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All-Time leader in pitches

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  • csh19792001
    replied
    Originally posted by RuthMayBond View Post
    http://mlb.mlb.com/stats/sortable.jsp#elem=[object+Object]&tab_level=child&click_text=Sortable+Player+pitchi ng&game_type=%27R%27&season=2013&season_type=ALL&l eague_code=%27MLB%27┬žionType=sp&statType=pitching& page=1&ts=1389479915568&split=&playerType=ALL&time frame=&sortColumn=np&sortOrder=%27desc%27&extended =1

    Sort the NP column. It obviously doesn't include everyone, but these may be actual totals, not estimates
    Clear as mud in March, RMB. Please provide a link the rest of us can actually access, and utilize.

    Thanks.

    Leave a comment:


  • RuthMayBond
    replied
    Originally posted by csh19792001 View Post
    Who are the top 10 all time in pitches thrown?
    http://mlb.mlb.com/stats/sortable.jsp#elem=[object+Object]&tab_level=child&click_text=Sortable+Player+pitchi ng&game_type=%27R%27&season=2013&season_type=ALL&l eague_code=%27MLB%27&sectionType=sp&statType=pitch ing&page=1&ts=1389479915568&split=&playerType=ALL& timeframe=&sortColumn=np&sortOrder=%27desc%27&exte nded=1

    Sort the NP column. It obviously doesn't include everyone, but these may be actual totals, not estimates

    Leave a comment:


  • csh19792001
    replied
    Who are the top 10 all time in pitches thrown?

    Leave a comment:


  • Brian McKenna
    replied
    i might be wrong but wasn't paul richards the first to give serious consideration to pitch count?

    was it harder for young to strike out a batter back in the day when men choked up and slapped at the ball? or was his speed/stuff that much greater than the norm that he had a relatively easy time doing so?

    i think it is interesting to note that rube waddell's strikeouts per game ratio is the best in baseball prior to World War II - he pitched in the same slap hitting era - he had johnson-esk speed but he was lefthanded - perhaps an oddity making him more difficult to handle
    Last edited by Brian McKenna; 01-23-2006, 06:31 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Ubiquitous
    replied
    Its odd what people will label vicious or how they view a discussion. I guess people see what they want to see.

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  • csh19792001
    replied
    Originally posted by 538280
    An educated guess would seem to tell me he was cubbieinexile? Am I right, Ubi?
    Yeah, I'd always figured so also, but we get no response from him. More curious is why he'd have to create a new anonymous account.

    Originally I thought he was "therealnod", but then he and the person posting under "therealnod" got into a vicious exchange/name calling contest, so that hypothesis died.

    Leave a comment:


  • 538280
    replied
    Originally posted by csh19792001
    What eponym did you work under prior to August of 2005, Ubi, and why'd you create a new account, if so?

    You oft speak as if you've been here since the beginning.
    An educated guess would seem to tell me he was cubbieinexile? Am I right, Ubi?

    Leave a comment:


  • csh19792001
    replied
    Originally posted by RuthMayBond
    You're telling me we have the pitch count of Cy Young, but we do NOT have caught stealing for the NL in 1950?
    We don't have the actual pitch counts from game logs (those records were only kept en masse from 1987-present, from what I can find). The lists above are the results of mathematical estimates based mainly on the flux of PA's, BB's, and K's thoughout history. They've been checked against the actual counts and have been proven to be pretty precise.

    But still, how many foul balls are hit, on average, during the course of a season against a pitcher? That estimate of 107,000 career pitches thrown for Cy Young is certainly tens of thousands of pitches too low, if it doesn't factor the lack of a foul strike rule into the equation (which, to my knowledge, it does not).

    I can send you the links to other related articles, if you're interested, RMB.

    Leave a comment:


  • RuthMayBond
    replied
    Originally posted by csh19792001
    From an August 2004 Hardball Times article: What Pitch Counts Hath Wrought.

