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  • #46
    In 1941 Pete was 54 years old and Paige was 35 or so. 37 at the oldest and about 33 at the youngest.

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    • #47
      Originally posted by Ubiquitous View Post
      In 1941 Pete was 54 years old and Paige was 35 or so. 37 at the oldest and about 33 at the youngest.
      Just joshin =P

      But you must agree that Pete usually looks to be like 50 even when he's 30.
      Originally posted by Cougar
      "Read at your own risk. Baseball Fever shall not be responsible if you become clinically insane trying to make sense of this post. People under 18 must read in the presence of a parent, guardian, licensed professional, or Dr. Phil."

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      • #48
        Live Ball era, Pete Alexander vs Walter Johnson with home/road splits


        Player Years IP W L pct ERA ERA+
        Walter Johnson, home 1920-26 937 62 42 .596 2.91
        Walter Johnson, road 1920-26 778.2 53 40 .570 3.59
        Walter Johnson, total 1920-26 1715.2 115 82 .584 3.22 123

        Pete Alexander, home 1920-28 1232.2 90 41 .687 2.77
        Pete Alexander, road 1920-28 1047 66 56 .541 3.26
        Pete Alexander, total 1920-28 2283.1 156 97 .617 2.99 131
        Last edited by pheasant; 02-09-2012, 07:52 PM.

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        • #49
          The Best Natural Hitter--The Smartest Ball Player---The Speediest Hurler---The Greatest Pitcher---These Stand Out in Vivid Relief Against the Memories of Twenty Years

          Comprising an Interview with Walter Johnson, Baseball Magazine, October, 1929

          "Great pitchers have not necessarily excelled in speed. I remember Christy Mathewson very well. I saw him pitch a number of games. He is commonly rated as the best all-round pitcher who ever lived. That may be true. I hesitate to say anything which would detract to the slightest degree from the well-earned reputation of a man who was universally respected in life and who is now dead. But I am going to be honest with my opinion, such as it is. With all due respect to Mathewson, I think Grover Alexander had a little on him. I can think of nothing that Mathewson had that Alexander didn't have. Certainly Alexander had a marvelous fast ball. Not so speedy as some, it was particularly good because it was so deceptive. My fast ball jumped and frequently broke up. Alexander's fast ball broke down. Mathewson gained fame in his later years because of his fadeaway. But if he ever had a better fadeaway than Alec, I never saw it. Alec's screw ball is proverbial. Mathewson's control was gilt-edged. But even there I think Alexander could go him one better. Alec's control is as near perfection as it's humanly possible to get. I doubt if any pitcher ever lived who could put the ball as near where he wanted it to go, game in and game out, as Grover Alexander. I doubt if any pitcher will ever excel him in that respect.

          Mathewson made a grand reputation and deserved it all. Usually, however, he had a strong, scrappy team behind him. Alexander has had many weak teams behind him in the years of his career.

          They tell many tales of Matty's pitching wisdom. I have no doubt that he was a master of the craft. And yet, I can not think of anything worth knowing in pitching that Alexander doesn't know.

          Alexander is what I never was, a well-rounded pitcher. He has everything. I am talking now of the years of his prime. Alexander is an old veteran now and can not last much longer, but he lasted longer than I did. And he lasted because he was such a well-rounded pitcher. When my great speed left me, my bid to pitching greatness went with it. When Alexander's speed left him, he fell back on an all-round assortment of stuff and an unbeatable control."

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          • #50
            deleted post.

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            • #51
              From the book My Greatest Day in Baseball (1968), stories collected by John P. Carmichael:

              Grover Cleveland Alexander

              as told to Francis J. Powers

              Grover Cleveland Alexander, born February 26, 1887, in St. Paul, Nebraska, thrilled two generations of fans with his effortless pitching grace. He pitched the Phillies to their first pennant in 1915, and later came on to help the Cardinals to their flags of 1926 and 1928. In 20 years, "Old Pete" compiled 373 victories in 686 games. Poor in health during his last few years, Alex passed away on November 4, 1950.


              My greatest day in baseball has to be the seventh game of the 1926 World Series between the Cards and Yankees. If I picked any other game the fans would think I was crazy. I guess just about everyone knows the story of that game; it has been told often enough. How I came in as a relief pitcher in the seventh inning, with two out and the bases filled with Yankees, and fanned Tony Lazzeri to protect the Cards' 3-2 lead. Actually, that was my greatest game, but it gave me not one, but three, thrills. But if it wasn't I'm stuck with it like George Washington with the hatchet.

