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Curtis Granderson

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  • Curtis Granderson

    Curtis Granderson has been in the major leagues since 2004. Now in his ninth season, he has hit .266 with 192 home runs, 77 triples, 110 stolen bases, 537 RBI and 721 runs scored in 1,056 games. The three-time All-Star has won a Silver Slugger once and earned MVP votes twice, finishing as high as fourth in the balloting.

    The outfielder has led the league in triples twice, runs scored once, RBI once, stolen base percentage once, defensive games at center twice, centerfielder fielding percentage once and CF putouts once. He is also leading the league in runs scored and outfielder fielding percentage this year.

    From 2006 to 2011, he averaged 152 games, 104 runs scored, 12 triples, 26 home runs, 17 stolen bases and 78 RBI a year. He posted an OPS of .840 and an OPS+ of 118 while striking out a lot, averaging 142 whiffs a season.

    He's also performed well in a few playoff series, hitting .455 with three RBI in the 2010 ALDS, .333 with a home run and four runs scored in the 2006 ALCS, .294 with two home runs, three runs and five RBI in the 2006 ALDS and .294 with a home run and three RBI in the 2010 ALCS.

    Statistically, he is similar to Grady Sizemore, Richard Hidalgo, Glenallen Hill, Hank Blalock, Tony Conigliaro, Leon Durham, Jayson Werth, Jim Ray Hart, Jim Lemon and Trot Nixon. Through age 30, his seventh-most similar player is Hall of Famer Larry Doby. He is ranked #369 on the Fan EloRater, ahead of Greg Luzinski, Dusty Baker and Tino Martinez, but behind Jim Sundberg, Larry Gardner and Reggie Sanders.

    So, what do you think about Curtis Granderson? Should he be a Hall of Famer when he retires?
    29
    Yes
    3.45%
    1
    No
    55.17%
    16
    Maybe
    17.24%
    5
    Not a Hall of Famer, but he had Hall of Fame potential
    13.79%
    4
    Not a Hall of Famer, but he had Hall of Fame potential at one point
    10.34%
    3
    Last edited by Cowtipper; 10-11-2013, 06:21 AM.

  • #2
    Too early to tell yet for certain. However, he has the skills necessary to be a Hall of Famer. It's all up to how much he retains as he ages. If he's a smart baserunning, power-hitting outfielder well into his 30s, he might stand a good shot.
    46 wins to match last year's total

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    • #3
      He could, but realistically he needs to get the average up closer to .300. I know average is a stone age measurement but as a matter of perception it still says something. At any rate the 118 OPS+ is not poor but it probably should be his floor rather than his 20s.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by PVNICK View Post
        He could, but realistically he needs to get the average up closer to .300. I know average is a stone age measurement but as a matter of perception it still says something. At any rate the 118 OPS+ is not poor but it probably should be his floor rather than his 20s.
        Every stat has a value of importance; we just have to figure out what the value is. I think a .300 batting average will always carry a lot of weight, even though batting average has been demphasized a little.
        46 wins to match last year's total

        Comment


        • #5
          He has power and is fast. Fun to watch, but not a HOFer in my eyes. If he sticks around another 10 years and continues to do what he's done so far, that perception might change.

          Comment


          • #6
            No, not yet, but he's definitely stepped up his game in the last couple of years. He could conceivably wind up in C-Town.
            They call me Mr. Baseball. Not because of my love for the game; because of all the stitches in my head.

            Comment


            • #7
              Nope. He started playing full time too late in his career and he strikes out too much. His batting average is really low for a HOF outfielder.

              His resume is too short at the age of 31 for him to have even a decent chance.

