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How many players received 45% of the Writers' vote but never got in?

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  • How many players received 45% of the Writers' vote but never got in?

    How many players have received 45% (or more) of the BBWAA vote for the Hall in any one year without ever making it in? (Either by a later vote of the Writers or via the Veteran's Committee.)

    (This is not intended as a trivia question, I'm really wondering how often this has happened.)
    Last edited by westsidegrounds; 11-08-2012, 05:08 PM.

  • #2
    Originally posted by westsidegrounds View Post
    How many players have received 45% (or more) of the BBWAA vote for the Hall in any one year without ever making it in? (Either by a later vote of the Writers or via the Veteran's Committee.)

    (This is not intended as a trivia question, I'm really wondering how often this has happened.)
    Off the top of my head, Gil Hodges. I think he got as high as 62% or so, IIRC. [Edit: He peaked at 63.4%; he got better than 45% thirteen out of fifteen years on the ballot]

    There's also guys like Jack Morris and Lee Smith, who are still on the ballot.
    Last edited by Cougar; 11-08-2012, 05:34 PM.

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    • #3
      http://www.baseball-reference.com/aw...-history.shtml

      This will give you the top 8 for each year, usually digging down below 45%. Click on the year link for the full ballot when the top 8 is insufficient.
      Indeed the first step toward finding out is to acknowledge you do not satisfactorily know already; so that no blight can so surely arrest all intellectual growth as the blight of cocksureness.--CS Peirce

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Jackaroo Dave View Post
        http://www.baseball-reference.com/aw...-history.shtml

        This will give you the top 8 for each year, usually digging down below 45%. Click on the year link for the full ballot when the top 8 is insufficient.
        Man, I was looking for something like that...
        46 wins to match last year's total

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        • #5
          There are two that have exhausted their BBWAA eligibility that I see from that source: Hodges and Oliva. There are four I see who are still on the BBWAA ballot: Raines, Lee Smith, Bagwell and Jack Morris.
          Seen on a bumper sticker: If only closed minds came with closed mouths.
          Some minds are like concrete--thoroughly mixed up and permanently set.
          A Lincoln: I don't think much of a man who is not wiser today than he was yesterday.

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          • #6
            Here's a question...

            Miller Huggins received over 45% a few times (1942 & 1945). But was he being considered for total contributions here? Or just as a player at time?

            If he was just being voted on as a player only (which I kind of doubt), then he would be an example of a player who received 45% but never never got in as a player.

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            • #7
              Okay, looks like I've found the answer, in a Hardball Times article by Don Malcolm dated 01/07/2009: Hall of Fame, Hall of Mirrors. Players not enshrined despite at least once receiving 45% or more of the BBWAA vote are Hodges (max 63%), Oliva (max 47%), and Lee Smith (max 45%).
              Last edited by westsidegrounds; 11-10-2012, 08:10 AM.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by westsidegrounds View Post
                Okay, looks like I've found the answer, in a Hardball Times article by Don Malcolm dated 01/07/2009: Hall of Fame, Hall of Mirrors. Players not enshrined despite at least once receiving 45% or more of the BBWAA vote are Hodges (max 63%), Oliva (max 47%), and Lee Smith (max 45%).
                Since '09, Raines (49), Bagwell (56) and Morris (67) (Smith (51)). I suppose some of these will make it eventually, but Smith might be one of them.
                Indeed the first step toward finding out is to acknowledge you do not satisfactorily know already; so that no blight can so surely arrest all intellectual growth as the blight of cocksureness.--CS Peirce

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Jackaroo Dave View Post
                  Since '09, Raines (49), Bagwell (56) and Morris (67) (Smith (51)). I suppose some of these will make it eventually, but Smith might be one of them.
                  Right.

                  Basically, every player - except Tony Oliva - who has received 45% or more of the Writers' vote is either (1) in already or (2) still under active consideration. (Hodges is due to be considered again by the Golden Era VC in 2014.)
                  Last edited by westsidegrounds; 11-12-2012, 02:31 PM.

