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worst owner ever

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  • #16
    soden was indeed cheap, and his cheapness was, in part, responsible for some of the remnants of the braves' 1890's dynasty fleeing to the red sox- guys like collins,dinneen,freeman etc..while the team was over the hill by that point, soden certainly was a contributing factor in plunging the most successful club of the 1800's into perennial cellar dwellers.

    by the way, i have no idea who the john davidson you mention was, but he can't have sucked worse than the john davidson who croons and hosted "that's incredible!"

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    • #17
      Amos Rusie could have been one of the greatest pitchers ever, but he chose to retire at age 27 instead of continuing to play for Andrew Freedman. Now that is a bad owner.

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      • #18
        John Davidson owned the LOU Colonels in the American Association. In 1889 his woeful team was 27-111 and he was losing money fast - so he started fining his players to cover his losses. Some men were fined more than they made. Eventually, it led to six players striking. The fines were eventually "repaid" but Davidson wrote those checks on a closed account. He was forced out at the end of the year.

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        • #19
          Comiskey
          Frazee
          George Leon Argyros, Sr. - Mariners
          J. Earl Wagner

          But the topper for the arch-villain -- I was born in Brooklyn. Can you guess?
          Last edited by Bill Burgess; 11-19-2008, 05:34 PM.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by abacab
            Amos Rusie could have been one of the greatest pitchers ever, but he chose to retire at age 27 instead of continuing to play for Andrew Freedman. Now that is a bad owner.
            I agree that Freedman is the worst.

            He came very close to orchestrating a situation where the entire NL would have been syndicate owned, which could have killed the game.

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            • #21
              What Bill, no Frank Navin on your list?

              I gotta go with the Devil Rays owner, whoever that boob is.

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              • #22
                Well, I'd say Comiskey.
                Last edited by Bill Burgess; 02-01-2006, 06:35 AM.

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                • #23
                  Tom Yawkey.
                  "Hall of Famer Whitey Ford now on the field... pleading with the crowd for, for some kind of sanity!"

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                  • #24
                    I'd think it would be whoever owned the 1899 Cleveland Spiders.

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                    • #25
                      Walter O'Malley and Horace Stoneham. For stealing the heart of New York City for greed and money. They both represent the end of the "golden age" of innocence in sports and the beginnings of big business "who gives a damn about the fans" attitude.
                      unknown brooklyn cabbie " how are the brooks doin"
                      unknown fan "good they got three men on base"
                      unknown brooklyn cabbie "which one?"

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by abacab
                        Amos Rusie could have been one of the greatest pitchers ever, but he chose to retire at age 27 instead of continuing to play for Andrew Freedman. Now that is a bad owner.
                        Rusie didn't retire. He sat out the 1896 season for a $5000 dollar contract and a return of a $200 fine that Freedman unjustly levied against Rusie. Rusie filed a civil suit for the $200 and, after the season, realizing the fiasco that Freedman created, other NL owners decided to pool their own money to meet Rusie's $5000 dollar contract demand and his return of the $200 fine from Freedman. Rusie returned in 1897 posting a 28-10 record and leading the NL in ERA.

                        The owners of the Cleveland Spiders were Frank and Stanley Robison, also the owners of the NL St. Louis Browns at the same time. The Robison's traded all of the best Cleveland players, Cy Young, Bobby Wallace, Jesse Burkett, Patsy Tebeau, to St. Louis, while the Spiders received St. Louis' discards. Thus, that was the reason for the 20-134 record in 1899.

                        The worst owner in my book is former Phillies owner William F. Baker. Baker singlehandedly created the Phillies losing aura. Whether it was the selling or bad trades of future Hall of Famers (Grover Alexander, Dave Bancroft, Eppa Rixey), or letting his stadium deteriorate to the point where it was literally life threatening for fans to come into,or leaving the team in such sorry financial shape, Baker left a mark on the Phillies that is still somewhat felt today.

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by bkmckenna
                          I love the Oscar Gamble Afro user name it reminds me of collecting baseball cards when I was a kid
                          YoU mean this one:
                          Attached Files
                          http://www.baseballhalloffame.org/ex...eline_1961.jpg

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                          • #28
                            As far as the worse owner, I'd say that the Seattle Pilots ownership was quite poor. I don't remember who this guy was, but that whole situation, then he bail out and sells to the Bug Selig group.
                            http://www.baseballhalloffame.org/ex...eline_1961.jpg

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by Bluesteve32
                              As far as the worse owner, I'd say that the Seattle Pilots ownership was quite poor. I don't remember who this guy was, but that whole situation, then he bail out and sells to the Bug Selig group.
                              The local owners were Dewey and Max Soriano of Seattle, with some monetary backing from William Daley (former Cleveland Indians owner). This ownership group was woefully underfunded and I think that part of the blame for the failure of the Seattle Pilots deserves to be placed on MLB for awarding a franchise to owners that couldn't meet the financial demands that operating a major league franchise requires.

                              A couple of my nominees:

                              Bob Short, who traded away the nucleus of a decent Washington Senators team for a washed up, baggage-laden Denny McClain, only to see attendance drop when the team unravelled, and then abscond to Texas with the team in tow. (I might point out, for those who are unaware, that this is the same Bob Short who moved the NBA's Minneapolis Lakers to LA and then sold the Lakers, for an obscene profit, to Jack Kent Cooke.) MLB gets part of the blame for this one too-Short had already shown that he was a carpet bagger-and was looking for some Texas oil money to line his greedy little pockets. :grouchy

                              Peter Angelos, who has turned a once pround franchise into a haven of mediocrity. h With one of the best stadiums in MLB, the seats go empty due to the poor product on the field. His frequent tantrums are legend in the Maryland legislature. He reminds me of a spoiled rich kid who goes into histronics whenever he doesn't get his way (which isn't very often). Time to sell to out, Pete, to someone who's interested in restoring respectability to the Orioles.
                              "For the Washington Senators, the worst time of the year is the baseball season." Roger Kahn

                              "People ask me what I do in winter when there's no baseball. I'll tell you what I do. I stare out the window and wait for spring." Rogers Hornsby.

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by Joltin' Joe
                                I based my opinion on Comiskey on all the books I have read. But you're probably right about 19th century owners. Afterall they came up with the reserve clause and presented it as if it was some sort of a prestige award.
                                Don't kid yourself; the owners knew exactly what they were presenting in the form of the reserve clause, and it had nothing to do with honoring the players and everything to do with putting a leash on themselves the owners.

                                How about all 15 owners who initially voted against the Brooklyn Dodgers and the integration of baseball?

                                No votes from me for either Finley or Schott. They may not have been the best of people, but they also were not the worst of owners. Schott never gets enough credit for the fact she stuck up for her fans by demanding that the Reds always be the most affordable ticket in the majors, including concessions, while she was owner.
                                Never confuse character with geography --- Red Smith
                                Astros Daily

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