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  • Originally posted by SHOELESSJOE3 View Post
    One thing for sure. at least my thinking. No matter who hit the longest, there are probably a dozen or more of the big name sluggers who hit at least one just as far or nearly as far.

    We will never know. I do lean more to some of the long ones hit years ago, that cleared a fence or wall. Simply because there were some monster parks with footage marked off. We don't see those long distances in todays parks. We have to assume that Hit Tracker got it right because many long ones land in the seats and Hit Tracker tells us where it would have landed on ground if not obstucted.
    If a home run in the old Yankee Stadium clears the wall at the 463 foot marker by 20 or 30 feet. Easy math had to be close to 470, maybe 480 or 490 feet. Same deal with the old Briggs Stadium in center, clear the wall at the 455 mark, you at the least it was 455 feet plus.

    How do we know for sure that a ball that lands in the seating area today if not obstructed by the seats, would have touched ground at the footage that Hit Tracker comes up with. We don't and they could never prove it, because the ball never touched ground.
    I study stadium layouts as a hobby ,of the old parks as well, so I do know how far the ball is from the plate vertically and horizontally, when it lands in the bleachers or upper deck. Calculations of home runs are credible, they use the same math to land rockets on the moon, but the home run calculation are not done as precise, so what you end up with is a legitimate estimate. I do my own calculation ,the math is never wrong the problem with the calculations, is the data gathered is sometime incorrect or internally manipulated to get a higher or low out come.
    Hit Trackers / Statcast use sensors to gather initial data on a home runs , the problem with that is once you take your initial reading if there are any changes in atmospheric conditions ,during the flight of to ball, it will alter your final distance. Lets say a batter hit one while it claim 2 second into the flight you get a 15 mph wind gust, but you have taken your reading , your projected distance is
    going to be a lot less than it should be because the wind gust was not part of the calculation. The best way do a calculation is to time the balls total flight and measure the horizontal and vertical distance from home plate. Once you have a time you can get a average and a initial velocity ,after not much to it.
    No one can calculate precise distance of a home run because precise ,data is never provide, but it can get you in ballpark. In closing here's one for you Joc Pederson hit one on 6/2/15
    at Coors Field Statcast had it at 477 feet and I can assure it was 500 feet. The ball hit the RCF upper deck 425 feet from home, 63 ft above the grd at 119.28 Mph, that high above the
    grd with a high initial velocity 477 is very short. That's my two cents. I'm sorry I don't type very well.






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    • PEDERSON 6-2-15 - COORS - 3RD INN - Copy.png
      Last edited by carsdaddy; 03-27-2020, 01:11 PM.

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      • Originally posted by carsdaddy View Post

        I study stadium layouts as a hobby ,of the old parks as well, so I do know how far the ball is from the plate vertically and horizontally, when it lands in the bleachers or upper deck. Calculations of home runs are credible, they use the same math to land rockets on the moon, but the home run calculation are not done as precise, so what you end up with is a legitimate estimate. I do my own calculation ,the math is never wrong the problem with the calculations, is the data gathered is sometime incorrect or internally manipulated to get a higher or low out come.
        Hit Trackers / Statcast use sensors to gather initial data on a home runs , the problem with that is once you take your initial reading if there are any changes in atmospheric conditions ,during the flight of to ball, it will alter your final distance. Lets say a batter hit one while it claim 2 second into the flight you get a 15 mph wind gust, but you have taken your reading , your projected distance is
        going to be a lot less than it should be because the wind gust was not part of the calculation. The best way do a calculation is to time the balls total flight and measure the horizontal and vertical distance from home plate. Once you have a time you can get a average and a initial velocity ,after not much to it.
        No one can calculate precise distance of a home run because precise ,data is never provide, but it can get you in ballpark. In closing here's one for you Joc Pederson hit one on 6/2/15
        at Coors Field Statcast had it at 477 feet and I can assure it was 500 feet. The ball hit the RCF upper deck 425 feet from home, 63 ft above the grd at 119.28 Mph, that high above the
        grd with a high initial velocity 477 is very short. That's my two cents. I'm sorry I don't type very well.





        You nailed it there, what I often bring up, for years. What about changes, a gust of wind against/behind the ball near the end of the drive, math can't pick that up.
        That must have happened a number of times, we just don't know how much some weather conditions can effect distance.

        Comment


        • Of course you are right that math can't make adjustments for changing atmospheric conditions, but when you time a home run once it lands you have the data for maybe 70 - 85 % of the entire distance the ball would have traveled so extending that data to get the remaining distance, yes you could run into atmospheric changes and we know at times you will,
          but when the
          data you have is collected maybe 10 feet from the batter , and the ball is going to be in the air from 5 - 7 seconds you will likely run into changes. Neither is 100% but caulations are done for a shorter distance,
          less chance of atmospheric changes and you have more data to work with. More time than more accurate than the scanor.
          With all of that being said I'd like to see more of the
          home run like Kingman's 530 at Wrigley or Wynn's 500 footer at Crosley Field , that hit the ground no debate to be had.

          Comment


          • Originally posted by carsdaddy View Post
            Of course you are right that math can't make adjustments for changing atmospheric conditions, but when you time a home run once it lands you have the data for maybe 70 - 85 % of the entire distance the ball would have traveled so extending that data to get the remaining distance, yes you could run into atmospheric changes and we know at times you will,
            but when the
            data you have is collected maybe 10 feet from the batter , and the ball is going to be in the air from 5 - 7 seconds you will likely run into changes. Neither is 100% but caulations are done for a shorter distance,
            less chance of atmospheric changes and you have more data to work with. More time than more accurate than the scanor.
            With all of that being said I'd like to see more of the
            home run like Kingman's 530 at Wrigley or Wynn's 500 footer at Crosley Field , that hit the ground no debate to be had.
            Sure, any time the ball is in flight weather change, wind speed, may change directions.
            Not here to knock Hit Tracker but there is just no way to be sure of where a ball that has been obstructed by seats or a wall will touch ground.
            How can it be done, it never touched ground. I am sure the Hit tracker math makes it close, thats about all.

            Yes as you mentioned kingman's left the park we know the landing spot.

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            • I would really like see it in action just out of curiosity.

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              • Don't know if you saw this one. Posted on line by a fan. From what I could gather, this was only one day and may be from 2017 or 2018. Really the year does not matter but check out the difference in distances. Actually what I thought, they do a good job in most, not much difference overall.Home runs.JPG
                Last edited by SHOELESSJOE3; 03-28-2020, 09:53 AM.

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                • Thank's , great article have something that I will post a little later a long those lines.

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                  • Originally posted by SHOELESSJOE3 View Post
                    Don't know if you saw this one. Posted on line by a fan. From what I could gather, this was only one day and may be from 2017 or 2018. Really the year does not matter but check out the difference in distances. Actually what I thought, they do a good job in most, not much difference overall.Home runs.JPG
                    The Official Site of Major League Baseball
                    Last edited by carsdaddy; 03-30-2020, 01:48 PM.

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                    • Statcast is inconsistence , it's supposed to provide a projected distants of how far the ball would ,had it's flight not been interrupted ,back to field level, in this case it only gives you the actual distance traveled.
                      Last edited by carsdaddy; 03-30-2020, 01:47 PM.

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                      • gallo pnc.png

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                        • GALlo xxxxxxx.jpg They didn't project the distance. I tried to sent video but i'm having trouble, you a can see it MLB .COM the date was 5/8/2019

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