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Baseball Fever Policy

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Any suggestions on this policy may be made directly to the webmaster.

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This document was based on a similar policy used by SABR.

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Please adhere to these rules when you create your signature. Failure to do so will result in a request to comply by a moderator. If you do not comply within a reasonable amount of time, the signature will be removed and / or edited by an Administrator. Baseball Fever reserves the right to edit and / or remove any or all of your signature line at any time without contacting the account holder.

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Most concisely, the test for whether a post is appropriate for Baseball Fever is: "Does this message discuss our national pastime in an interesting manner?" This post can be direct or indirect: posing a question, asking for assistance, providing raw data or citations, or discussing and constructively critiquing existing posts. In general, a broad interpretation of "baseball related" is used.

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It is considered appropriate to post a URL to a page which specifically and directly answers a question posted on the list (for example, it would be permissible to post a link to a page containing home-road splits, even on a site which has advertising or other commercial content; however, it would not be appropriate to post the URL of the main page of the site). The site reserves the right to limit the frequency of such announcements by any individual or group.

In keeping with our test for a proper topic, posting to Baseball Fever should be treated as if you truly do care. This includes posting information that is, to the best of your knowledge, complete and accurate at the time you post. Any errors or ambiguities you catch later should be acknowledged and corrected in the thread, since Baseball Fever is sometimes considered to be a valuable reference for research information.

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When a post is submitted to Baseball Fever, it is forwarded by the server automatically and seen immediately. The moderator may:
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b. Immediately delete the thread as inappropriate for Baseball Fever. Examples include advertising, personal attacks, or spam. This is the case 1% of the time.

c. Move the thread. If a member makes a post about the Marlins in the Yankees forum it will be moved to the appropriate forum. This is the case 3% of the time.

d. Edit the message due to an inappropriate item. This is the case 1% of the time. There have been new users who will make a wonderful post, then add to their signature line (where your name / handle appears) a tagline that is a pure advertisement. This tagline will be removed, a note will be left in the message so he/she is aware of the edit, and personal contact will be made to the poster telling them what has been edited and what actions need to be taken to prevent further edits.

The moderators perform no checks on posts to verify factual or logical accuracy. While he/she may point out gross errors in factual data in replies to the thread, the moderator does not act as an "accuracy" editor. Also moderation is not a vehicle for censorship of individuals and/or opinions, and the moderator's decisions should not be taken personally.

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Sincerely,

Sean Holtz, Webmaster of Baseball Almanac & Baseball Fever
www.baseball-almanac.com | www.baseball-fever.com
"Baseball Almanac: Sharing Baseball. Sharing History."
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1944 Best of Baseball Election

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  • #16
    I have a hard time naming players as contributors based on what they did on the field of play. In terms of claim to fame for the contributor section is his snapping of the wrist to illegally throw fast pitches. I just don't see him being anything more than part of the evolutionary process of the game. What he did wasn't really unique and I am betting he wasn't really the first person to do it. Sure, he did it but what he did wasn't exactly like creating the microprocessor or figure out pasteurization was a good thing or organize an entire league.

    What he did was going to happen sooner or later. What he did may very well have changed the game but if he had taken a wrong turn to the game that day then we would probably be hyping John Shoehorn of 1860 instead for this contribution spot or Joe Greenfeld or Gary Bustleton or somebody. The point being name isn't really important for this evolutionary step.

    Comment


    • #17
      Players:

      1. Ross Barnes
      2. George Wright
      3. Ezra Sutton
      4. Joe Start
      5. Jimmy Collins
      6. Paul Hines
      7. Edd Roush
      8. Charlie Bennett
      9. Rabbit Maranville
      10. George Sisler
      11. Louis Santop
      12. Fred Clarke

      Contributors:

      1. Jim Creighton
      2. C. I. Taylor
      3. William Hulbert
      4. Bill Klem
      5. Francis Richter

      Not yet on my ballot, but high in my consideration set:

      Buzz Arlett
      Roger Bresnahan
      Pud Galvin
      George Gore
      Heinie Groh
      Bill Jackman
      Sherry Magee
      Bid McPhee
      Amos Rusie
      Dazzy Vance
      Zach Wheat
      Last edited by jjpm74; 03-29-2009, 09:15 AM.

      Comment


      • #18
        Originally posted by Ubiquitous View Post
        I have a hard time naming players as contributors based on what they did on the field of play. In terms of claim to fame for the contributor section is his snapping of the wrist to illegally throw fast pitches. I just don't see him being anything more than part of the evolutionary process of the game. What he did wasn't really unique and I am betting he wasn't really the first person to do it. Sure, he did it but what he did wasn't exactly like creating the microprocessor or figure out pasteurization was a good thing or organize an entire league.