              There must be a hundred versions of what happened in the Yankee Stadium that dark, chilly afternoon. It used to be that everywhere I went, I'd hear a new one and some were pretty far-fetched. So much so that two-three years ago I ran across Lazzeri in San Francisco and said: "Tony, I'm getting tired of fanning you." And Tony answered: "Maybe you think I'm not." So I'd like to tell you my story f what took place in that game and the day before.

              There are stories that I celebrated that night before and had a hangover when Manager Rogers Hornsby called me from the bull pen to pitch to Lazzeri. That isn't the truth. On Saturday, I had beaten the Yankees 10-2 to make the series all even. To refresh your memory on the series, the Yankees won the opener and we took the next two. Then the Yanks won two straight and needed only one more for the world's championship and I beat 'em in the sixth.

              In the clubhouse after that game, Hornsby came over to me and said: "Alex, if you want to celebrate tonight, I wouldn't blame you. But go easy for I may need you tomorrow."

              I said: "Okay, Rog. I'll tell you what I'll do. I'll ride back to the hotel with you and I'll meet you tomorrow morning and ride out to the park with you." Hell - I wanted to win that series and get the big end of the money as much as anyone.

              Jesse Haines started the seventh game for us, pitchin' against Waite Hoyt. We figured Jesse would give the Yanks all they could handle. He was a knuckle-baller and had shut 'em out in the third game. Early in the game, Hornsby said to me: "Alex, go down to the bull pen and keep your eye on Sherdel [Willie] and Bell [Herman]. Keep 'em warmed up and if I need help I'll depend on you to tell me which one looks best."

              The bull pen in the Yankee Stadium is under the bleachers and when you're down there you can't tell what's going on out on the field only for the yells of the fans overhead. When the bench wants to get in touch with the bull pen there's a telephone. It's the only real fancy, modern bull pen in baseball. Well, I was sitting around down there, not doing much throwing, when the phone rang and an excited voice said: "Send in Alexander."

              I don't find out what happened until the game is over. Haines is breezing along with a 3-2 lead when he develops a blister on the knuckle of the first finger of his right hand. The blister breaks and the finger is so sore he can't hold the ball. Before Rog knows it the Yanks have the bases filled.

              I take a few hurried throws and then start for the box. There's been a lot of stories about how long it took me to walk from the bull pen to the mound and how I looked, and all that. Well, as I said, I didn't know what had happened when I was called.

              So when I come out from under the bleachers I see the bases filled and Lazzeri standing in the box. Tony is up there all alone, with everyone in that Sunday crowd watching him. So I just said to myself, "Take your time. Lazzeri isn't feeling any too good up there and let him stew." But I don't remember picking any four-leaf clovers, as some of the stories said.

              I get to the box and Bob O'Farrell, our catcher, comes out to meet me. "Let's start right where we left off yesterday," Bob said. Yesterday [Saturday] Lazzeri was up four times against me without getting anything that looked like a hit. He got one off me in the second game of the series, but with one out of seven I wasn't much worried about him, although I knew that if he got all of a pitch, he'd hit t a long piece.

              I said okay to O'Farrell. We'll curve him. My first pitch was a curve and Tony missed. Holding the ball in his hand, O'Farrell came out to the box again. "Look, Alex," he began. "This guy will be looking for that curve next time. We curved him all the time yesterday. Let's give him a fast one." I agreed and poured one in, right under his chin. There was a crack and I knew that ball was hit hard. A pitcher can tell pretty well from the sound. I spun around to watch the ball and all the Yankees on bases were on their way. But the drive had a tail-end fade and landed foul by eighteen feet in the left-field bleachers.

              So I said to myself, "No more of that for you, my lad." Bob signed for another curve and I gave him one. Lazzeri swung where that curve started but not where it finished. The ball got a hunk of the corner and then finished outside. Well we were out of that jam but there were still two innings to go.

              I set the Yanks down in order in the eighth and got the first two in the ninth. And then Ruth came up. The Babe had scored the Yanks' first run of the game with a tremendous homer and he was dynamite to any pitcher. I didn't take any chances on him but worked the count to three and two, pitching for the corners all the time. Then Babe walked and I wasn't very sorry either when I saw him perched on first. Of course Bob Meusel was the next hitter and he'd hit over 40 homers that season and would mean trouble.

