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  • Dan Haren

    So far in his career, Dan Haren is 107-85 with a 3.60 ERA and 119 ERA+, winning at least 15 games three times. The consistent three-time All-Star has led the league in games started three times, K/BB ratio three times (he is first among active pitchers in that category), pitcher fielding percentage three times and WHIP once. He has finished in the top 10 in Cy Young voting twice, peaking at fifth in the balloting.

    All-time, Haren is 4 in K/BB ratio (behind only Pedro Martinez, Curt Schilling and Tommy Bond), 49th in K/9 IP, 69th in BB/9 IP and 91st in WHIP. Among active pitchers, he is second in BB/9 IP (behind Roy Halladay), sixth in WHIP and 16th in ERA.

    Though he has faltered from time to time, Haren is usually a solid postseason performer - in seven games (two starts), he is 2-0 with a 3.26 ERA. In the 2004 World Series, Haren posted a 0.00 and in the 2004 NLDS, he posted a 0.00 ERA while averaging more than a strikeout per inning and earning a win. He earned his other win in a well-pitched game in the 2006 ALDS.

    Haren has even shown that he can hit - in 260 at-bats, he has a .227 batting average, which is tied for eighth best among active pitchers with at least 100 plate appearances. His 2010 was a season for the ages, as he hit .364 with one home run and six doubles in 55 at-bats. In 2009, with Arizona, he had 10 RBI.

    Statistically, Haren is most similar to Alex Fernandez, Jake Peavy, Bryn Smith, Ralph Terry, Shane Reynolds, Justin Verlander, Moose Haas, Larry Jansen, Cliff Lee and Steve Blass. On his list of most similar pitchers through age 32, Hall of Famer Jim Bunning is there at #8. On the Fan EloRater, Haren ranks # 258, ahead of John Lackey, Bruce Hurst and Josh Johnson, but behind Curt Davis, Mark Gubicza and Sonny Siebert.

    Career projections (using Bill James' Favorite Toy):

    189 W
    148 L
    470 G
    459 GS
    4 GF
    32 CG
    11 SHO
    3095 IP
    2908 H
    1298 R
    1206 ER
    612 BB
    2736 K
    3.51 ERA

    So, what do you think about Dan Haren? When he retires, should he make the Hall of Fame? Does he have Hall of Fame potential?
    23
    Yes
    0.00%
    0
    No
    73.91%
    17
    Maybe
    0.00%
    0
    Not a Hall of Famer, but he has Hall of Fame potential
    4.35%
    1
    Not a Hall of Famer, but he had Hall of Fame potential at one point
    21.74%
    5
    Last edited by Cowtipper; 09-29-2013, 02:32 PM.

  • #2
    He had HoF potential. Probably too late for him to throw together a HoF career now.
    "No matter how great you were once upon a time — the years go by, and men forget,” - W. A. Phelon in Baseball Magazine in 1915. “Ross Barnes, forty years ago, was as great as Cobb or Wagner ever dared to be. Had scores been kept then as now, he would have seemed incomparably marvelous.”

    Comment


    • #3
      Will Haren have a better or worse case than Beckett?

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Cowtipper View Post
        Will Haren have a better or worse case than Beckett?
        Worse based on public perception/exposure but in terms of who is the better pitcher, it's close. I'd take Haren. Neither should be in the HoF.
        Last edited by bluesky5; 04-24-2012, 12:32 PM.
        "No matter how great you were once upon a time — the years go by, and men forget,” - W. A. Phelon in Baseball Magazine in 1915. “Ross Barnes, forty years ago, was as great as Cobb or Wagner ever dared to be. Had scores been kept then as now, he would have seemed incomparably marvelous.”

        Comment


        • #5
          Duplicate post.
          Last edited by bluesky5; 04-24-2012, 12:32 PM.
          "No matter how great you were once upon a time — the years go by, and men forget,” - W. A. Phelon in Baseball Magazine in 1915. “Ross Barnes, forty years ago, was as great as Cobb or Wagner ever dared to be. Had scores been kept then as now, he would have seemed incomparably marvelous.”

          Comment


          • #6
            I keep on waiting for this guy to turn the corner--he keeps showing shades of greatness, but always ends up undoing any progress he makes. Last year he had one heck of a season and this year he has been thoroughly mediocre. It wouldn't be impossible for him to work his way to 200 wins, but he really needs to become more consistent.

