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  • Dodgers BBF Franchise HOF, second chance election

    This will be one of two second chance round elections begun this week. What we'll do for the second chance election is a Yes/No vote requiring the greater of 6 or 75% of the votes to induct. The election will be limited to the listed nominees. The elections will only be open for a week--but there will be at least three or four days for discussion and new nominations. You can abstain from an entire ballot (player or contributor), but if you vote in that portion of the ballot, only the guys you expressly vote yes for get credit for a positive vote. The others in that section of the ballot will be considered to have gotten a "no" vote. There will be no limits on how many nominees you can vote for . I will also provide the nomination discussions for the nominees.

    In this case, the election will not begin until Saturday, June 30 at 7 am EDT, and will end at 7 am EDT July 7. Nominations close 43 hours before the election begins, or June 28 at noon EDT. Ballots not cast within the stated election time frame will not count.


    The Dodgers have the following already inducted:

    - Inducted Players (27): Dolph Camilli, Roy Campanella, Ron Cey, Willie Davis, Don Drysdale, Carl Furillo, Steve Garvey, Jim Gilliam, Burleigh Grimes, Pedro Guerrero, Orel Hershiser, Gil Hodges, Burt Hooton, Sandy Koufax, Davey Lopes, Van Lingle Mungo, Don Newcombe, Claude Osteen, Mike Piazza, Johnny Podres, Pee Wee Reese, Pete Reiser, Jackie Robinson, Preacher Roe, Nap Rucker, Jimmy Sheckard, Duke Snider, Don Sutton, Fernando Valenzuela, Dazzy Vance, Dixie Walker, Bob Welch, Zack Wheat, Maury Wills

    - Inducted Contributors (7): Walter Alston, Red Barber, Buzzie Bavasi, Al Campanis, Leo Durocher, Charlie Ebbetts, Tommy Lasorda, Branch Rickey, Wilbert Robinson, Vin Scully

    The list of nominees at present is:

    Players
    Dusty Baker
    Jake Daubert
    Eric Gagne
    Mike Griffin
    Billy Herman
    Brickyard Kennedy
    Clem Labine
    Ramon Martinez
    Andy Messersmith
    Raul Mondesi
    Wes Parker
    Ron Perranoski
    Jeff Pfeffer
    John Roseboro
    Bill Russell
    Steve Sax
    Mike Scioscia
    Gary Sheffield
    Reggie Smith
    Whit Wyatt

    Contributors
    Ned Hanlon
    Jaime Jarrin
    Walter O'Malley
    Last edited by jalbright; 06-29-2012, 06:00 PM.
    Seen on a bumper sticker: If only closed minds came with closed mouths.
    Some minds are like concrete--thoroughly mixed up and permanently set.
    A Lincoln: I don't think much of a man who is not wiser today than he was yesterday.

  • #2
    There were two posts discussing Walter O'Malley

    Originally posted by jalbright View Post
    Walter O'Malley for the Dodgers as a contributor

    I know why he hasn't been elected: the animosity of those who remember the Brooklyn Dodgers fondly. I get it. If this were a Brooklyn or Brooklyn Dodger Hall of Fame, he wouldn't belong. But this is for the Dodger franchise. He did try to work with New York City to get a suitable stadium site to replace Ebbetts Field, but got more resistance than cooperation. Arguably, had he stayed, the franchise would have suffered. All that is argument, though. What is fact is that the decisions he made led to a great deal of success for the franchise, 4 World Championships and 13 pennants while he led the club. What decisions was he a part of that led to that success, other than the move to the West Coast? To name a few:

    -Hiring Buzzie Bavasi as GM;
    -Hiring Walter Alston as manager, then Tommy Lasorda;
    -arranging the building of Dodger Stadium;
    -creating the Vero Beach complex for spring training in Florida;
    -hiring Vin Scully as team broadcaster; and
    -being the first MLB team to broadcast in Spanish.

    He was the Sporting News Executive of the Year in 1955.

    The team was undeniably successful during his stewardship, and he deserves a fair share of the credit for it. He belongs in the Dodger Hall of Fame.
    Originally posted by EdTarbusz View Post
    Vero Beach was devised by Branch Rickey. O'Malley was initially against it because of the cost. It's also debatable whether O'Malley had anything to do with the hiring of Vin Scully. Scully began broadcasting for the Dodgers in 1950. O'Malley didn't become head of the Dodgers until 1951.

    That said Walter O'Malley belongs in any Dodgers Hall of Fame: Brooklyn or Los Angeles.
    Seen on a bumper sticker: If only closed minds came with closed mouths.
    Some minds are like concrete--thoroughly mixed up and permanently set.
    A Lincoln: I don't think much of a man who is not wiser today than he was yesterday.