              If Meusel got hold of one it could mean two runs and the series, so I forgot all about Ruth and got ready to work on Meusel. I'll never know why the guy did it but on my first pitch to Meusel, the Babe broke for second. He (or Miller Huggins) probably figured that it would catch us by surprise. I caught the blur of Ruth starting for second as I pitched and then came the whistle of the ball as O'Farrell rifled to second. I wheeled around and there was one of the grandest sights of my life. Hornsby, his foot anchored on the bag and his gloved hand outstretched was waiting for Ruth to come in. There was the series and my second big thrill of the day. The third came when Judge Landis mailed out the winners' checks for $5,584.51.

              I guess, I had every thrill that could come to a pitcher except one. I never pitched a no-hit game. I pitched 16 one-hitters during my time in the National League and that's coming pretty close, pretty often.

              You know you think of a lot of funny things that happened in baseball, sittin' around gabbing like this. I remember when I was with the Cubs, and I was with them longer than any other club, we were playing the Reds in a morning game on Decoration Day. The game was in the 11th when I went up to bat and I said: "If they give me a curve ball, I'll hit it in the bleachers. My wife's got fried chicken at home for me." They gave me a curve and I hit 'er in the bleachers.
              "It ain't braggin' if you can do it." Dizzy Dean

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              • #52
                Some of Alexander's 1926 Redbird teammates talk about that famous relief stint in Game 7 of the World Series that year, from The Spirit of St. Louis: A History of the St. Louis Cardinals and Browns, by Peter Golenbock:

                Rogers Hornsby: "It was October 10, a Sunday, cold and drizzling in Yankee Stadium. So cold in fact, that only 38,093 persons turned out in New York for the seventh game of that Series."

                Les Bell: "We were staying at the Alamac Hotel, at 71st and Broadway, and when we woke up and looked out the window we didn't think there would be a game. It was a miserable day. Ordinarily we would have been out at the ballpark by eleven-thirty, but the day was so gloomy we just sat around the lobby, waiting for word. Then Judge Landis called up and said, 'Get your asses out there, boys. We're going to play.' So we piled into taxicabs and headed up to the Stadium.

                "[Jesse] Haines started the seventh game for us and he pitched just fine. We got three runs in the fourth inning and I'll tell you, I should have got credit for a base hit on the ball that Koenig got his hands on. Why, sure I remember it. You certainly so remember those hits that they took away from you. I can tell you just what happened. We were losing, 1-0, to Ruth's home run. Then in the top of the fourth Jim Bottomley got a hit. I came up and hit one way over in the hole on the left side. Koenig went far to his right and fumbled the ball. They gave him an error on it, but there was no way he could have thrown me out, even if he had handled it cleanly. No way.

                "Then Chick Hafey lifted a little fly ball that fell into short left for a hit and the bases were filled. And then came a big break. Bob O'Farrell hit a fly ball to Meusel in left-center, and Meusel dropped it. Just like that. Easiest fly ball you ever saw. What must have happened was he had set his mind on getting that ball and throwing home to try and catch Bottomley -- Meusel had an outstanding arm. So he might have been thinking more about throwing it than catching it and maybe that's what brought about the error. But, gee, when that ball dropped out of his hands, the silence in that big ballpark was really stunning. It was a hometown crowd, of course, and they couldn't believe what they had seen. Nobody could.

                "Then came the last of the seventh. The score was 3-2 now. With two out, they loaded the bases against Haines and Tony Lazzeri was up. Haines was a knuckleball pitcher. He held that thing with his knuckles and he threw it hard and he threw it just about all the time. Well, his fingers had started to bleed from all the wear and tear, so he called a halt. Rog and the rest of us walked over to the mound.

                "'Can you throw it anymore?' Rog asked him.
                "'No,' Jess said. 'I can throw the fastball, but not the knuckler.'
                "'Well,' said Hornsby, 'we don't want any fastballs to this guy.'
                "You see, we had been throwing Lazzeri nothing but breaking balls away and had been having pretty good luck with him."

                Rogers Hornsby: "He had worn the skin off his index finger of his right hand, throwing knuckleballs. He had to come out of the ball game. Willie Sherdel, a left-hander, was already warming up in the bullpen.

                "We didn't have any telephones to the bullpen like they do today. I just waved and motioned for the guy to come on in. I wanted Grover Cleveland Alexander, who was thirty-nine years old, had pitched and won a complete game the day before for us. Some people figured Alexander might even be drunk during the game.

