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worst owner ever

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    Ubiquitous
    stats moderator

  • Ubiquitous
    replied
    Yes Eddie Cicotte accepted $10,000 because Comiskey wouldn't pick up a $10 laundry tab.

    The Chicago White Sox were the highest paid team in the game back then.

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  • All-StarLF1713
    Registered User

  • All-StarLF1713
    replied
    Originally posted by Brian McKenna View Post
    I don't see what Comiskey did to make himself stand out. People always want to blame the man for their problems. It is a cop out to blame Comiskey in any way shape or form for the tainted World Series. He conducted business very similar to those before and after him. You want to highlight someone, dig out the 19th century books and pick those that emulated the robber barons and their complete disregard for labor.
    comiskey was overly stingy. the 1919 scandal was mostly (i think) a revolt against comiskey bc he wouldnt even pay to wash ther uniforms. oh and about damage to the game,, bud selig

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  • Paul Wendt
    Registered User

  • Paul Wendt
    replied
    Originally posted by Brad Harris View Post
    From a Cincinnati-centric POV, I nominate John T. Brush for doing just about everything he could to kill baseball in this city, from loaning players to his Indianapolis Western League club, to pulling strings to get Ban Johnson away from the Commercial Gazette and onto greener pastures ...
    Have you read any of Ban Johnson's baseball coverage? If so, what parts of the job did he do well? Did Johnson ever say anything to reveal whether he might have been content with a career as baseball editor? It seems to misfit BanJ as we know him.

    In those days many writers got involved in baseball club or league management including major league owners Horace Fogel (phillies) and Charles Murphy (cubs). By the way wikipedia places Murphy at the Cincinnati Enquirer and Times-Star. He "joined the New York Giants front office in 1905" --maybe a Brush connection?

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  • Ubiquitous
    stats moderator

  • Ubiquitous
    replied
    Being an owner isn't really a "job". You can't really be fired from being an owner. You are the guy that fires other people. About the closest you can get to being fired is what happened to William Cox and the Phillies. He owned the Phillies for less than a year because it turned out he was betting on baseball games. Cox certainly wasn't the worst owner the leagues ever saw.

    Basically an onwer, besides Cox, ownly lasts a few years because they run out of money or die.

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  • Bothrops Atrox
    IDC/ZRC/NJC*/*

  • Bothrops Atrox
    replied
    Originally posted by Brad Harris View Post
    Sure there are, but those guys wouldn't qualify for the "worst owner" in baseball history title, would they? As a friend much wiser and older than me used to say, "you have to be good to be that bad." The truly inglorious men who rose to the occasion had to stay in the game long enough to make a lasting impression.
    I disagree - if you are so bad that you can't even do your your job well enough to last more than a year or two, you are "worse" at it than somebody who is good, but makes a habdful of big mistakes over a long career.

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  • Lucas718
    Registered User

  • Lucas718
    replied
    Originally posted by Paul Wendt View Post
    but all this was "done and gone" under Edward Bennett Williams (1980-88).

    In 1985 or 1986 Eddie Murray complained that the Orioles had abandoned the Way, based on his observations of spring training and of young players who rose to the parent team from its system. His friend in management, now a Red Sox VP (name?), essentially learned from Murray that they might all need to leave soon. He says that some in the Red Sox team consider themselves the vessel of the Oriole Way. --people who moved from Baltimore to San Diego, or San Diego to Boston, and Baltimore to Boston if they reached back for a few more.

    (Current Red Sox president Larry Lucchino came to the Orioles and rose to the presidency with Williams. Much of the management team, and the Oriole Way of course, they inherited from the Hoffberger Brewery.)
    Yep, a lot of people like to blame Angelos for this but the Oriole Way was abandoned years before he took over. It's no coincidence that they have only had 8 above .500 seasons and only 2 playoff appearances since they last won the World Series in '83. In fact they have only won 90 games once in that time frame.

    Angelos wasn't responsible for the demise of the Oriole Way, but he hasn't done much to restore it either. He gets all the blame for the past 11 dismal seasons.
    Lucas718
    Registered User
    Last edited by Lucas718; 03-09-2009, 10:18 AM.

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  • Chadwick
    Rolen on to Cooperstown

  • Chadwick
    replied
    Originally posted by STLCards2 View Post
    Surely there is some no-named forgotten guy who was around for only a couple of years only and had horrible teams and lost money. Almost all of the guys mentioned so far are big-namers. It is hard to become recognizable as an owner if you don't reach some success (or at least own a high-profile club. Just a thought.
    Sure there are, but those guys wouldn't qualify for the "worst owner" in baseball history title, would they? As a friend much wiser and older than me used to say, "you have to be good to be that bad." The truly inglorious men who rose to the occasion had to stay in the game long enough to make a lasting impression.

    Leave a comment:

  • Paul Wendt
    Registered User

  • Paul Wendt
    replied
    Originally posted by Victory Faust View Post
    The Orioles always had such a great tradition -- "The Oriole Way" permeated every nook and cranny of the franchise, from the lowest minor league team to the big club. I would love to see the team turn it around, because it would be good for baseball to once again have a strong team in such a great baseball town as Baltimore.
    but all this was "done and gone" under Edward Bennett Williams (1980-88).

    In 1985 or 1986 Eddie Murray complained that the Orioles had abandoned the Way, based on his observations of spring training and of young players who rose to the parent team from its system. His friend in management, now a Red Sox VP (name?), essentially learned from Murray that they might all need to leave soon. He says that some in the Red Sox team consider themselves the vessel of the Oriole Way. --people who moved from Baltimore to San Diego, or San Diego to Boston, and Baltimore to Boston if they reached back for a few more.

