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top five weirdest players in history

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  • Allie Fox
    replied
    Perhaps not the weirdest but definitely up there for me was John Pacella of the Mets, Yankees, Twins, Orioles and Tigers. I can remember watching a game he pitched circa 1980. His hat fell off after every pitch.

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  • OleMissCub
    replied
    Originally posted by EdTarbusz View Post
    I don't think that I agree with that. Cobb came from the most viokent part of the country where violence against vlacks was especially common place. Parts of the deep south were in virtual anarchy after the civil war and Cobb must have grown up hearing stories about the violence in places like Louisiana and how was acceptable behavior. After reading more about him, I think he was high strung, especially after the circumstances of his early career, but I don't think he was unbalanced in any way.
    Hey, I'm a child of the deep south too and got a Masters in American History (particularly Civil War) before I got my law degree. So I definitely know what you are talking about.

    I'd be perfectly willing to believe that he wasn't unbalanced mentally. But it would also make sense to me if he were.

    Tyrus' behavior was definitely a perfect storm of circumstances:

    - He grew up in a time when Confederate Veterans were about the same age as Vietnam Veterans are today. Shelby Foote once said that what makes southerners so strange is that "they are the only Americans who have lost a war." That notion is still prevalent today, so it would have especially been prevalent in Cobb's time, when the vets of that war were just middle-aged. Ty's persecution complex comes from this.

    - His unbelievable desire to win at all costs because of his desire to prove his father wrong and then later to honor his father's memory by being the best.

    - His father's gruesome death at the hands of his mother screwed him up.

    - The horrible hazing he received from McIntyre, Killian, etal, compounded his already unsteady persecution complex.

    So, it is certainly plausible that he had no chemical imbalances and that his behavior was just a deadly combination of circumstances.

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  • EdTarbusz
    replied
    Originally posted by OleMissCub View Post

    Tyrus definitely had some sort of chemical imbalance.
    I don't think that I agree with that. Cobb came from the most viokent part of the country where violence against vlacks was especially common place. Parts of the deep south were in virtual anarchy after the civil war and Cobb must have grown up hearing stories about the violence in places like Louisiana and how was acceptable behavior. After reading more about him, I think he was high strung, especially after the circumstances of his early career, but I don't think he was unbalanced in any way.

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  • OleMissCub
    replied
    Originally posted by EdTarbusz View Post
    My feeling is that many white men from Georgia in Cobb's time would have had a bad reaction to a black person trying to touch them, especially if it was a stranger.
    Yes, but you have to clarify what "bad reaction" means. I'm not sure it's totally fair to blame it on a specific region either. I'd imagine a great many white men, regardless of region, wouldn't have appreciated being touched by a black man in 1908. It is my opinion that Cobb's absurd overreaction points much more toward his violent nature than his racist nature.

    Instances like this where Cobb violently assaulted a black person are often pointed at as proof that Cobb was some sort of super giant racist, even more racist than most people of his time. I disagree with that notion. Cobb beat up a HELL of a lot more white people than he ever did black people. To be sure, it was definitely his racism that got him into those situations, but it wasn't some sort of uber-racism (for his time) that caused him to violently attack the black people, rather it was his uber-violent attitude that took his racism to the next level. I'm not sure if that makes any sense...I'll try and phrase it another way.

    His racism was the cause of the initial confrontations in those instances, but his racism wasn't what caused him to take it to the next level and violently attack those unfortunates.

    Tyrus definitely had some sort of chemical imbalance.

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  • OleMissCub
    replied
    Originally posted by T206King View Post

    2- Ty Cobb- black man offered to shake his hand, he slapped him, then tried to stanggle his wife!!
    That's not weird. That's just a racist with an unbelievable temper.


    another time he ran into the stands and beat up a man with one arm(i beleive), he replies "i dont care if he has no arms"!!
    Again, not weird. All of his teammates thought his actions were justified and went on strike when he was suspended for it. Under your definition I guess that would make his entire team weird.

    spiked men regularly and injurying most.
    Nearly all of those people that he spiked are on record as saying that they thought he played clean and that it was their fault if they got in his way. MANY of his contemporaries testify that they never saw him spike anyone on the basepath intentionally with any malice. However, the historical record shows that he DID spike a few intentionally during his 20+ years, but the fact that his contemporaries didn't seem to think his spikings were anything out of the ordinary rejects your assertion that he was "weird" because of that.

    but loved the game!!!
    Understatement of the century.

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  • EdTarbusz
    replied
    Originally posted by T206King View Post

    2- Ty Cobb- black man offered to shake his hand, he slapped him, then tried to stanggle his wife!! another time he ran into the stands and beat up a man with one arm(i beleive), he replies "i dont care if he has no arms"!! spiked men regularly and injurying most. but loved the game!!!

    !
    My feeling is that many white men from Georgia in Cobb's time would have had a bad reaction to a black person trying to touch them, especially if it was a stranger.

