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worst owner ever

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  • Bluesteve32
    replied
    As far as the worse owner, I'd say that the Seattle Pilots ownership was quite poor. I don't remember who this guy was, but that whole situation, then he bail out and sells to the Bug Selig group.

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  • Bluesteve32
    replied
    Originally posted by bkmckenna
    I love the Oscar Gamble Afro user name it reminds me of collecting baseball cards when I was a kid
    YoU mean this one:
    Attached Files

    Leave a comment:


  • Steve Jeltz
    replied
    Originally posted by abacab
    Amos Rusie could have been one of the greatest pitchers ever, but he chose to retire at age 27 instead of continuing to play for Andrew Freedman. Now that is a bad owner.
    Rusie didn't retire. He sat out the 1896 season for a $5000 dollar contract and a return of a $200 fine that Freedman unjustly levied against Rusie. Rusie filed a civil suit for the $200 and, after the season, realizing the fiasco that Freedman created, other NL owners decided to pool their own money to meet Rusie's $5000 dollar contract demand and his return of the $200 fine from Freedman. Rusie returned in 1897 posting a 28-10 record and leading the NL in ERA.

    The owners of the Cleveland Spiders were Frank and Stanley Robison, also the owners of the NL St. Louis Browns at the same time. The Robison's traded all of the best Cleveland players, Cy Young, Bobby Wallace, Jesse Burkett, Patsy Tebeau, to St. Louis, while the Spiders received St. Louis' discards. Thus, that was the reason for the 20-134 record in 1899.

    The worst owner in my book is former Phillies owner William F. Baker. Baker singlehandedly created the Phillies losing aura. Whether it was the selling or bad trades of future Hall of Famers (Grover Alexander, Dave Bancroft, Eppa Rixey), or letting his stadium deteriorate to the point where it was literally life threatening for fans to come into,or leaving the team in such sorry financial shape, Baker left a mark on the Phillies that is still somewhat felt today.

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  • theAmazingMet
    replied
    Walter O'Malley and Horace Stoneham. For stealing the heart of New York City for greed and money. They both represent the end of the "golden age" of innocence in sports and the beginnings of big business "who gives a damn about the fans" attitude.

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  • MasonDixon
    replied
    I'd think it would be whoever owned the 1899 Cleveland Spiders.

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  • iPod
    replied
    Tom Yawkey.

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  • letsgocubbies
    replied
    Well, I'd say Comiskey.
    Last edited by Bill Burgess; 02-01-2006, 07:35 AM.

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  • Sultan_1895-1948
    replied
    What Bill, no Frank Navin on your list?

    I gotta go with the Devil Rays owner, whoever that boob is.

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  • Dodger
    replied
    Originally posted by abacab
    Amos Rusie could have been one of the greatest pitchers ever, but he chose to retire at age 27 instead of continuing to play for Andrew Freedman. Now that is a bad owner.
    I agree that Freedman is the worst.

    He came very close to orchestrating a situation where the entire NL would have been syndicate owned, which could have killed the game.

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  • Bill Burgess
    replied
    Comiskey
    Frazee
    George Leon Argyros, Sr. - Mariners
    J. Earl Wagner

    But the topper for the arch-villain -- I was born in Brooklyn. Can you guess?
    Last edited by Bill Burgess; 11-19-2008, 06:34 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Brian McKenna
    replied
    John Davidson owned the LOU Colonels in the American Association. In 1889 his woeful team was 27-111 and he was losing money fast - so he started fining his players to cover his losses. Some men were fined more than they made. Eventually, it led to six players striking. The fines were eventually "repaid" but Davidson wrote those checks on a closed account. He was forced out at the end of the year.

    Leave a comment:


  • abacab
    replied
    Amos Rusie could have been one of the greatest pitchers ever, but he chose to retire at age 27 instead of continuing to play for Andrew Freedman. Now that is a bad owner.

    Leave a comment:


  • oscargamblesfro
    replied
    soden was indeed cheap, and his cheapness was, in part, responsible for some of the remnants of the braves' 1890's dynasty fleeing to the red sox- guys like collins,dinneen,freeman etc..while the team was over the hill by that point, soden certainly was a contributing factor in plunging the most successful club of the 1800's into perennial cellar dwellers.

    by the way, i have no idea who the john davidson you mention was, but he can't have sucked worse than the john davidson who croons and hosted "that's incredible!"

    Leave a comment:


  • Brian McKenna
    replied
    von der Ahe definitely

    also might want to note:
    Arthur Soden
    John Davidson
    and a host of others that sparked the formation of the Players League

    By the way, players who became owners were never benevolent: Spalding, Comiskey, Griffith, Monte Ward and others had little regard for the help. It is how business was conducted until the labor movement.

    The players never had an effective voice until Marvin Miller. Landis always liked to tout himself as a players' commish but that is just because they were scared of him and brought few problems his way.

    Leave a comment:


  • hellborn
    replied
    How about Chris von der Ahe of the St. Louis Browns?
    Wasn't he totally ignorant, encouraging of umpire abuse, disdainful of his players, and involved in shady collusion behind the scenes?

    Leave a comment:

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