            Comment


            • #7
              The only way I see him going in is if he becomes a lights out closer like Dennis Eckersley.
              "(Shoeless Joe Jackson's fall from grace is one of the real tragedies of baseball. I always thought he was more sinned against than sinning." -- Connie Mack

              "I have the ultimate respect for Whitesox fans. They were as miserable as the Cubs and Redsox fans ever were but always had the good decency to keep it to themselves. And when they finally won the World Series, they celebrated without annoying every other fan in the country."--Jim Caple, ESPN (Jan. 12, 2011)

              Comment


              • #8
                He's two different pitchers during a season. Pre-All Star break, he's a very solid top of the rotation guy. After the AS game, he's simply average at best. His inability to put together full seasons strong leaves a bad taste in one's mouth.
                "Chuckie doesn't take on 2-0. Chuckie's hackin'." - Chuck Carr two days prior to being released by the Milwaukee Brewers

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Cowtipper View Post
                  Will Haren have a better or worse case than Beckett?
                  Beckett has the 20 win season and a higher peak.
                  "I do not care if half the league strikes. Those who do it will encounter quick retribution. All will be suspended and I don't care if it wrecks the National League for five years. This is the United States of America and one citizen has as much right to play as another. The National League will go down the line with Robinson whatever the consequences. You will find if you go through with your intention that you have been guilty of complete madness."

                  NL President Ford Frick, 1947

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Fuzzy Bear View Post
                    Beckett has the 20 win season and a higher peak.
                    I don't think either will have much a case after this season, alas.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      He seems to pitch well against the Mets so I thought I would re-visit this and his BR page. Yikes 9-13 5.02 ERA 75 ERA+ after a 12-13 4.33 88. Looking back he seems more like a guy that was perpetual trade bait. 2-3 years per team then off he goes. He was good but never legit A list good. 14-16 wins. Peak ERA+ was Oak/Ariz 138, 138, 142. That's nice but that's all. He has led the league in GS (whoopee) Whip 1x and K/BB 3x (nice but more of a quirky stat in some respects). He has a lot of top tens in K (2,3 being the best). He was two, yes two, top tens in ERA+ and WAR for pitchers 6,4 in 2008 and 2009 respectively. By standard numbers he was 3rd in ERA in 2007, 7th and 4th in W in 2008 and 2011, 9th in WL% in 2009. The question might be was he ever really as good as his reputation?

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Haren will be 33 next year. He's had kind of he career Curt Schilling had up through age 33, maybe a little better. At age 34, Schilling began his run of great seasons that propelled him from Frank Lary Land to the Land of Potential HOF Milk and Honey. Like Schilling, Haren has been regarded as an exceptional talent who has disappointed somewhat. Haren's hopes for the HOF depend on him being Schilling II; he'll need at least two (2) 20-win seasons to make the HOF. He'll also need either (A) a Cy Young Award, or (B) the kind of WS heroics Shilling supplied in lieu of a Cy Young Award.

                        I don't know if Haren can do this. The overwhelming majority of pitchers DON'T do this, but some do. Schilling isn't the only late bloomer; Jamie Moyer, Wilbur Wood, Jim Kaat, Tommy John, and (to some degree) Gaylord Perry were all late bloomers. Haren has had a bad year this year, but Schilling was nearly given up for dead when he began his big run with Arizona. We'll see, I guess. I don't expect Haren to surge to the HOF, but of all the guys his age, he's one of the most likely to do that.
                        "I do not care if half the league strikes. Those who do it will encounter quick retribution. All will be suspended and I don't care if it wrecks the National League for five years. This is the United States of America and one citizen has as much right to play as another. The National League will go down the line with Robinson whatever the consequences. You will find if you go through with your intention that you have been guilty of complete madness."

                        NL President Ford Frick, 1947

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          At this point, I don't really see Haren doing much to put together a Hall of Fame career. After an excellent three-year span from 2007 to 2009, he's fallen off and posted a mediocre ERA+ of 99 since. He has 129 career wins at age 32 - only nine Hall of Fame pitchers had that many wins or fewer by that age.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            The 33-year-old Haren added 13 victories and 145 strikeouts to his resume, bringing his career totals to 142 and 1,881, respectively. I wouldn't be surprised if he reached 200 wins and 2,500 Ks in his career - but would that be enough for a guy like him, someone who hasn't posted an ERA+ over 90 since 2011? In my view, the answer is no.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Dan Haren, though only 34 years old, will retire after the postseason. His final season ended with a 11-9 record, a 3.60 ERA and only 38 walks in 187 1/3 innings.

                              He finishes his career with a 153-131 record, 2,013 strikeouts, a 3.75 ERA, three All-Star selections, two top-10 Cy Young finishes and a top-five Cy Young finish.

                              Will he get a vote for the Hall when his time comes?

                              Comment

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