    (Current Red Sox president Larry Lucchino came to the Orioles and rose to the presidency with Williams. Much of the management team, and the Oriole Way of course, they inherited from the Hoffberger Brewery.)

    Leave a comment:

  • Bothrops Atrox
    IDC/ZRC/NJC*/*

  • Bothrops Atrox
    replied
    Originally posted by Brad Harris View Post
    I won't argue about Steinbrenner, though I disagree strenuously that he's been bad for the Yankees or MLB, but how on earth was Marge Schott bad for the game in any kind of historical sense?
    Surely there is some no-named forgotten guy who was around for only a couple of years only and had horrible teams and lost money. Almost all of the guys mentioned so far are big-namers. It is hard to become recognizable as an owner if you don't reach some success (or at least own a high-profile club. Just a thought.

    Leave a comment:

  • Chadwick
    Rolen on to Cooperstown

  • Chadwick
    replied
    Originally posted by oscargamblesfro View Post
    what team owner is the worst ever? by worst, i mean which owner has done the most damage to the game in general, and/or his or her team. not someone stuck with a bad club for years. it doesn't matter whether the team was successful or not. some of the possible choices, feel free to add others:

    andrew freedman
    george steinbrenner
    harry frazee
    charles o. finley
    marge schott
    I won't argue about Steinbrenner, though I disagree strenuously that he's been bad for the Yankees or MLB, but how on earth was Marge Schott bad for the game in any kind of historical sense?

    Leave a comment:

  • Tampa Bay Giants
    Reds,Rays,Marlins&Braves

  • Tampa Bay Giants
    replied
    Originally posted by Brian McKenna View Post
    I love the Oscar Gamble Afro user name it reminds me of collecting baseball cards when I was a kid

    Leave a comment:

  • Dalkowski110
    White Lightning!

  • Dalkowski110
    replied
    I would say Andrew Freedman. Yes, I know he did some good, but the bad things he did were REALLY bad. As someone said earlier, he seemed just this side of psychotic.

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  • Born in 57
    Registered User

  • Born in 57
    replied
    CBS and their brief tenure as owners of the Yankee's (pre Steinbrenner) ranks among the darkest hours of the franchise and an even worse investment of CBS's money.

    They oversaw the collapse of the on-field dynasty with complete apathy, and watched the stadium itself crumble to a soon-to-be-condemned structure. All while losing millions in the process.

    Leave a comment:

  • Victory Faust
    He of the windmill windup

  • Victory Faust
    replied
    Originally posted by Lucas718 View Post
    Peter Angelos.

    He had a ballpark that was sold out every night. He had a competitive team. He had the support of the fans. Then he systematically destroyed it all. Attendance is down 50% from 1997.

    Before he took over, the Orioles had never had more than 3 consecutive losing seasons in their history. 2009 will be the 12th consecutive losing season under his ownership.

    He over-ruled the people he hired to make baseball decisions.
    He refuses to spend money on quality free agents. They tend to make offers just good enough to miss out on an actual signing.

    I could go on and on and on.


    I feel your pain. Mike Ilitch did the exact same thing to the Tigers before Dave Dombrowski came onboard. In fact, the Tigers during the first decade of Ilitch's reign saw one of the worst 10-year periods in the history of baseball.

    The Orioles always had such a great tradition -- "The Oriole Way" permeated every nook and cranny of the franchise, from the lowest minor league team to the big club. I would love to see the team turn it around, because it would be good for baseball to once again have a strong team in such a great baseball town as Baltimore.
    Victory Faust
    He of the windmill windup
    Last edited by Victory Faust; 03-06-2009, 03:36 PM.

    Leave a comment:

  • Chadwick
    Rolen on to Cooperstown

  • Chadwick
    replied
    From a Cincinnati-centric POV, I nominate John T. Brush for doing just about everything he could to kill baseball in this city, from loaning players to his Indianapolis Western League club, to pulling strings to get Ban Johnson away from the Commercial Gazette and onto greener pastures and for sending virtually any promising talent (from Christy Mathewson on down) to the Giants in anticipation of his eventual abandonment of the club. Had the guy paid as much attention to the one major league club he held a majority stake in during the 1890s rather than stargaze at the Big Apple for most of the decade, the Reds would likely have started the 20th Century with a very competitive team.

    Not that Brush didn't make his team's success his number one priority in NY at least, but the man tried to kill the American League, cancelled the 1904 World Series and was essentially responsible for orchestrating the death of major league baseball in Baltimore for the first half of the century also.

    Brush was Freedman's major ally in the league (eventually buying the Giants from him after stocking it with the Reds' best players) and led the move towards holding all NL clubs in a mutual trust (the ultimate syndicated plot.) Prior to that Brush's salary cap plan for professional baseball was adopted by the leagues in 1889, a leading cause of J.M. Ward's Players League revolt.

    A highly successful owner in a business sense, Brush got everything he wanted in terms of the success of his own ballclub. That club just happened to be the New York Giants. The man had a great deal of responsibility for nearly ruining the two league system - not just once, but - twice! He sold out the fans of Cincinnati in favor of not just another NL team, but of his previous interest (in a minor league) before then. Odious behavior from the standpoint of this Reds fan. To me, Brush seems like a combination of the worst features of Jeffrey Loria, Andrew Freedman and Arnold Johnson.

    Leave a comment:

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