    Comment


    • #3
      I'm going to present a case for Jake Daubert, which won't require a second as he's already gotten over 50% of the vote in an election for the franchise.

      According to WAR, Daubert was the second best NL 1B four times while with the Dodgers, and was third three times. Two of those three third place finishes were by the tiny margin of 0.2, or about two runs. Bottom line is, he was all-star quality at least six years with the franchise, and I think that's enough to deserve a spot in the team HOF.
      Seen on a bumper sticker: If only closed minds came with closed mouths.
      Some minds are like concrete--thoroughly mixed up and permanently set.
      A Lincoln: I don't think much of a man who is not wiser today than he was yesterday.

      Comment


      • #4
        Here's three nominees for the Dodgers:

        Originally posted by BigRon View Post
        Quick pitches for Labine, Perranoski, Roseboro.

        Clem Labine played 11 seasons for the Dodgers. He was a quality reliever the entire time, His 113 ERA+ doesn't seem that impressive, but relievers were used differently in the 50s. Labine AVERAGED more than 2 IP per game, and started a number of times in pressure situations- usually with good results.

        Ron Perranoski had a 132 ERA+ in 8 seasons as a Dodger. He also frequently pitched multiple innings, and led the NL 3 times in games pitched. He was a significant component of the Dodgers' success in the 60s.

        John Rseboro was a high quality catcher for the Doodgers for 11 seasons, late 50s through late 60s. A good defender and a decent hitter- his stats appear depressed due to the pitchers' era he played in. Roseboro was also a team leader for the Dodgers in those days. He was a 3X all star and 2X Gold Glove winner with the Dodgers.
        Seen on a bumper sticker: If only closed minds came with closed mouths.
        Some minds are like concrete--thoroughly mixed up and permanently set.
        A Lincoln: I don't think much of a man who is not wiser today than he was yesterday.

        Comment


        • #5
          Another Dodger nominee:

          Originally posted by jjpm74 View Post
          The case for Jaime Jarrin as a contributor:

          Jaime Jarrin is the the Spanish sportscasting world what Vin Scully and Harry Caray are to the English speaking broadcasting world. During Jarrin's 54 years with the Dodgers, he has

          called over 4000 games
          transcribed road games on the fly for 14 years early on
          received the Ford C. Frick award in 1998
          received several prestigious awards for his Spanish speaking announcing

          Jarrin is someone who at least deserves a second look, IMO and is someone who has had an important role with the Dodgers since they moved to Los Angeles.
          Originally posted by jjpm74 View Post
          This is what wikipedia has to say about Jarrin's accolades:

          In 1998, Jarrín received the Ford C. Frick Award from the Baseball Hall of Fame, becoming the second Spanish-language broadcaster to receive that award, joining Mets and Yankees announcer, Buck Canel. The Dodgers are the only team with two Hall of Fame announcers, English language announcer Vin Scully being the other. In February 1998, Jarrin was the first recipient of the Southern California Broadcaster Association's President's Award. Also in 1998, he was honored by the National Association of Hispanic Journalists with their highest award, and received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

          In 2002, Jarrin was inducted into the California Broadcasters Association Hall of Fame and in 2003, into the Hispanic Heritage Baseball Museum. He received the 2003 Foreign Language Sports Broadcaster Award from the Southern California Sports Broadcasters inducted into the Southern California Sports Broadcaster's Hall of Fame. Jarrin was honored again by the SCSB with the foreign-language broadcaster of the year award in 2003, 2004, 2005, 2007 and 2008. In 2009, he was honored by the Society of St. Vincent DePaul for his commitment to changing the lives of at-risk youth in the community.

          He has also received La Gran Cruz al Merito en El Grado de Comendador (the highest civilian medal) from his native Ecuador in January 1992. In 1990 he was named as one of the top 100 Influential Hispanics in the United States by Hispanic Business Magazine. In 1970, he was the first Latin American to win the Golden Mike Award, which he received again in 1971. In 2000, he spoke at the MLB Rookie Development seminar, which is designed to prepare top minor league prospects for the Major Leagues.
          The caveat here is that while he is unquestionably one of the most important Spanish radio broadcasters in the US history of radio, a lot of attention comes from what he has done for the community and some of it comes from his role as a Spanish broadcaster outside of the Dodgers organization. I myself am on the fence with him, but he at least deserves some attention and discussion here.
          Seen on a bumper sticker: If only closed minds came with closed mouths.
          Some minds are like concrete--thoroughly mixed up and permanently set.
          A Lincoln: I don't think much of a man who is not wiser today than he was yesterday.