        What he did was going to happen sooner or later. What he did may very well have changed the game but if he had taken a wrong turn to the game that day then we would probably be hyping John Shoehorn of 1860 instead for this contribution spot or Joe Greenfeld or Gary Bustleton or somebody. The point being name isn't really important for this evolutionary step.
        Are you sure it was going to happen otherwise? It hadn't become popular before him, that's for sure. Moreover, would the impact have been the same if the game had waited 10 or 20 years for someone else to popularize it? I agree that discoveries are sometimes serendipitous (see penicillin, for example), but history remembers those discoverers who ran with what they found. I see no reason for baseball to do differently.
        Seen on a bumper sticker: If only closed minds came with closed mouths.
        Some minds are like concrete--thoroughly mixed up and permanently set.
        A Lincoln: I don't think much of a man who is not wiser today than he was yesterday.

        Comment


        • #19
          Originally posted by jalbright View Post
          Are you sure it was going to happen otherwise? It hadn't become popular before him, that's for sure. Moreover, would the impact have been the same if the game had waited 10 or 20 years for someone else to popularize it? I agree that discoveries are sometimes serendipitous (see penicillin, for example), but history remembers those discoverers who ran with what they found. I see no reason for baseball to do differently.
          As the game of baseball becomes more competitive then the need to win becomes greater which means the seeking out of every advantage possible becomes greater. I'm not saying we should ignore Jim and his achievements, I just don't see any particular need to hoist him up to the top of my list.

          I don't know it as fact but I'm willing to bet that other people threw the ball illegally before Jim. It just so happens that Jim was at the right place at the right time for his actions to be widely disseminated throughout the baseball playing domain.

          To me crediting Jim is like crediting Roger Bannister with runner's ability to run faster than 4 minutes per mile. Sure he was the first but that doesn't but others quickly broke the 4 minute barrier as well.

          Comment


          • #20
            Originally posted by Ubiquitous View Post
            I am betting he wasn't really the first person to do it.
            I'm betting you'd be wrong.

            Comment


            • #21
              Considering how closely intertwined cricket and baseball were and how cricket made its own change from underhand to side arm to eventually over hand and along the way break the wrist I think it is entirely possible that people were doing what Jim did before Jim.

              For instance Tom Walker in the late 1700's is widely believed to be the first bowler to change from the underhand throwing style of cricket to the roundarm style. It would eventually become a mainstay of cricket until about 1864 when the overhand style became the popular choice.

              Comment


              • #22
                Players:

                1. Ross Barnes
                2. Charlie Bennett
                3. Jimmy Collins
                4. Ezra Sutton
                5. George Sisler
                6. Bob Caruthers
                7. George Wright
                8. Louis Santop
                9. Roger Bresnahan
                10. John Ward
                11. Dickey Pearce
                12. Charlie Radbourne
                Contributers:

                1. Jim Creighton
                2. Bill Klem
                3. Francis Richter
                4. O.P. Caylor
                5. Ed Barrow
                Last edited by bambambaseball; 03-28-2009, 04:45 PM.

                Comment


                • #23
                  Players

                  01. Sherry Magee
                  02. Pie Traynor
                  03. Heinie Groh
                  04. Zack Wheat
                  05. George Wright
                  06. Rabbit Marranville
                  07. Bid McPhee
                  08. Dazzy Vance
                  09. Max Carey
                  10. Roger Bresnahan
                  11. Amos Rusie
                  12. George Sisler

                  Contributors

                  01. Charles Comiskey
                  02. Ed Barrow
                  03. Jack Dunn
                  04. Jim Creighton
                  05. Bill Klem

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Players

                    1. Joe Jackson
                    2. Fred Clarke
                    3. Zack Wheat
                    4. Sherry Magee
                    5. Willie Keeler
                    6. Sam Thompson
                    7. Elmer Flick
                    8. Bill Terry
                    9. Harry Stovey
                    10. Pete Browning
                    11. George Sisler
                    12. Joe Kelley

                    Contributors

                    1. W. Hulbert
                    2. J. Creighton
                    3. A. Cartwright
                    4. K. Landis
                    5. F. Richter
                    My dream ballpark dimensions
                    LF: 388 Feet...Height 37 Feet...LCF: 455 Feet...CF: 542 Feet...Height 35 Feet
                    RCF: 471 Feet...RF: 400 Feet...Height 60 Feet
                    Location....San Diego

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Originally posted by Ubiquitous View Post
                      As the game of baseball becomes more competitive then the need to win becomes greater which means the seeking out of every advantage possible becomes greater. I'm not saying we should ignore Jim and his achievements, I just don't see any particular need to hoist him up to the top of my list.

