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Ed Delahanty's death

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  • Buzzaldrin
    replied
    The night watchman had Delahanty's hat afterwards. Miss Scarlet in the ballroom with a lead pipe.

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  • Sultan_1895-1948
    replied
    Based on Kingston's original account, and then later when he made a point to emphasize Delahanty's level of intoxication, I think it's him. Colonel mustard in the libarary with the candlestick

    Leave a comment:


  • csh19792001
    replied
    Originally posted by NeverJustAGame
    Mike Sowell is the author of a great book entitled July 2, 1903.The book gives great insight into the life and death of Hall of Fame great Ed Delahanty.
    In the Sowell book it stated that Delahanty was also taking out life insurance policies by the day.

    He was depressive that year, perhaps manic, and his drinking binges had never been worse.

    It also states, though, that Delahanty had a very valuable diamond ring that was not on his hand when the body was recovered (although oddly, his necktie was still on). His brother in law identified the body.

    The night watchman was never indicted or even arrested, as far as I know, however he vacillated and gave several different accounts of the fateful night, which is suspicious at best. Many of the members of Delahanty's family suspected that he was robbed and/or murdered. I can't entirely discount their suspicions.

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  • mordeci
    replied
    I find the conspiracy theories extremely far fetched. He was tossed from a train for being drunk and found dead near by. If he was killed by gamblers or MLB thugs, they would have orchestrated the whole thing to be there when and where he was tossed. If there was foul play, then it was a spur of the moment, random crime, not pre-meditated. More likely he just fell off the bridge drunk.

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  • julusnc
    replied
    Originally posted by bkmckenna
    all complete supposition
    The entire subject is.Glad you pointed out the obvious

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  • Brian McKenna
    replied
    Originally posted by NeverJustAGame
    Many believe he was robbed because he was known to keep alot of cash on his person and also while on his last trip was carrying jewelry belonging to his wife.

    Some say he might have been killed by the powers that be for he was the bright star that was known to jump teams at the drop of a hat.

    Also death from gamblers he might have owed.Not baseball gamblers but horse and dog racing gamblers.
    all complete supposition

    Leave a comment:


  • NeverJustAGame
    replied
    Mike Sowell is the author of a great book entitled July 2, 1903.The book gives great insight into the life and death of Hall of Fame great Ed Delahanty.

    Many believe he was robbed because he was known to keep alot of cash on his person and also while on his last trip was carrying jewelry belonging to his wife.

    Some say he might have been killed by the powers that be for he was the bright star that was known to jump teams at the drop of a hat.

    Also death from gamblers he might have owed.Not baseball gamblers but horse and dog racing gamblers.

    Leave a comment:


  • Buzzaldrin
    replied
    Originally posted by bkmckenna
    The 35-year-old died as the lifetime leader in batting average.
    That's not true. At the end of the 1902 season, Willie Keeler's lifetime average was .371 (and Ross Barnes' was .359, but maybe you don't count NA).

    Leave a comment:


  • yest
    replied
    In any case I remember reading one time that Ed hit the longest home run on record. That he hit a home run into the back of a moving boxcar that travelled a great distance or something of the sort. I barely recall the story as I was like 9 when I read it.
    I think that was one of his brothers who played for Boston

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  • Brian McKenna
    replied
    In June 1903 with his Washington Nationals team on a western trip, Delahanty didn’t show up for a game in Cleveland, probably due to drunkenness. Manager Tom Lofton suspended the outfielder but allowed him to travel with the team. On July 2nd Delahanty became uncontrollable on the train even threatening passengers with a razor. The conductor escorted the drunken slugger off the train at Niagara Falls, Ontario, Canada as the train was about to cross an international bridge.
    The train pulled away and the drunken Delahanty pushed passed a guard and followed it. The draw was open on the bridge. Delahanty’s body was discovered a week later twenty miles down the falls. He had apparently fallen off the bridge and been swept away.
    Last edited by Brian McKenna; 12-21-2005, 11:27 AM.

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  • pretorius
    replied
    Nothing on his death other then what you relate but I wonder if Malamud was borrowing a little from Big Ed in the book The Natural with the boxcar/woman thing?

    In any case I remember reading one time that Ed hit the longest home run on record. That he hit a home run into the back of a moving boxcar that travelled a great distance or something of the sort. I barely recall the story as I was like 9 when I read it.

    Edit: Well you mademe curious so I looked for a sec and found this account http://www.niagarafallsreporter.com/delahanty.html

    I also checked my Natural question and apparently malamud was merging alot of people like Ted Williams amd especially an incident involving Eddie Waitkus.
    Last edited by pretorius; 12-20-2005, 11:13 PM.

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  • Blackout
    started a topic Ed Delahanty's death

    Ed Delahanty's death

    Can some of you who are more informed on the subject of Ed's death in 1903 fill me in?

    I know he was drunk and ordered to leave a train and fell off or something and landed in a river

    but was there ever thought of foul play being involved? etc?

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