          Comment


          • #6
            I'll put up the case for Ned Hanlon as a contributor for the Dodgers. Yet again, this case requires no second as he reached the 50% vote mark.

            Ned Hanlon won two consecutive pennants in his first two years as manager of the team, in an era when there was only one league (1899 and 1900). He also finished second in the NL in 1902. That's a nice run within four years, and I think it deserves induction into the Dodger hall of fame here.
            Seen on a bumper sticker: If only closed minds came with closed mouths.
            Some minds are like concrete--thoroughly mixed up and permanently set.
            A Lincoln: I don't think much of a man who is not wiser today than he was yesterday.

            Comment


            • #7
              Wes Parker
              A "life-long" Dodger, Wes Parker was known as one of the best defensive 1B of his day.

              .267/.351/.375
              111 OPS+
              20.9 WAR

              1972 ML Lou Gehrig Memorial Award

              6 straight Gold Gloves
              1967 NL (1B)
              1968 NL (1B)
              1969 NL (1B)
              1970 NL (1B)
              1971 NL (1B)
              1972 NL (1B)

              Parker was named to the Rawlings All-Time Gold Glove Team in 2007.

              Putouts as 1B
              1970 NL 1,498 (1st)

              Range Factor/Game as 1B
              1970 NL 10.08 (1st)

              Fielding % as 1B
              1965 NL .997 (1st)
              1966 NL .992 (2nd)
              1967 NL .996 (2nd)
              1968 NL .999 (1st)
              1969 NL .995 (3rd)
              1970 NL .996 (1st)
              1971 NL .996 (3rd)
              1972 NL .997 (1st)

              Comment


              • #8
                Dusty Baker
                Baker peaked during the early 80s when with the Dodgers.
                From 1980-1982, he was a .300+ batter with a 130+ OPS+.

                .281/.343/.437
                144 HRs
                1144 Hits
                117 OPS+

                1977 NL NLCS MVP
                Code:
                                                                                       
                Year   Series Opp Rslt G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB   BA  OBP  SLG   OPS
                1977     NLCS PHI    W 4 16 14 4 5  1  0  2   8  2 .357 .438 .857 1.295
                All-Star Games
                1981 *
                1982 *

                Gold Gloves
                1981 NL (OF)

                Silver Sluggers
                1980 NL (OF)
                1981 NL (OF)

                For decades, conventional wisdom was that the first high five occurred between Dusty Baker and Glenn Burke of the Los Angeles Dodgers on Oct. 2, 1977 in Dodger Stadium.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Eric Gagne
                  161 Saves - Dodger All Time Leader
                  125 ERA+

                  2003 NL Cy Young

                  2003 NL TSN Pitcher of the Year

                  2003 NL Rolaids Relief
                  2004 NL Rolaids Relief

                  All-Star Games
                  2002 *
                  2003 *
                  2004 *

                  Saves
                  2002 NL 52 (2nd)
                  2003 NL 55 (1st)
                  2004 NL 45 (3rd)

                  From the BR Bullpen :
                  It seemed at that point that Eric Gagné was ready to settle in as a full-time member of the Dodger starting rotation, but fate intervened. His manager in spring training of 2002, Jim Tracy, decided to make him his closer. To say that he took well to his new job would be a major understatement. From 2002-2004, he managed to pitch exactly 82 1/3 innings in each of the three years. During that stretch, he was the most dominating relief pitcher in the Major Leagues, saving 52 games with an ERA under 2.00 the first season, then turning in one of the greatest seasons ever by a relief pitcher in 2003. He saved 55 games in 55 opportunities to lead the National League, allowed a mere 37 hits for the season, and struck out 137 batters while walking only 20. He earned the nickname "Game Over", as he was almost untouchable when he stepped on the mound. With his hulking physique, unkempt hair, black goatee and goggles, he was an extremely intimidating presence on the mound, and a favorite of Dodger Stadium fans. He was voted the winner of the National League Cy Young Award in 2003, while making the All-Star team for the second of three consecutive years. His success continued into 2004, when he saved 43 games while going 7-3, 2.19. He pitched in the postseason for the first time in his career, allowing 1 hit in three innings of work in the NLDS.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Bill Russell
                    A career Dodger of 18 seasons (mostly SS, some OF), he played 2181 games with the team, 2nd most, behind Zack Wheat.