                      I don't know it as fact but I'm willing to bet that other people threw the ball illegally before Jim. It just so happens that Jim was at the right place at the right time for his actions to be widely disseminated throughout the baseball playing domain.

                      To me crediting Jim is like crediting Roger Bannister with runner's ability to run faster than 4 minutes per mile. Sure he was the first but that doesn't but others quickly broke the 4 minute barrier as well.

                      The last paragraph, to me at least, is an argument against having a contributor ballot. That's fine, but if we're going to have one (and we will so long as there's sufficient interest and the rules call for one), it's irrelevant. You boosted Al Spalding for his sporting goods business, promotions, and so forth. Somebody was going to realize they could make money selling such items, and it only stands to reason they'd want to promote the game to help themselves. Some GM was going to have a player who would openly cross the color line. Eventually, one of them would have had success. These guys actually did these things, and popularized them and/or made them succeed. That's why we are supporting them as contributors.

                      The fact that Creighton is the guy who at the very least popularized pitching the new way renders the whole issue of whether or not he was actually the first to do so an interesting side question, but not one which should be determinative of him as a contributor. Certainly, Branch Rickey wasn't the first guy to try and put an African-American in a major league uniform. There's no question John McGraw tried it, but as a subterfuge, rather than as an open choice. Some may well have knowingly succeeded McGraw's way. Rickey, though, chose wisely as to who would be the first to make that open break with tradition, and gave Jackie ample support in the effort.
                      Seen on a bumper sticker: If only closed minds came with closed mouths.
                      Some minds are like concrete--thoroughly mixed up and permanently set.
                      A Lincoln: I don't think much of a man who is not wiser today than he was yesterday.

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Players
                        1 Joe Jackson
                        2 Addie Joss
                        3 George Sisler
                        4 Ross Barnes
                        5 Dazzy Vance
                        6 Bid McPhee
                        7 Wille Keeler
                        8 John Ward
                        9 Elmer Flick
                        10 Rube Waddell
                        11 Bill Terry
                        12 Pie Traynor

                        Contributors
                        1 Bill Klem
                        2 Charles Comiskey
                        3 Abner Doubleday
                        4 A Cartwright
                        5 W Hulbert

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          1. Louis Santop
                          2. George Wright
                          3. John M. Ward
                          4. Jimmy Collins
                          5. Ross Barnes
                          6. Amos Rusie
                          7. George Sisler
                          8. Sam Thompson
                          9. Old Hoss Radbourn
                          10. Paul Hines
                          11. Zack Wheat
                          12. Frank Grant

                          Contributors:

                          1. William Hulbert
                          2. Francis Richter
                          3. Jim Creighton
                          4. C. I. Taylor
                          5. Bill Klem

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            bambam,
                            We elected Frisch.

                            --
                            Regarding Creighton and Pasteur:

                            I consider it likely that fast pitching would have arrived in the New York game a few seasons after Creighton introduced it, probably before the war, although that might have delayed it until several years later. Creighton was a leading young cricketer himself, but I don't know that that connection or the health of the other game helps predict how quickly someone else would have snapped the wrist. If round-arm bowling ruled in America, which doesn't follow from its popularity in first class cricket, that may have delayed rather than hastened transfer to the New York game.

                            At the same time I consider it likely that pasteurization and other health practices based on the germ theory of disease would have arrived in the rich countries a few years later without Pasteur. Others were engaged in the historical processes of developing microscopes and discovering germs. Maybe Pasteur and his movement even caused others to retrench and they might have taken the same path themselves if wandering on their own.

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              1. Jimmy Collins
                              2. John M. Ward
                              3. Max Carey
                              4. Louis Santop
                              5. Dazzy Vance
                              6. Fred Clarke
                              7. Paul Hines
                              8. Sherry Magee
                              9. Amos Rusie
                              10. George Sisler
                              11. Zack Wheat
                              12. Ezra Sutton

                              Contributors:

                              1. Alexander Cartwright
                              2. William Hulbert
                              3. Francis Richter
                              4. Jim Creighton
                              5. Bill Klem
                              "Any pitcher who throws at a batter and deliberately tries to hit him is a communist."

                              - Alvin Dark

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Under the rules, we already have a quorum for the contributor ballot, and when leecemark provides at least two more names (or somebody else casts a valid ballot), we'll have a quorum for the player ballot as well.
                                Seen on a bumper sticker: If only closed minds came with closed mouths.
                                Some minds are like concrete--thoroughly mixed up and permanently set.
                                A Lincoln: I don't think much of a man who is not wiser today than he was yesterday.

                                Comment

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