Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Orioles BBF franchise HOF second chance round

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Orioles BBF franchise HOF second chance round

    This will be one of three second chance round elections this week. What we'll do for the second chance election is a Yes/No vote requiring the greater of 6 or 75% of the votes to induct. The election will be limited to the listed nominees. The elections will only be open for a week--but there will be at least three or four days for discussion and new nominations. You can abstain from an entire ballot (player or contributor), but if you vote in that portion of the ballot, only the guys you expressly vote yes for get credit for a positive vote. The others in that section of the ballot will be considered to have gotten a "no" vote. There will be no limits on how many nominees you can vote for . I will also provide the nomination discussions for the nominees. The deadline for suggesting nominees is twelve hours before the election begins.


    In this case, the election will not begin until Saturday, April 21 at 7 am EDT, and will end at 7 am EDT April 28. Nominations close 12 hours before the election begins, or April 20 at 7 pm EDT. Ballots not cast within the stated election time frame will not count.


    The Orioles have the following already inducted:

    - Inducted Players (18): Brady Anderson, Mark Belanger, Paul Blair,Harlond Clift, Bobby Grich, Eddie Murray, Mike Mussina, Jim Palmer, Boog Powell, Cal Ripken Jr, Brooks Robinson, Frank Robinson, Urban Shocker, Ken Singleton, George Sisler, Vern Stephens, Bobby Wallace, Ken Williams

    - Inducted Contributors (1): Earl Weaver

    The list of nominees at present is:

    Players
    Roberto Alomar
    Mike Cuellar
    Doug DeCinces
    Mike Flanagan
    Ned Garver
    Chris Hoiles
    Dave Johnson
    Dave McNally
    Rafael Palmiero
    Jack Powell
    George Stone
    Gus Triandos
    Hoyt Wilhelm

    Contributors
    George Bamberger
    Hank Bauer
    Harry Dalton
    Bill DeWitt
    Jerry Hoffberger
    Ray Miller
    Hank Peters
    Paul Richards
    Luke Sewell
    Chuck Thompson
    Last edited by jalbright; 04-19-2012, 03:13 PM.
    Seen on a bumper sticker: If only closed minds came with closed mouths.
    Some minds are like concrete--thoroughly mixed up and permanently set.
    A Lincoln: I don't think much of a man who is not wiser today than he was yesterday.

  • #2
    George Stone is yet another who received at least 50% of the vote, and so does not need a second.

    He's the third best player in the majors in WAR in the period 1904-08, behind only Honus Wagner and Nap LaJoie. He was the in the top 10 in WAR among position players, and the very best in his league in 1906. He was in the top 10 in average 4 times, in the top 10 in OBP three times, in the top 10 in slugging three times, in the top 10 in runs scored 4 times, in the top 10 in walks drawn 3 times, and in the top 10 in OPS+ 4 times. In short, he was an elite player for a span of four or five years, one of the very best in the game. It's not enough for Cooperstown, but it should be enough for the Oriole/Brown franchise hall.
    Seen on a bumper sticker: If only closed minds came with closed mouths.
    Some minds are like concrete--thoroughly mixed up and permanently set.
    A Lincoln: I don't think much of a man who is not wiser today than he was yesterday.

    Comment


    • #3
      Paul Wendt mentioned this for Ray Miller as a contributor for the Orioles:
      from Ray Miller at wikipedia
      >>It was announced March 22, 2010 that Miller will be inducted into the Baltimore Orioles Hall of Fame. Press release from mlb.com: "Miller will be enshrined for his work as a pitching coach with the Orioles. He had three stints with the Birds in that role - 1978-85, 1997 and 2004-05.
      <<
      Seen on a bumper sticker: If only closed minds came with closed mouths.
      Some minds are like concrete--thoroughly mixed up and permanently set.
      A Lincoln: I don't think much of a man who is not wiser today than he was yesterday.

      Comment


      • #4
        DoubleX had this to say about Bill DeWitt as a contributor for the Orioles:

        Originally posted by Beady View Post
        I see Bill DeWitt has gotten a number of votes and Luke Sewell none at all. Can I ask why that is?

        I often find it difficult to decide whether the manager of a winning team or the general manager or GM-equivalent should get more credit.
        Bill DeWitt was with the organization I believe for over 20 years, and perhaps as much as 30, rising through the organization in various capacities before becoming general manager and I believe a part owner for about 15 years. So I think he played a much bigger role in the organization, especially given the length of his service, than Sewell did during his six year managerial run.
        Seen on a bumper sticker: If only closed minds came with closed mouths.
        Some minds are like concrete--thoroughly mixed up and permanently set.
        A Lincoln: I don't think much of a man who is not wiser today than he was yesterday.

        Comment


        • #5
          hwmongoose made this pitch for Chuck Thompson as a contributor for the Orioles:
          Originally posted by hwmongoose View Post
          Contributors:
          Chuck Thompson, longtime radio announcer extraordinaire
          Seen on a bumper sticker: If only closed minds came with closed mouths.
          Some minds are like concrete--thoroughly mixed up and permanently set.
          A Lincoln: I don't think much of a man who is not wiser today than he was yesterday.