              The best thing he could have done if he really wanted to make the HOF was to become a Yankee. So he has that going for him.
              Your Second Base Coach
              Garvey, Lopes, Russell, and Cey started 833 times and the Dodgers went 498-335, for a .598 winning percentage. That’s equal to a team going 97-65 over a season. On those occasions when at least one of them missed his start, the Dodgers were 306-267-1, which is a .534 clip. That works out to a team going 87-75. So having all four of them added 10 wins to the Dodgers per year.
              http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p5hCIvMule0

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              • #8
                A weak maybe. He'd have to age very well, win a couple titles (presumably with New York), and get credit for playing a premium defensive position.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Off Topic

                  Did anyone else stop getting emails when subscribed threads update?

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Cougar View Post
                    A weak maybe. He'd have to age very well, win a couple titles (presumably with New York), and get credit for playing a premium defensive position.
                    He's had a power spike, and he's a career CENTER fielder, so this gives him a bit of a boost. On the other hand, he has no Gold Gloves in CF, and isn't really known for his defensive prowess.

                    His lifetime OWP is .611, which is below Jim Rice level. His 2007 season was his best, at .695, and he's become more patient at the plate, but he doesn't hit for much average, and that hurts. His power spike appears real, but he's only got 192 HRs now, and he's 31. His 1st full-time season was at age 25, and he was OK, but not great, and he's always struck out a lot, so he's not likely to age that well. He's got potential, but I doubt he'll make it to the HOF unless his career takes a Jose Cruz-type course.
                    "I do not care if half the league strikes. Those who do it will encounter quick retribution. All will be suspended and I don't care if it wrecks the National League for five years. This is the United States of America and one citizen has as much right to play as another. The National League will go down the line with Robinson whatever the consequences. You will find if you go through with your intention that you have been guilty of complete madness."

                    NL President Ford Frick, 1947

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                    • #11
                      Now playing LF and out for 10 weeks.

                      I would like to see him make it. Who has the lowest BA of a regular in the HoF?
                      "No matter how great you were once upon a time — the years go by, and men forget,” - W. A. Phelon in Baseball Magazine in 1915. “Ross Barnes, forty years ago, was as great as Cobb or Wagner ever dared to be. Had scores been kept then as now, he would have seemed incomparably marvelous.”

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by bluesky5 View Post
                        Now playing LF and out for 10 weeks.

                        I would like to see him make it. Who has the lowest BA of a regular in the HoF?
                        Ray Schalk had a .253 BA. I think he is the lowest non-pitcher.

                        For outfielders, I think Reggie Jackson is the lowest at .262.
                        Last edited by jjpm74; 02-25-2013, 05:02 PM.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by jjpm74 View Post
                          Ray Schalk had a .253 BA. I think he is the lowest non-pitcher.

                          For outfielders, I think Reggie Jackson is the lowest at .262.
                          Ah, Granderson is at .262 and I don't see it going up. I am for Schalk in the hall as I am a fan of putting great defensive catchers in. I don't know if I would favor a player who has less than a .250 BA though. Maybe I have one in DJC's single ballot HoF and didn't realize it though?
                          "No matter how great you were once upon a time — the years go by, and men forget,” - W. A. Phelon in Baseball Magazine in 1915. “Ross Barnes, forty years ago, was as great as Cobb or Wagner ever dared to be. Had scores been kept then as now, he would have seemed incomparably marvelous.”

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            The ten lowest career batting averages among Hall of Fame position players:

                            1 Ray Schalk .253
                            2 Harmon Killebrew .256
                            3 Rabbit Maranville .258
                            4 Bill Mazeroski .260
                            5 Ozzie Smith .262
                            6 Gary Carter .262
                            7 Reggie Jackson .262
                            8 Luis Aparicio .262
                            9 Joe Tinker .262
                            10 Mike Schmidt .267
                            Seen on a bumper sticker: If only closed minds came with closed mouths.
                            Some minds are like concrete--thoroughly mixed up and permanently set.
                            A Lincoln: I don't think much of a man who is not wiser today than he was yesterday.

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                            • #15
                              A healthier Granderson might have a chance but I don't think he will age very well.

                              Comment

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