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  • Hidden HOFers

    So I recently posted in two different threads concerning Heinie Manush, and in doing so, found a HOFer. I had heard the name, but after looking at his stats and finding out he was in the HOF, I was pleasantly surprised.

    So my question to you is, who else do you think are hidden HoFers (by which I mean DESERVING HoFers who never get mentioned).

    My (incomplete) List is:
    -Heinie Manush
    -Eddie Plank (never hear him mentioned, but had 9 seasons of over 5 WAR)
    -Zach Wheat (Frequent top ten candidate in many categories)
    -Edd Roush (15th in all-time triples with 9 top ten finishes including one win)
    “There can be no higher law in journalism than to tell the truth and to shame the devil.” Walter Lippmann

    "Fill in any figure you want for that boy (Mantle). Whatever the figure, it's a deal." - Branch Rickey

  • #2
    I think Ross Youngs was a true hofer. He was a very good man and had a short career like Kirby Puckett. I think he gets underrated due to Frankie Frisch.

    I agree with everyone who you mentioned too.
    "(Shoeless Joe Jackson's fall from grace is one of the real tragedies of baseball. I always thought he was more sinned against than sinning." -- Connie Mack

    "I have the ultimate respect for Whitesox fans. They were as miserable as the Cubs and Redsox fans ever were but always had the good decency to keep it to themselves. And when they finally won the World Series, they celebrated without annoying every other fan in the country."--Jim Caple, ESPN (Jan. 12, 2011)

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    • #3
      Goose Goslin is one of my favorite old time players, and you never hear anything about him. I guess being an exact contemporary of Ruth and Gehrig will do that to a guy. A .316 lifetime average, and over 1600 RBI, including 11 100 RBI seasons (and another at 99). He is a deserving HOFer, and not one that just makes the cut. This guy was a first ballot type. Seemed like the prototype for Al Simmons...and he was just about as good.
      Last edited by willshad; 10-10-2012, 12:43 AM.

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      • #4
        If you were on the lam and wanted to hide out in the hall of fame, you should be a position player in the dead ball era and a defensive specialist who could still play after he could no longer hit. Best if you can do this on a team that doesn't do very much.

        Everyone raves, properly, about Bill Dahlen, perhaps the best player outside the hall. Bobby Wallace is basically the Bill Dahlen who made it inside.
        Indeed the first step toward finding out is to acknowledge you do not satisfactorily know already; so that no blight can so surely arrest all intellectual growth as the blight of cocksureness.--CS Peirce

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        • #5
          Originally posted by chicagowhitesox1173 View Post
          I think Ross Youngs was a true hofer. He was a very good man and had a short career like Kirby Puckett. I think he gets underrated due to Frankie Frisch.

          I agree with everyone who you mentioned too.
          OK, here's a guy who shows up in the running for worst hofer ever--Freddie Lindstrom. I'm not going to try to argue he's a legit hall of famer, just that there's more to him than just Frisch and a 1930 .379 batting average. Lindstrom was a fine young player. By the age of 24, he had 20.7 WAR, ranking 39th all time, just behind Babe Ruth (in position WAR) at 38. Among hofers, he ranked 27th. Then he suffered some debilitating injury I don't really understand, and, while he played on for many years, he only accumulated 5 more WAR by the end of his career. He had to move to the outfield and his offense dwindled. He was injured just as he was about to enter his prime years, and it's not beyond belief that he might have put up even better numbers over the next seven years or so. Then finishing up as an average player, he would have had a solid hof career.

          Of course he didn't do any of those things, and his early years were comparable to Robin Yount, not Willie Mays, but he was a legitimate star until he was hurt, and it's too bad that he's remembered only as an overrated beneficiary of run inflation and cronyism.
          Last edited by Jackaroo Dave; 10-10-2012, 03:28 AM.
          Indeed the first step toward finding out is to acknowledge you do not satisfactorily know already; so that no blight can so surely arrest all intellectual growth as the blight of cocksureness.--CS Peirce

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          • #6
            Manush is a longtime fave. He got tagged as being ' Jose Cardenal' by Bill James 25 years ago, which if you just run the numbers 1905 did in the Manush-Oliver comp-simply doesn't hold up. The less said about 'Babe Herman as Kingman', the better...

            Another hidden Hof: Red Faber. I think he holds up pretty well.

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            • #7
              A lot of the 1800s/1900s guys might fit the above list. Sam Thompson is a good one I think.

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              • #8
                From 1962-1974, who played the most games? The most ABs or PAs? Who had the most hits?

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                • #9
                  Some pitchers:

                  Stan Coveleski
                  Joe McGinnity
                  Ted Lyons
                  Early Wynn
                  1885 1886 1926 1931 1934 1942 1944 1946 1964 1967 1982 2006 2011

                  1887 1888 1928 1930 1943 1968 1985 1987 2004 2013

                  1996 2000 2001 2002 2005 2009 2012 2014 2015


                  The Top 100 Pitchers In MLB History
                  The Top 100 Position Players In MLB History

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by dgarza View Post
                    From 1962-1974, who played the most games? The most ABs or PAs? Who had the most hits?
                    Billy Williams

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                    • #11
                      Another one: Cheif Bender. Doesn't get much play but he was pretty good.

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                      • #12
                        Harry Heilmann

                        Sam Crawford

                        Bobby Wallace

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                        • #13
                          We never seem to talk about Paul Waner here at BBF.

                          Paul Waner 3.jpg

                          Paul Waner 1.jpg

                          Paul Waner 2.jpg
                          Strikeouts are boring! Besides that, they're fascist. Throw some ground balls - it's more democratic.-Crash Davis

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                          • #14
                            Same with Ernie Banks. Somebody mentioned that once before too how Banks rarely gets mentioned.
                            "(Shoeless Joe Jackson's fall from grace is one of the real tragedies of baseball. I always thought he was more sinned against than sinning." -- Connie Mack

                            "I have the ultimate respect for Whitesox fans. They were as miserable as the Cubs and Redsox fans ever were but always had the good decency to keep it to themselves. And when they finally won the World Series, they celebrated without annoying every other fan in the country."--Jim Caple, ESPN (Jan. 12, 2011)

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              2 players who were traded for each other

                              Hoyt Wilhelm is probably the most unhittable pitcher in baseball history. His peak from 62-68 is just incredible. Some of his season stats have to be seen to be believed.

                              Luis Aparicio yes the sabers hate him for his low OPS+. But.. He averaged 144 games a year at SS for 18 seasons, including 6 >154 game seasons. He never played a single inning at any position but shortstop. 10x all star, 8 gold gloves, 9 SB championships in a row, ROY , MVP runner-up
                              He is one of the great shortstops in baseball history
                              Last edited by JR Hart; 10-10-2012, 08:36 PM.
                              This week's Giant

                              #5 in games played as a Giant with 1721 , Bill Terry

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