                "There was a little delay before anybody came out of the bullpen, which was so far down the left field corner you could hardly see it. I yelled, 'Alexander,' and when he didn't come out real quick, people thought he was asleep or something. Then he came out, walking real slouchy-like. Alexander could have been drunk for all I cared, but he certainly wasn't. Hell, I'd rather have him pitch a crucial game for me drunk than anyone I've ever known sober. He was that good."

                Bob O'Farrell: "I had caught Alex for years on the Cubs before we were both traded to the Cardinals. I think he was as good or as better than any pitcher who ever lived. He had perfect control and a great screwball. He used to call it a fadeaway, same as Mathewson.

                "I don't believe Alex was much of a drinker before he went into the Army. After he got back from the war, though, he had a real problem. When he struck out Lazzeri, he'd been out on a drunk the night before and was still feeling the effects. See, Alex had pitched for us the day before and won. He had beaten the Yankees in the second game of the World Series, and again in the sixth game, pitching complete games both times. He was thirty-nine years old then, and naturally wasn't expecting to see any more action.

                "However, after the sixth game was over, Rogers Hornsby, our manager, told Alex that if Jesse Haines got in any trouble the next day, he would be the relief man. So he should take care of himself. Well, Alex didn't really intend to take a drink that night. But, some of his 'friends' got hold of him and thought they were doing him a favor by buying him a drink. Well, you weren't doing Alex any favor by buying him a drink, because he just couldn't stop.

                "So in the seventh inning of the seventh game, Alex is tight asleep in the bullpen, sleeping off the night before, when trouble comes.

                "So Hornsby decides to call in old Alex, even though we know he'd just pitched the day before and had been up most of the night. So in he comes, shuffling in slowly from the bullpen to the pitching mound.

                "'Can you do it?' asks Hornsby.
                "'I can try,' says Alex."

                Jesse Haines: "They said Alex was drunk when he came to the mound. I don't think he was. I don't know, though, because I didn't stay there. I went into the clubhouse. He couldn't have been drunk, not with the way he pitched those two and a third innings. They never gave the old fellow the credit he deserves."

                Les Bell: "In came Alec, shuffling through the gloom from out of left field. You ever see him? Lean, long, lanky guy. An old Nebraskan. Took his time at everything, except pitching. Then he worked like a machine. Well, Alec was a little bit of the country psychologist out on that mound. I guess a lot of your great pitchers are. He knew it was Lazzeri's rookie year, and that here it was, seventh game of the World Series, two out and the bases loaded and the score 3-2. Lazzeri had to be anxious up there. This is not to take anything away from Lazzeri -- he later became a great hitter -- but at that moment he was a youngster up against a master. And don't think when Alec walked in it wasn't slower than ever -- he wanted Lazzeri to stand up there as long as possible, thinking about the situation. And he just knew Tony's eyes would pop when he saw that fastball."

                Grover Cleveland Alexander: "I don't think I'll ever forget that day. The biggest moment I ever had. You know, they say I stopped to pick daisies on my way from the bullpen that day. I didn't, but hell, what did they want me to do, run for the mound? I'd a been all out of breath.

                "But you know when I started out, and you know how far that bullpen is, I could see Lazzeri already at the plate. He was knocking the dirt from his spikes and hopping around, and I just thought to myself, 'Well, I'll give you plenty of time to get more dirt in those spikes.' So I did stop to look at the center fielder's glove, and I paused to take a squint at the shortstop's glove, but I eventually got there.

                "I wasn't worried about the spot I was in. Naw. You know, I always had one motto, and it was this: 'I'm a better pitcher than you are a hitter.' I carried that idea into every game. Besides, Lazzeri hadn't bothered me in the Series. Of course, if he'd a hit one, it would have been too bad. But he didn't."

                Rogers Hornsby: "I trotted about halfway out to the outfield to meet Alex. 'Well, the bases are full,' I told him. 'Lazzeri's up, and there ain't no place to put him.'"

                Bob O'Farrell: "Alex said, 'There just don't seem to be no place to put Lazzeri. Guess I'll have to get him out.'"

                Rogers Hornsby: "Alex threw only three warmup pitches. He didn't need to throw fifteen or twenty minutes like most pitchers to get warmed up. Then he fixed his little cap, fooled around with his belt, and looked to see if everybody was ready."