    The man who Cobb went after in the stands had no hands. The man, Claude Leukker, alledgely called Cobb a 'half-******'.

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  • RuthMayBond
    replied
    Originally posted by Calif_Eagle
    Joe Charboneau, 1980 Rookie of The Year, with the Tribe. Lived in the clubhouse one season on the "AAA" IL Charleston W. Va. Charlies.
    My family went on vacation to Charleston in 1981. We were just going to catch a game and didn't find out until we got to Charleston that Joe had been sent down. He came over, signed for everyone

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  • Brownie31
    replied
    Originally posted by wamby
    That was Roberto Alomar in 1996. He was suspended for it, and his suspension carried over to the 1997 season. That said, he was allowed to play in the 1996 post-season.

    Belle had an incident where he shouted profanities at Hannah Storme during the 1995 World Series. She wanted him to move so that she could interview someone and he apparently told her to f--k herself. The way the National broacasters were talking about the Indians and their opponents in that post-season, Belle may have had a point.
    wamby: Thanks for clearing that up. Brownie31

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Originally posted by Brownie31
    wamby: Was Belle the one who spit on an umpire and made a nasty crack about the ump's son who had leukemia? Brownie31
    That was Roberto Alomar in 1996. He was suspended for it, and his suspension carried over to the 1997 season. That said, he was allowed to play in the 1996 post-season.

    Belle had an incident where he shouted profanities at Hannah Storme during the 1995 World Series. She wanted him to move so that she could interview someone and he apparently told her to f--k herself. The way the National broacasters were talking about the Indians and their opponents in that post-season, Belle may have had a point.
    Last edited by wamby; 04-08-2006, 06:45 PM.

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  • Brownie31
    replied
    Originally posted by wamby
    Around 1990, Belle threw a ball at an obnoxious fan in the left field stands at Cleveland Stadium. The fan was appently making fun of Belle's drinking problem (Belle had recently gone through rehab. This as the period when he changed his name from Joey to Albert.) I believe that he did hit the fan. I was at the game and couldn't tell what Belle was doing and I didn't find out about it until I was driving home.
    wamby: Was Belle the one who spit on an umpire and made a nasty crack about the ump's son who had leukemia? Brownie31

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Originally posted by Steve Jeltz
    Casey Stengel. He would lift his cap and birds would fly out. When Stengel heard the news during a rain delay that he was traded from the cellar dwelling Phillies to the Giants in 1920, he leapt off the trainers table, ran to the field and slid headfirst into every base.

    Bluesteve, I think you are referring to Dave Winfield, not Belle, that killed a bird. It occured in 1983 between innings of a game in Toronto, when a Winfield toss struck a bird flying by. Winfield was actually charged by the police for killing the bird.
    Around 1990, Belle threw a ball at an obnoxious fan in the left field stands at Cleveland Stadium. The fan was appently making fun of Belle's drinking problem (Belle had recently gone through rehab. This as the period when he changed his name from Joey to Albert.) I believe that he did hit the fan. I was at the game and couldn't tell what Belle was doing and I didn't find out about it until I was driving home.

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Originally posted by bkmckenna
    Waddell was mentally unstable - he just played in an era few were sensitive to it. Today, he may be considered weird but people would be more considerate and get him under a doctor's care instead of calling names and making jokes.

    In all likelyhood Cobb was unstable as well.
    I don't know if fans would be considerate about Waddell today. I can picture him pitching at Fenway or Yankee Stadium and some classy fans at those places chanting 're-tard, re-tard, re-tard'.

    I don't believe that Cobb was unstable at all. I think he was a man of his times and similar to a lot of white men from the deep south of that era.

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  • Calif_Eagle
    replied
    Joe Charboneau, 1980 Rookie of The Year, with the Tribe. Had fights in railroad boxcars for money against migrant workers. opened beer bottles with his eye sockets. performed surgery on himself with needle and thread. Dyed his hair some outre color like purple or blue one season, endearing himself to manager Dave Garcia. Lived in the clubhouse one season on the "AAA" IL Charleston W. Va. Charlies. And Joe was only in the show for a short time because of back trouble that went either undiagnosed or was just flat out mistreated. Had he had a career the length of Cap Anson's, who knows what levels of weirdness he may have attained?? lol

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  • Eastvanmungo
    replied
    Joaquin Andujar had some pretty good quotes and also once (after being pulled from a game) took a shower in his uniform.

    There's a story I heard about Dick Radatz being hired to throw baseballs at some guy's ass.

    Bugs Raymond might have been weird or maybe he was just an alcoholic... or maybe both.

    Rip Sewell should get some weird points for inventing the Eephus (blooper) pitch.

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  • Bluesteve32
    replied
    Originally posted by theAmazingMet
    What no love for the "Mad Hungarian"?
    Was goning to mention heim, but I saw your post.

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