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Best slugger of the 1930's?

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  • Best slugger of the 1930's?

    Was it Lou, Jimmie, Hank, Babe maybe Joe or Ted?

    An Era known for prolific offense but who came out on top?
    83
    The Iron Horse
    49.40%
    41
    Double X
    44.58%
    37
    Hank
    2.41%
    2
    The Bambino
    2.41%
    2
    The Yankee Clipper
    0%
    0
    The Splendid Splinter
    1.20%
    1
    Others
    0%
    0
    "I was pitching one day when my glasses clouded up on me. I took them off to polish them. When I looked up to the plate, I saw Jimmie Foxx. The sight of him terrified me so much that I haven't been able to wear glasses since." - Left Gomez

    "(Lou) Gehrig never learned that a ballplayer couldn't be good every day." - Hank Gowdy

  • #2
    has to be Gehrig since he actually played almost all of the decade

    Comment


    • #3
      Well, in the 30s, Babe was past his prime, and Williams and DiMaggio weren't yet in their prime, so they're eliminated. It is basically Gehrig vs. Foxx. Overall, I'd go with Gehrig, but since this poll is only about slugging ing the 30s, I go with Foxx, mostly because he hit more home runs and was actually slightly better than Gehrig as a slugger in the 1930s.

      Comment


      • #4
        Jimmie Foxx, 1932:
        .364/.469/.749, 58 HR, 169 RBI, 151 R, 213 H, 116 BB, 438 TB

        That's all I need to see.
        "Hall of Famer Whitey Ford now on the field... pleading with the crowd for, for some kind of sanity!"

        Comment


        • #5
          Lou Gehrig, 1934:
          .363/.465/.706, 49 HR, 165 RBI, 128 R, 210 H, 109 BB, 409 TB

          That's all I need to see.
          Yankees '09

          Arod, CC, AJ, DJ and Tex

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Yankee Legend
            Lou Gehrig, 1934:
            .363/.465/.706, 49 HR, 165 RBI, 128 R, 210 H, 109 BB, 409 TB

            That's all I need to see.
            I'll take Foxx's 1932 over Gehrig's 1934 any day.

            Comment


            • #7
              No Chuck Klein?
              "Simply put, the passion, interest and tradition surrounding baseball in New York is unmatched."

              Sean McAdam, ESPN.com

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by ElHalo
                No Chuck Klein?
                I think Klein's numbers were inflated by playing most of his games in that bandbox known as the Baker Bowl. I don't know the exact dimensions of that park, but you could knock one out in right field practically on a checked swing.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by 538280
                  I'll take Foxx's 1932 over Gehrig's 1934 any day.
                  and I'll take Gehrig's 1930 and Babe's 1931 over Foxx's 32 any day

                  Lou 1930: .379/.473/.721, 41 HR, 174 RBI, 143 R, 220 Hits, 101 BB, 419 TB, 203 OPS+ along with 17 triples
                  Babe 1931: .373/.495/.700 46 HR, 163 RBI, 149 R, 199 Hits, 128 BB, 374 TB, 219 OPS+
                  Last edited by Blackout; 08-01-2005, 08:05 PM.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Have to go with Gehrig.

                    Not sure how Ted got on this list, he debuted in 1939. And DiMaggio didn't turn up to 1936. And the Babe's last good season was 1932, maybe 1933...

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      If we're talking greater player, I would go with Gehrig easily. But for pure power, Foxx has to take this, especially because the time period mostly eliminates Ruth from serious consideration.

                      I think the great sluggers have something in them that other players don't. A select number of players can post 40 homer seasons, but when you're getting up to 60, only the great sluggers are capable of that kind of power.

                      Two present day examples of what I mean would be comparing Manny to Mark McGwire. I'd take Manny over Mark any day, but for pure power, Manny can't hang, and I doubt even steroids could get him hitting seventy home runs in one year.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I tokk slugger as overall, not just Hr and LG % so I went with Gehrig. Her and Foxx are the only two who played more than half the decade with great numbers. Klein's home/road splits show the effect of the Baker Bowl. Joe had 1936-1939, only 4 years pretty much the same with Trotsky and Greenburg.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by four tool
                          Her and Foxx.
                          You know something the rest of us don't?

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            --Too bad Foxx and Miss Gehrig never got together. They could have produced the greatest slugger ever hands down (although perhaps there was more to the Babe's nickame than we thought too ).

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by four tool
                              Joe had 1936-1939, only 4 years pretty much the same with Trotsky and Greenburg.
                              That may be true about Trotsky, but I read that Lenin had a pretty good career with the Bolsheviks in Russia's Socialist League.

                              Comment

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