                Les Bell: There are so many legends associated with that strikeout. For instance, they say Alec was drunk, or hung over, when he came in. And they say Hornsby walked out to left field to meet him, to look in his eyes and make sure they were clear. And so on. All a lot of bunk. It's too bad they say these things. Now in the first place, if you stop to think about it, no man could have done what Alec did if he was drunk or even a little bit soggy. Not the way his mind was working and not the way he pitched. It's true that he was a drinker and that he had a problem with it. Everybody knows that. But he was not drunk when he walked into the ball game that day. No way. No way at all, for heaven's sake. And as far as Hornsby walking out to meet him, that's for the birds too. Rog met him at the mound, same as the rest of us.

                "He wanted to get ahead of Lazzeri. That was his idea. But it had to be on a bad ball. He was going to throw that first one fast to Lazzeri, high and tight, far enough inside so that even if Lazzeri hit it solid it would have to go foul, because in order to get good wood on it, Tony would have to be way out in front with the bat. If he didn't get good wood on it, then he would be hitting it on the handle and maybe breaking his bat. What made him think Lazzeri would be swinging at a bad ball?"

                Rogers Hornsby: "Alexander's first pitch to Lazzeri was wide for a ball. Lazzeri took the next one for a strike. Then Lazzeri laid into the third pitch and it was a home run all the way. The Yankees were on top of the dugout steps to run and meet Lazzeri at home plate. And I was going to be the biggest bum in the history of the World Series. I knew it, too. But just before the ball went into the left field stands, where it was supposed to go, we got a break. The wind pushed the ball a little more to the left. Enough to make the drive foul by about ten inches."

                Les Bell: "After the conference on the mound, we all went back to our positions and Alec got set to work. Sure enough, the pitch to Lazzeri is the fastball in tight, not a strike. Well, Tony jumped at it and hit the hell out of it, a hard drive down the left field line. Now, for fifty years that ball has been traveling. It has been foul anywhere from an inch to twenty feet, depending on who you're listening to or what you're reading. But I was standing on third base, and I'll tell you -- it was foul all the way. All the way.

                "And then you should have seen Lazzeri go after two breaking balls on the low outside corner of the plate. He couldn't have hit them with a ten foot pole.

                "Then Alec shuffled off the mound toward the dugout. I ran by him and said something like, 'Nice going, Alec.' He turned his head toward me and had just a shadow of a smile on his lips. Then he took off his glove and flipped it onto the bench, put on his Cardinal sweater, and sat down.

                "You know, a lot of people think Lazzeri's strikeout ended the game. You'd be surprised how many people I've spoken to through the years think it was the ninth inning. But hell, we still had two more innings to go."
                Last edited by Herr28; 09-17-2014, 04:20 PM.
                "It ain't braggin' if you can do it." Dizzy Dean

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                • #53
                  Unless someone has already referred to this, old Alex, after his baseball days, was really a pitiful sight, according to some. Too bad he couldn't have gotten a job as a pitching coach at one of the countries universities, as many former players did. It was a decent living after playing ball and some made more money doing that then they had ever made playing baseball.

                  Story goes that Alexander did not even have a suit to appear at the 1939 Cooperstown Induction of Hall of Fame players. Being one of the original members was an honor, but Alex reportedly had to borrow a suit from somewhere before traveling to upstate New York.

                  Here's his picture with the other greats, Ty Cobb arriving too late for the picture (no doubt intentionally so as to not have to share media time with the more popular Babe Ruth). A sad man and a sad life, but truly, one of THE greatest pitchers of all time throwing that "heavy" ball.Copy of original cooperstown bunch.jpg

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                  • #54
                    Originally posted by PaulHerbert View Post
                    Here's his picture with the other greats, Ty Cobb arriving too late for the picture (no doubt intentionally so as to not have to share media time with the more popular Babe Ruth).
                    Please offer some factual support for this negative connotation of Cobb.

                    To my knowledge, Cobb and Ruth appeared side-by-side dozens if not 100s of times on the diamond, on the golf course, at baseball affairs and numerous other functions.

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                    • #55
                      Originally posted by Brian McKenna View Post
                      Please offer some factual support for this negative connotation of Cobb.

                      To my knowledge, Cobb and Ruth appeared side-by-side dozens if not 100s of times on the diamond, on the golf course, at baseball affairs and numerous other functions.
                      Cobb claimed he got caught up in bad traffic and that was the reason he didn`t make it in time for this group picture.It has been suggested that the real truth for Cobb`s tardiness was that Cobb wanted to avoid having to see Judge Landis and have to shake his hand.Cobb felt that Landis had acted too slow in clearing his name(and Speaker`s) after the gambling/thrown game controversy back in '26.
                      Last edited by Nimrod; 09-22-2014, 08:27 AM.