          Comment


          • #6
            Here's JW's case for Dave McNally for the Orioles:
            Originally posted by J W View Post
            McNally is not favored by the WAR system (21.2 WAR in 13 seasons) but then, none of the pitchers for the Baltimore Orioles in their glory years are. McNally is a consummate Oriole having spent nearly his entire career there. He won 183 games for the Orioles at a .616 clip, sported a proud 3.18 ERA (108 ERA+), a 1.203 WHIP and was durable, starting over 30 games eight times (averaging 226 IP per 162 games). He has three top-five CYA finishes, getting as close as 2nd in 1970. He also finished 5th in MVP voting in 1968, his best season (152 ERA+, 0.842 WHIP!). What seals the deal is his postseason performance: 14 games (12 started), 7-4, 2.49 ERA, 1.096 WHIP and four World Series appearances (winning twice).
            Seen on a bumper sticker: If only closed minds came with closed mouths.
            Some minds are like concrete--thoroughly mixed up and permanently set.
            A Lincoln: I don't think much of a man who is not wiser today than he was yesterday.

            Comment


            • #7
              Jack Powell
              24.7 pWAR (4th in franchise history)
              2.63 ERA (7th)
              117 W (8th)
              1.152 WHIP (13th)
              1.962 BB/9 (4th)
              294 GP (18th)
              2229.7 IP (4th)
              884 SO (9th)
              264 GS (7th)
              210 CG (2nd)
              27 SHO (4th)
              1.819 SO/BB (22nd)
              8901 BF (5th)
              *** Submit your personal HOF as your ballot for the Single Ballot BBF Hall of Fame! *** Also: Buck the Fraves!

              Comment


              • #8
                Luke Sewell (for contributor)
                850 games managed (4th in franchise history)
                432 wins (4th)
                0.513 W-L% (7th)
                1 AL pennant (1944) -- this is the Browns, mind you
                *** Submit your personal HOF as your ballot for the Single Ballot BBF Hall of Fame! *** Also: Buck the Fraves!

                Comment


                • #9
                  Nominate Paul Richards

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by hwmongoose View Post
                    Nominate Paul Richards
                    If you want him nominated, you or someone else will have to present the case why he belongs in the Oriole Hall. It doesn't take a lot, as you can see from posts 3, 4 and 8.
                    Seen on a bumper sticker: If only closed minds came with closed mouths.
                    Some minds are like concrete--thoroughly mixed up and permanently set.
                    A Lincoln: I don't think much of a man who is not wiser today than he was yesterday.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Paul Richards

                      Richards should certainly be nominated as he was the original architect of the Orioles, serving as both general manager and field manager for the team in their first seven years since moving from St Louis. He moved on to the fledgeling Colt 45s after the 1961 season. Under Richards' watch, the Orioles gathered and developed much of the talent that blossomed in the 1960s, concentrating on strong pitching and defense.
                      Last edited by J W; 04-17-2012, 02:09 AM.
                      http://gifrific.com/wp-content/uploa...-showalter.gif

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Hank Bauer

                        Bauer enjoyed a brief but successful stint at manager for the Orioles from 1964-1968. His teams won 90 games four out of those five seasons, with their peak performance being a stunning sweep of the Dodgers in the 1966 World Series. Unfortunately for him, his service was terminated in favor of one Earl Weaver.
                        http://gifrific.com/wp-content/uploa...-showalter.gif

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Harry Dalton

                          Dalton is one of the five names I voted for last time as a contributor. He was general manager of the Orioles from 1966 to 1971. Under his watch, the Orioles went to four World Series, winning twice. He brokered the deal for Frank Robinson, hired Earl Weaver, and maintained the success in scouting and development that made the Orioles the team with the highest winning percentage for over two decades.
                          http://gifrific.com/wp-content/uploa...-showalter.gif

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Hank Peters

                            Peters is one of the five names I voted for last time as a contributor. He was general manager of the Orioles from 1975 to 1987. If Paul Richards represents the beginning and Harry Dalton the middle of the Orioles dynasty, Peters represents the end. Under his watch the team went to two World Series, winning once. Peters probably had the stiffest competition of the three, butting heads against George Steinbrenner's Yankees along with the Red Sox of the 70s, Brewers of the late 70s-early 80s and Tigers of the 80s. After the 1983 season when they won their last World Series, the team took a nose dive under relatively new ownership of Edward Bennett Williams, and Peters' track record suffered for it.
                            http://gifrific.com/wp-content/uploa...-showalter.gif

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              George Bamberger

                              Another of my former votes... Bamberger was the predecessor to Ray Miller. He was pitching coach for Earl Weaver's Oriole teams from 1968 to 1977. Under his 20-year watch, Baltimore Oriole pitchers won 20 games in a season 18 times, including a fabled 4 times in one season in 1971. His pitchers also captured four Cy Young Awards (Jim Palmer three times and Mike Cuellar once). Many people in the business consider Bamberger the best pitching coach they ever saw.
                              http://gifrific.com/wp-content/uploa...-showalter.gif

                              Comment

                              Ad Widget

                              Collapse
                              Working...
                              X