    Let's compare these totals to those of some past greats:
    Nolan Ryan 90,211
    Steve Carlton 83,355
    Gaylord Perry 82,147
    Don Sutton 80,526
    Warren Spahn 79,613
    Bert Blyleven 77,310
    Tom Seaver 73,560
    Tommy John 72,708
    Early Wynn 72,607
    Robin Roberts 70,037
    Jim Kaat 69,743
    Red Ruffing 68,599
    Ferguson Jenkins 68,494
    Frank Tanana 65,931
    Ted Lyons 63,783
    Bobo Newsom 62,303
    Bob Feller 62,255
    Dennis Martinez 62,091
    Lefty Grove 61,642
    Bob Gibson 61,301
    Jack Morris 60,991
    Jim Palmer 60,666
    Jerry Koosman 60,425
    Jim Bunning 58,338
    Mickey Lolich 57,420

    Special knuckleballer category:
    Phil Niekro 85,110
    Charlie Hough 61,166

    Just for the hell of it, some deadballers:
    Cy Young 107,114
    Walter Johnson 87,528
    Pete Alexander 75,973
    Christy Mathewson 69,644

    My question is...do these estimates even factor in the lack of a foul strike rule for the first 13 seasons (4800 innings) of his career? I doubt it does.

    And if it doesn't, it's scary to think what Young's total would be had it factored in all of those extra pitches thrown simply due to the rule difference.
    You're telling me we have the pitch count of Cy Young, but we do NOT have caught stealing for the NL in 1950?

    Leave a comment:


  • csh19792001
    replied
    Originally posted by Ubiquitous
    Bringing back an old researcher thread. Ah, the classics. Some things never change.
    What eponym did you work under prior to August of 2005, Ubi, and why'd you create a new account, if so?

    You oft speak as if you've been here since the beginning.

    Leave a comment:


  • Ubiquitous
    replied
    Bringing back an old researcher thread. Ah, the classics. Some things never change.

    Leave a comment:


  • csh19792001
    replied
    From an August 2004 Hardball Times article: What Pitch Counts Hath Wrought.

    Let's compare these totals to those of some past greats:
    Nolan Ryan 90,211
    Steve Carlton 83,355
    Gaylord Perry 82,147
    Don Sutton 80,526
    Warren Spahn 79,613
    Bert Blyleven 77,310
    Tom Seaver 73,560
    Tommy John 72,708
    Early Wynn 72,607
    Robin Roberts 70,037
    Jim Kaat 69,743
    Red Ruffing 68,599
    Ferguson Jenkins 68,494
    Frank Tanana 65,931
    Ted Lyons 63,783
    Bobo Newsom 62,303
    Bob Feller 62,255
    Dennis Martinez 62,091
    Lefty Grove 61,642
    Bob Gibson 61,301
    Jack Morris 60,991
    Jim Palmer 60,666
    Jerry Koosman 60,425
    Jim Bunning 58,338
    Mickey Lolich 57,420

    Special knuckleballer category:
    Phil Niekro 85,110
    Charlie Hough 61,166

    Just for the hell of it, some deadballers:
    Cy Young 107,114
    Walter Johnson 87,528
    Pete Alexander 75,973
    Christy Mathewson 69,644

    My question is...do these estimates even factor in the lack of a foul strike rule for the first 13 seasons (4800 innings) of his career? I doubt it does.

    And if it doesn't, it's scary to think what Young's total would be had it factored in all of those extra pitches thrown simply due to the rule difference.

    Leave a comment:


  • Clay Dreslough
    replied
    I haven't seen the idea mentioned yet that the MULTIPLIERS THEMSELVES vary by era.

    You only GET a lot of strikeouts and walks if batters go deep in the count.

    Ryan pitched when there were more of both.

    So it follows that even when someone put the ball in play against Ryan, it was after he threw more pitches, on average, than Cy Young.

    BTW, this topic was just brought up on the Baseball Mogul boards so I'm in the process of doing a simulation of each era and will be posting my results here:

    http://www.sportsmogul.com/vbulletin...ad.php?t=96016

    Clay

    Leave a comment:


  • sopclod
    replied
    Originally posted by bly11
    I'm still guessing that Ol' Satch, pitching 150-200 games many years, threw more than either Cy or Nolan. But there's no way to document it ... sigh.
    *sigh* Once again I should point out that this implied to be restricted to the major leagues.

    Leave a comment:


  • bly11
    replied
    I'm still guessing that Ol' Satch, pitching 150-200 games many years, threw more than either Cy or Nolan. But there's no way to document it ... sigh.

    Leave a comment:

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