                    .263/.310/.338
                    1926 Hits
                    28.6 WAR

                    6th in Career Dodger Hits
                    Code:
                                                     
                    Rk          Player    H From   To
                    1       Zack Wheat 2804 1909 1926
                    2    Pee Wee Reese 2170 1940 1958
                    3     Willie Davis 2091 1960 1973
                    4      Duke Snider 1995 1947 1962
                    5     Steve Garvey 1968 1969 1982
                    6     Bill Russell 1926 1969 1986
                    7     Carl Furillo 1910 1946 1960
                    8      Jim Gilliam 1889 1953 1966
                    9       Gil Hodges 1884 1943 1961
                    10     Maury Wills 1732 1959 1972
                    Bill Russell played in 10 different post-season series, doing very well in several of those series.
                    Code:
                                                                                                
                    Year   Series  Opp Rslt  G  PA  AB  R  H 2B 3B HR RBI BB   BA  OBP  SLG  OPS
                    1974     NLCS  PIT    W  4  19  18  1  7  0  0  0   3  1 .389 .421 .389 .810
                    1978     NLCS  PHI    W  4  18  17  1  7  1  0  0   2  1 .412 .444 .471 .915
                    1978       WS  NYY    L  6  28  26  1 11  2  0  0   2  2 .423 .464 .500 .964
                    1981     NLCS  MON    W  5  19  16  2  5  0  1  0   1  1 .313 .353 .438 .790
                    5 Yrs (10 Series)       49 209 194 14 57  5  3  0  19 11 .294 .332 .351 .682
                    All-Star Games
                    1973 *
                    1976 *
                    1980 (SS)

                    Russell is one of the best defensive SSs the Dodgers have ever seen, suggested by WAR Runs Fielding
                    Code:
                                                        
                    Rk           Player Rfield From   To
                    1     Pee Wee Reese    117 1940 1958
                    2      Bill Russell     73 1969 1986
                    3     Germany Smith     68 1885 1897
                    4    Tommy Corcoran     54 1892 1896
                    5       Bill Dahlen     52 1899 1911
                    He was one of the best defensive SSs in the NL 70s & 80s
                    Code:
                                                         
                    Rk            Player Rfield From   To
                    1        Ozzie Smith    189 1978 1989
                    2       Bill Russell     64 1970 1986
                    3    Dave Concepcion     51 1970 1988
                    4           Tim Foli     48 1970 1985
                    5       Chris Speier     34 1971 1989
                    Defensive WAR
                    1973 NL 2.3 (1st)
                    1977 NL 2.6 (1st)

                    Intentional Bases on Balls
                    1974 NL 25 (1st)

                    Assists as SS
                    1973 NL 560 (1st)

                    Total Zone Runs as SS
                    1973 NL 11 (1st)

                    Total Zone Runs as OF
                    1970 NL 12 (1st)

                    Range Factor/9Inn as SS
                    1972 NL 5.40 (1st)

                    Range Factor/Game as SS
                    1972 NL 5.26 (1st)

                    Russell also managed the Dodgers in the 90s for a few years:
                    Code:
                                                                                         
                    Rk   Year Age                  Tm          Lg   G   W   L W-L% Finish
                    1    1996  47 Los Angeles Dodgers NL 2nd of 2  86  49  37 .570      2
                    2    1997  48 Los Angeles Dodgers          NL 162  88  74 .543      2
                    3    1998  49 Los Angeles Dodgers NL 1st of 2  74  36  38 .486      3
                                                          3 years 322 173 149 .537    2.3
                    Last edited by dgarza; 06-27-2012, 05:44 AM.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Raul Mondesi
                      Mondesi was the first Dodger 30-30 man.

                      .288/.334/.504
                      163 HRs
                      122 OPS+
                      20.2 WAR

                      1994 NL Rookie of the Year

                      All-Star Games
                      1995 *

                      Gold Gloves
                      1995 NL (OF)
                      1997 NL (OF)

                      Putouts as RF
                      1996 NL 337 (1st)
                      1997 NL 336 (1st)

                      Assists as RF
                      1994 NL 16 (1st)
                      1995 NL 13 (1st)

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Whit Wyatt
                        80-45 = .640
                        2.86 ERA
                        128 ERA+
                        1.141 WHIP
                        19.7 pWAR
                        21.3 Total WAR

                        All-Star Games
                        1939
                        1940 *
                        1941 (P)
                        1942

                        Wyatt has one of the best ERA+ and WHIP in Dodger history (500+ IPs)
                        Code:
                                                                   