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                  • #10
                    Does this means that Oliva deserves to be in the HOF? He was equal to Clemente in hitting stats, although with a shorter career. And he didn't have the defense to boot. I think his case is more of a feel good story about the 60's Twins.
                    "I am not too serious about anything. I believe you have to enjoy yourself to get the most out of your ability."-
                    George Brett

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by yankillaz View Post
                      Does this means that Oliva deserves to be in the HOF? He was equal to Clemente in hitting stats, although with a shorter career. And he didn't have the defense to boot. I think his case is more of a feel good story about the 60's Twins.
                      His case is a feel terrible story. I was an old school fan at the time, and when Tony came along, I thought, "Here's a guy who not only does it right, but does it so well that others are going to start doing it the same way." I was young and naive, but when he tore up his knee it broke my heart.
                      Indeed the first step toward finding out is to acknowledge you do not satisfactorily know already; so that no blight can so surely arrest all intellectual growth as the blight of cocksureness.--CS Peirce

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                      • #12
                        Tony Oliva should be in the HOF and it's ridiculous that he isn't. He had a devastating knee injury in 1972, and played 4 more seasons that soured his career stats. Before the injury, he was simply sensational.

                        From 1964-71 he was .313/.361/.507 OPS+ 141 8 straight all-star games , 2X MVP runnerup, 2 more top 6 finishes, ROY (should have been 64 MVP), GG, 3X batting leader, 5X hits leader, 4X doubles leader, 71 slugging leader, and 64 TB leader.

                        I grew up watching this guy on TV, he just ripped.
                        This week's Giant

                        #5 in games played as a Giant with 1721 , Bill Terry

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by JR Hart View Post
                          Tony Oliva should be in the HOF and it's ridiculous that he isn't. He had a devastating knee injury in 1972, and played 4 more seasons that soured his career stats. Before the injury, he was simply sensational.

                          From 1964-71 he was .313/.361/.507 OPS+ 141 8 straight all-star games , 2X MVP runnerup, 2 more top 6 finishes, ROY (should have been 64 MVP), GG, 3X batting leader, 5X hits leader, 4X doubles leader, 71 slugging leader, and 64 TB leader.

                          I grew up watching this guy on TV, he just ripped.
                          The Hall of Fame is not kind to corner outfielders with short careers, probably because there are so many already in with long careers. If Tony got in, he'd be comparable to Chick Hafey and Ross Youngs.

                          If he got in, well, it would be about time that he caught a break. He didn't get going until he was 25 and turned into Sean Casey at 32, and it seemed like all the way along he was met with frustrations and disappointment, which he bore stoically. (See his SABR biography.) But for those eight years he was something.
                          Indeed the first step toward finding out is to acknowledge you do not satisfactorily know already; so that no blight can so surely arrest all intellectual growth as the blight of cocksureness.--CS Peirce

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Jackaroo Dave View Post
                            The Hall of Fame is not kind to corner outfielders with short careers, probably because there are so many already in with long careers. If Tony got in, he'd be comparable to Chick Hafey and Ross Youngs.

                            If he got in, well, it would be about time that he caught a break. He didn't get going until he was 25 and turned into Sean Casey at 32, and it seemed like all the way along he was met with frustrations and disappointment, which he bore stoically. (See his SABR biography.) But for those eight years he was something.
                            Every case should be looked at individually. Oliva belongs
                            This week's Giant

                            #5 in games played as a Giant with 1721 , Bill Terry

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by JR Hart View Post
                              Every case should be looked at individually.
                              Unfortunately, many actual HOF voters share this mindset of ignoring precedent.
                              Si quaeris peninsulam amoenam, circumspice.

                              Comprehensive Reform for the Veterans Committee -- Fixing the Hall continued.

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