Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Saddest moments in baseball

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #31
    Thank you Bill, for posting the Bergen story. I had read numerous capsules of the incident. This was the first time I've seen an actual detailed story..
    Keep posting those old stories... Feel free to toss in some ones about the little guy or average Joe too. I'll gladly read them. Thanks again.

    Comment


    • #32
      It's difficult to measure one trajedy against others. I know that Roberto Clemente's death on New Years Eve, December 31, 1972 had a tremendous impact on my life. Clemente once said "If you have a chance to help someone and you don't then you're wasting your time on this earth." He certainly backed up those words when he boarded that plane for earthquake ravaged Nicaragua.
      The saddest thing that ever happened in baseball for me however was and is the ongoing steroid/performance enhancer scandal and the coverup by MLB's officials. This has hurt the game, its numbers that go hand in hand and its loyal fans who patronize the game with their hard earned dollars and expect to see fainess played out on the diamond.
      Happy New Year to everyone!

      Comment


      • #33
        Originally posted by Bluesteve32
        Ray Chapman's death and the tragedy that followed his familiy afterward.

        The Negro League players never got to play MLB is sad, but they did have a stage to display their wares, albeit not agonst the major leaguer, but would barnstorm against them at times.

        Lou Gerhig's situation was very sad and has been immortalized by the movie, and was a personal tragedy.

        All strikes are bad, but the one in 1994 almost ruined baseball and was a big part of the demise of the Expos.

        I'd agree with number 2-4 of these but feel Roberto Clementes death was far sadder for Baseball than Chapmans. Pitchers have always thrown "brushback pitches" and this was one. Chapman just didn't get out of the way in time and it hit him. It wasn't Carl Mays fault at all...Chapman had a history of crowding the plate and paid for it. His death though tragic wasn't as sad as many other deaths in baseball before or since in my opinion. And I seem to agree that the saddest day in baseball was the day the strike culminated in the cancellation of the World Series in 1994 (not the start of the strike itself but the day the owners decided to cancel the Series).

        Comment


        • #34
          The saddest moment in baseball hasn't happened yet, but it might well in the next couple seasons.
          "I think about baseball when I wake up in the morning. I think about it all day and I dream about it at night. The only time I don't think about it is when I'm playing it."
          Carl Yastrzemski

          Comment


          • #35
            that's very cryptic troy - you must be having a cynical evening

            Comment


            • #36
              Originally posted by bkmckenna
              that's very cryptic troy - you must be having a cynical evening
              I was just thinking the same thing, although it's just after 1pm here.
              "I think about baseball when I wake up in the morning. I think about it all day and I dream about it at night. The only time I don't think about it is when I'm playing it."
              Carl Yastrzemski

              Comment


              • #37
                Originally posted by Goofy
                I'd agree with number 2-4 of these but feel Roberto Clementes death was far sadder for Baseball than Chapmans. Pitchers have always thrown "brushback pitches" and this was one. Chapman just didn't get out of the way in time and it hit him. It wasn't Carl Mays fault at all...Chapman had a history of crowding the plate and paid for it. His death though tragic wasn't as sad as many other deaths in baseball before or since in my opinion. And I seem to agree that the saddest day in baseball was the day the strike culminated in the cancellation of the World Series in 1994 (not the start of the strike itself but the day the owners decided to cancel the Series).
                The difference was that Roberto Clemente's death was not a result of something in a baseball game while Champan's was. I never have blamed Carl Mays and think he was unfairly blamed for "one of those tragedies" that just happen. He may have thrown the pitch, but who is to say that something similar may not have happened to Chapman by another pitcher on another day.

                That being said, Clemente's death was on a humanitarian mission and was not on the ballfield. Clemente had a career long enough to make the HOF and still be among the great players to have played the game. Chapman, on the other hand, played half as long as Roberto and was just really coming into his own as a great player on a good team. Chapman's wife and daughter also met with tragedy.
                http://www.baseballhalloffame.org/ex...eline_1961.jpg

                Comment


                • #38
                  without question, I would have to go with Lou Gehrig.

                  Comment

                  Ad Widget

                  Collapse
                  Working...
                  X