                        Rk             Player ERA+     IP From   To
                        1         Kevin Brown  147  872.2 1999 2003
                        2     Clayton Kershaw  136  824.2 2008 2012
                        3      Ron Perranoski  132  766.2 1961 1972
                        4        Sandy Koufax  131 2324.1 1955 1966
                        5    Andy Messersmith  129  926.0 1973 1979
                        6         Dazzy Vance  129 2757.2 1922 1935
                        7          Whit Wyatt  128 1072.1 1939 1944
                        8          Jim Brewer  127  822.0 1964 1975
                        9          Eric Gagne  125  545.1 1999 2006
                        10       Jeff Pfeffer  125 1748.1 1913 1921
                        Code:
                                                                    
                        Rk             Player  WHIP     IP From   To
                        1         Kevin Brown 1.100  872.2 1999 2003
                        2    Andy Messersmith 1.105  926.0 1973 1979
                        3        Sandy Koufax 1.106 2324.1 1955 1966
                        4          Eric Gagne 1.111  545.1 1999 2006
                        5          Don Sutton 1.123 3816.1 1966 1988
                        6       Rube Marquard 1.127  950.0 1915 1920
                        7          Jim Brewer 1.129  822.0 1964 1975
                        8        Jeff Pfeffer 1.134 1748.1 1913 1921
                        9          Whit Wyatt 1.141 1072.1 1939 1944
                        10       Don Drysdale 1.148 3432.0 1956 1969

                        Wins Above Replacement
                        1941 NL 7.7 (1st)

                        WAR for Pitchers
                        1941 NL 6.7 (1st)

                        Wins
                        1941 NL 22 (1st)

                        Win-Loss %
                        1943 NL .737 (1st)

                        Walks & Hits per IP
                        1941 NL 1.058 (1st)
                        1943 NL 1.007 (1st)

                        Hits per 9 IP
                        1943 NL 6.924 (1st)

                        Shutouts
                        1940 NL 5 (1st)
                        1941 NL 7 (1st)

                        Strikeouts / Base On Balls
                        1941 NL 2.146 (1st)
                        Last edited by dgarza; 06-27-2012, 08:38 AM.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Steve Sax
                          .282/.339/.356
                          1218 Hits
                          290 Stolen Bases - 5th All Time Dodgers

                          1982 NL Rookie of the Year

                          Silver Sluggers
                          1986 NL (2B)

                          All-Star Games
                          1982 *
                          1983 (2B)
                          1986 *

                          Offensive WAR
                          1986 NL 6.1 (1st)

                          Singles
                          1986 NL 157 (1st)
                          1988 NL 147 (1st)

                          Putouts as 2B
                          1986 NL 367 (1st)

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            The nominations for the second chance election are open until noon EDT tomorrow.
                            Seen on a bumper sticker: If only closed minds came with closed mouths.
                            Some minds are like concrete--thoroughly mixed up and permanently set.
                            A Lincoln: I don't think much of a man who is not wiser today than he was yesterday.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Andy Messersmith
                              Messersmith is most famous for his role in the historic 1975 Seitz decision which led to the downfall of Major League Baseball's reserve clause and ushered in the current era of free agency.

                              55-34 = .618
                              2.67 ERA
                              43 Complete Games
                              129 ERA+

                              Gold Gloves
                              1974 NL (P)
                              1975 NL (P)

                              All-Star Games
                              1974 (P)
                              1975

                              Did well in Cy Young voting
                              1974 NL (2, 55%)
                              1975 NL (5, 1%)

                              One of the best ERA+ in Dodger history (500 IPs min.):
                              Code:
                                                                         
                              Rk             Player ERA+     IP From   To
                              1         Kevin Brown  147  872.2 1999 2003
                              2     Clayton Kershaw  136  824.2 2008 2012
                              3      Ron Perranoski  132  766.2 1961 1972
                              4        Sandy Koufax  131 2324.1 1955 1966
                              5    Andy Messersmith  129  926.0 1973 1979
                              6         Dazzy Vance  129 2757.2 1922 1935
                              Wins
                              1974 NL 20 (1st)
                              1975 NL 19 (3rd)

                              Win-Loss %
                              1974 NL .769 (2nd)

                              Walks & Hits per IP
                              1973 NL 1.093 (3rd)
                              1974 NL 1.098 (1st)
                              1975 NL 1.057 (3rd)

                              Hits per 9 IP
                              1973 NL 7.065 (5th)
                              1974 NL 6.989 (2nd)
                              1975 NL 6.827 (1st)

                              Innings Pitched
                              1974 NL 292.3 (2nd)
                              1975 NL 321.7 (1st)

                              Strikeouts
                              1973 NL 177 (5th)
                              1974 NL 221 (2nd)
                              1975 NL 213 (3rd)

                              Complete Games
                              1975 NL 19 (1st)

                              Shutouts
                              1975 NL 7 (1st)

                              Adjusted ERA+
                              1975 NL 149 (2nd)

                              Comment

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