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  • Destroyed Career

    I wanna know who hadn an excellent career only to be destroyed on a play such as Bill Buckner or Tony Graffanino.
    "I don't like to sound egotistical, but every time I stepped up to the plate with a bat in my hands, I couldn't help but feel sorry for the pitcher."
    -Rogers Hornsby-

    "People ask me what I do in winter when there's no baseball. I'll tell you what I do. I stare out the window and wait for spring."
    -Rogers Hornsby-

    Just a note to all the active members of BBF, I consider all of you the smartest baseball people I have ever communicated with and love everyday I am on here. Thank you all!

  • #2
    How about Bill Buckner? Donnie Moore anyone?
    I'm a Ramblin' Wreck from Georgia Tech and a Hell of an Engineer!

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    • #3
      I'd submit Fred Snodgrass, Mickey Owen, and to a lesser extent Freddie Lindstrom. Although, none of them are on par with Buckner.

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      • #4
        How exactly did Bill Buckner "destroy" his career? He was a very accomplished player, one of the best contact hitters of his era. I don't know his final numbers, but he fell just under 3,000 hits, was a career .300 hitter and won a batting title one year. Remember, he batted third on a Red Sox club loaded with great hitters. One flub in a World Series game hardly negates all that!

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        • #5
          since when the hell did Graffanino have a good career?

          that 87 OPS+ and little league fielding doesnt pass for excellent
          Last edited by Blackout; 10-07-2005, 02:50 PM.

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          • #6
            Gene Mauch - September 1964
            8 guys in October 1919
            Norm Cash - corking
            Many with steroid stink attached

            I don't think you can destroy your career making a fielding error - that's just bar talk.

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            • #7
              Well,among Giant fans, the conventional wisdom is that Atlee Hammaker, always a too sensitive soul, was never the same after he gave up a grand slam to, I believe, Fred Lynn, in the All-Star game -- his first time on the national stage. Also, when rookie pitcher Salomon Torres was thrown out to pitch a one game tie-breaker playoff and got hammered, he was never the same, but that's a whole game, not a play.

              I'm assuming we're not talking about injuries -- that's too easy. Or there's Reds catcher Willard Hershberger, who blamed his bad pitchcalling for the two home runs that led to a Reds' loss, and he committed suicide.
              sigpicIt's not whether you fall -- everyone does -- but how you come out of the fall that counts.

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              • #8
                Fred Merkle, too.
                "Hall of Famer Whitey Ford now on the field... pleading with the crowd for, for some kind of sanity!"

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Cubsfan97
                  I wanna know who hadn an excellent career only to be destroyed on a play such as Bill Buckner or Tony Graffanino.
                  Rafael Palmeiro, the play was on the steroid issue.
                  Frank's Field of Dreams
                  "If I build it, you'll come."

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                  • #10
                    Mitch Williams was never the same after giving up the World Series ending homer to Joe Carter in 1993. Williams was out of baseball by 1997.

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                    • #11
                      Hershberger was probably the most serious. There's tons of injuries, like Earle Combs almost killing himself crashing into the CF wall at Yankee Stadium, Dizzy Dean in the All Star game, etc., etc.
                      "Simply put, the passion, interest and tradition surrounding baseball in New York is unmatched."

                      Sean McAdam, ESPN.com

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Gooch
                        How exactly did Bill Buckner "destroy" his career? He was a very accomplished player, one of the best contact hitters of his era. I don't know his final numbers, but he fell just under 3,000 hits, was a career .300 hitter and won a batting title one year. Remember, he batted third on a Red Sox club loaded with great hitters. One flub in a World Series game hardly negates all that!
                        Only 453 strikeouts in 9000+ ABs. Incredible.

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                        • #13
                          I wouldn't say Ralph Branca had an "excellent career," but he certainly belongs on any list of players whose careers are defined by one unfortunate play. And whose performance after that event was never as good as it was before.

                          Branca was only 25 when he threw his fateful pitch, and had already won 76 games -- including a 21-win season at the age of 21.

                          After Thomson, he went 12-12 for the remainder of his career, and was out of baseball by age 30.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Steve Jeltz
                            Mitch Williams was never the same after giving up the World Series ending homer to Joe Carter in 1993. Williams was out of baseball by 1997.
                            Yeah but that's not saying a whole lot. He was never built to last.

                            What about players who recover from such moments and it doesn't seem to hurt their performance or their popuarity? Mariano Rivera blew the 2001 WS and 2 straight games in last years' ALCS and nobody holds a grudge over it. Every great closer has famous moments where they didn't get it done though.

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                            • #15
                              Grady Little may have had a good managerial career, if not for the Pedro fiasco in NY.
                              I'm a Ramblin' Wreck from Georgia Tech and a Hell of an Engineer!

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