Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Saddest moments in baseball

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Saddest moments in baseball

    What in your opinion was the "saddest" event (or "non-event") in 20th Century Major League baseball?

    Here are some nominees. I suggest we each pick two from this list.

    I realize that you may have nominations I haven't thought of -- but I forgot to insert another choice for "OTHER'.
    108
    Babe Ruth never got to manage a major league club
    3.70%
    4
    Ray Chapman was killed by a wild pitch
    19.44%
    21
    Joe Jackson never got to show how he could hit in the Live Ball era
    11.11%
    12
    Satchel Paige was past age 40 before he made it to the Majors
    8.33%
    9
    Josh Gibson and other Negro League stars NEVER made it to the majors
    36.11%
    39
    St. Louis Browns NEVER won a World Championship
    0.00%
    0
    Other
    21.30%
    23
    Appling
    Registered User
    Last edited by Appling; 12-20-2005, 07:38 PM.
    Luke

  • #2
    Other.

    1. Lou Gehrig, one of the most wonderful men to don a uniform, being debilitated and snatched from the game, and then from this life, before his 38th birthday.

    2. Any baseball strike / work stoppage, regardless of the villain.

    and yes, 3... all the injustice related to race. Josh Gibson, Satchel Paige, and more men we will never even know.

    Comment


    • #3
      "I'm not here to talk about the past." Pretty sad day.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Appling
        What in your opinion was the "saddest" event (or "non-event") in 20th Century Major League baseball?

        Here are some nominees. I suggest we each pick two from this list.

        I realize that you may have nominations I haven't thought of -- but I forgot to insert another choice for "OTHER'.
        I've inserted the option for Other.
        I chose Gibson, et al. not being able to play in the Majors and Ray Chapman's death.
        Besides the strikes, John McSherry's opening day death in Cincinnati was horrifying to those who witnessed it and the ramifications were felt everywhere. It really sent the message out to umpires who didn't take care of themselves too well.
        Dave Bill Tom George Mark Bob Ernie Soupy Dick Alex Sparky
        Joe Gary MCA Emanuel Sonny Dave Earl Stan
        Jonathan Neil Roger Anthony Ray Thomas Art Don
        Gates Philip John Warrior Rik Casey Tony Horace
        Robin Bill Ernie JEDI

        Comment


        • #5
          94 Stike none of these others compare

          Comment


          • #6
            I went with the Josh Gibson thing. All the all others were personal tragedies or baseball events. The exclusion of the Negro players is a stain on our honor as a people.
            Buck O'Neil: The Monarch of Baseball

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Jake83
              94 Stike none of these others compare
              a man's death counts less than a work stoppage??

              Comment


              • #8
                Josh Gibson never got to show the white world how great he was

                Comment


                • #9
                  For baseball fans in general, and Brooklyn fans in particular, few events have been as achingly sad as the tragic accident that ended Roy Campanella's wonderful career and put the always-smiling, seemingly indestructible catcher in a wheelchair for the rest of his life.

                  The only comparable event would be the sight of an aging, ill and half-blind Jackie Robinson being led onto the field at the 1972 All-Star game.

                  Three months later, this unconquerable spirit and incomparable athlete would be gone.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by bkmckenna
                    a man's death counts less than a work stoppage??
                    I know this wasn't exactly aimed at me, but I did introduce the idea of the strike as an option here. So I feel maybe I should make myself clear.

                    It is sad that millions of fans the world over lost their chance to see the 1994 season (for example) to its proper end. It is sadder still that money meant more to some people than the national pastime itself. I don't claim to fully understand the circumstances surrounding the strikes; in fact I have begun a thread, specifically so I may better understand historical strikes.

                    But a Major League Baseball strike IS one of the saddest moments in baseball, and that's what the question asked.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I'm surprised no Brooklyn Dodger fan has said that California Baseball was the saddest moment.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by uthminsta
                        I'm surprised no Brooklyn Dodger fan has said that California Baseball was the saddest moment.
                        I'd think they'd rate the losing of the team as greater than what became of it.
                        Dave Bill Tom George Mark Bob Ernie Soupy Dick Alex Sparky
                        Joe Gary MCA Emanuel Sonny Dave Earl Stan
                        Jonathan Neil Roger Anthony Ray Thomas Art Don
                        Gates Philip John Warrior Rik Casey Tony Horace
                        Robin Bill Ernie JEDI

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Lou Gehrig for me was by far the saddest moment

                          A man struck down in his prime and he faced it with courage that signified him not only as a baseball player but as a man.

                          Second Babe Ruth

                          Babe Ruth gave so much too the game. He got taken advantage by everyone. He always had that hope but never came to be.
                          "I was pitching one day when my glasses clouded up on me. I took them off to polish them. When I looked up to the plate, I saw Jimmie Foxx. The sight of him terrified me so much that I haven't been able to wear glasses since." - Left Gomez

                          "(Lou) Gehrig never learned that a ballplayer couldn't be good every day." - Hank Gowdy

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            If that was a wild pitch, call me the Easter Bunny and tell me I've never procrastinated in my life.


                            Oh and, I forgot to choose 'other'... Since I didn't experience any other the other events, I would probably pick the Mike Darr incident.
                            charlesTG126
                            Mobile, Agile, Hostile.
                            Last edited by charlesTG126; 12-21-2005, 01:38 PM.
                            Back like I never left

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by uthminsta
                              I'm surprised no Brooklyn Dodger fan has said that California Baseball was the saddest moment.
                              Mmmhhh... sure that was the saddest day for a Brooklyn fan but not the saddest day in baseball.


                              Comment

                              Ad Widget

                              Collapse
                              Working...
                              X