14) Mordecai Brown - 29 (23 points, 6 votes)
                            15) Phil Niekro - 29 (26 points, 3 votes; 2 first place)
                            16) Willie McCovey - 28 (24 points, 4 votes)
                            17) Gary Carter - 27 (24 points, 3 votes)
                            18) Whitey Ford - 23 (20 points, 3 votes; 1 first place)
                            19) Frankie Frisch - 18 (14 points, 4 votes)
                            20) Buck Leonard - 18 (16 points, 2 votes)
                            21) Eddie Plank - 17 (14 points, 3 votes)
                            22) Bert Blyleven - 15 (13 points, 2 votes)
                            23) Fergie Jenkins - 14 (11 points, 3 votes)
                            24) Dennis Eckersley - 13 (11 points, 2 votes)
                            25) Jesse Burkett - 12 (10 points, 2 votes)
                            26) Joe Medwick - 10 (9 points, 1 vote)
                            27) Tim Keefe - 9 (7 points, 2 votes)
                            t28) Bill Dickey - 9 (8 points, 1 vote)
                            t28) Willie Stargell - 9 (8 points, 1 vote)
                            30) Luke Appling - 5 (4 points, 1 vote)
                            t31) Joe Cronin - 4 (3 points, 1 vote)
                            t31) Harry Heilmann - 4 (3 points 1 vote)
                            t33) Paul Molitor - 3 (2 points, 1 vote)
                            t33) Brooks Robinson - 3 (2 points, 1 vote)
                            t35) Jim Palmer - 2 (1 point, 1 vote)
                            t35) Charles Radbourn - 2 (1 point, 1 vote)
                            t35) Ozzie Smith - 2 (1 point, 1 vote)
                            t35) Jud Wilson - 2 (1 point, 1 vote)

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