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                      • #56
                        In 1939, Cobb lived in Menlo Park, California. On his way to Cooperstown, he stopped and attended a Tigers game in Detroit on 11 June.

                        The Baltimore Sun and Washington Post on 13 June 1939, the day after the ceremonies, states that Cobb was delayed because of illness, stomach troubles. He missed the entire dedications. Per the Chicago Tribune quoting Cobb, Cobb stopped at a hospital in Utica, NY for "indigestion." Per Cobb, "I was washing up over at Knox College, the only place in Cooperstown where I could get accommodations, when I heard my name read over the radio. I didn't know the ceremonies began that early."

                        I've never really grasped the claim of an intentional delay in arriving. Perhaps the greatest ballplayer that ever lived ducked out on the ceremonies citing him among the greats because he didn't want to face someone?? Doesn't sound like the man I've read about that faced many an adversity. This wasn't just some banquet; anticipation had been building to that day for at least three years. It was the supposed 100th anniversary of the game. Plus, Cobb was traveling with three of his adult children. I guess dad wanted to show his kids how to shrink and hide from the travails of life.

                        People can make any claims they want. That's the great thing with innuendo and off-handed remarks. I wonder what would happen if we all at BBF required facts and logic instead of accepting hear-say and whatever else that might come to mind.

                        Ruth and Cobb attended a fair together on 13 June.
                        Last edited by Brian McKenna; 09-22-2014, 02:22 PM.

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                        • #57
                          Originally posted by Brian McKenna View Post
                          In 1939, Cobb lived in Menlo Park, California. On his way to Cooperstown, he stopped and attended a Tigers game in Detroit on 11 June.

                          The Baltimore Sun and Washington Post on 13 June 1939, the day after the ceremonies, states that Cobb was delayed because of illness, stomach troubles. He missed the entire dedications. Per the Chicago Tribune quoting Cobb, Cobb stopped at a hospital in Utica, NY for "indigestion." Per Cobb, "I was washing up over at Knox College, the only place in Cooperstown where I could get accommodations, when I heard my name read over the radio. I didn't know the ceremonies began that early."

                          I've never really grasped the claim of an intentional delay in arriving. Perhaps the greatest ballplayer that ever lived ducked out on the ceremonies citing him among the greats because he didn't want to face someone?? Doesn't sound like the man I've read about that faced many an adversity. This wasn't just some banquet; anticipation had been building to that day for at least three years. It was the supposed 100th anniversary of the game. Plus, Cobb was traveling with three of his adult children. I guess dad wanted to show his kids how to shrink and hide from the travails of life.

                          People can make any claims they want. That's the great thing with innuendo and off-handed remarks. I wonder what would happen if we all at BBF required facts and logic instead of accepting hear-say and whatever else that might come to mind.

                          Ruth and Cobb attended a fair together on 13 June.
                          I have a book back home in my office about the opening of the museum in Cooperstown. I think it said Cobb was running late, nothing about trying to avoid anyone or anything (like the photo). Wasn't it after that ceremony in Cooperstown when Ruth and Cobb agreed to go golfing against each other? Or at least laid the foundation for their big charity golf tour a few years later?

                          I had never heard (or read) about any desire for Cobb to avoid Landis. In that book I read 5 or 6 years ago (at least) the author did mention Cobb traveling with his adult kids. he also said that they stopped by Detroit for a little while, where Cobb was connecting with a few people he used to know there, and his kids got to see just how popular their dad was in that town. They also went to see a Tigers game there, and Cobb went through the locker room talking with the team and shaking hands. There are some paragraphs in there where a conversation between Cobb and many of the players was recorded, including his former player Charlie Gehringer (who Cobb said some great things about in front of the team and reporters).

                          I will look later, but I think it was just a matter of running late during that long trip with his kids. Absolutely nothing about Ty Cobb trying to spite the ceremonies, any attendees, and certainly not the fans. He would have wanted to be there and recognized among the initial greats inducted I believe.
                          "It ain't braggin' if you can do it." Dizzy Dean

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                          • #58
                            Cobb didn't miss the entire dedication. He arrived shortly after the famous photo was taken. We know this because there are photos of him at the ceremony and taking part in the festivities. I wouldn't put much stock in newspaper accounts when it comes to reasons why people do things. Newspapers back then were extremely whitewashed and sanitized.

                            The stomach bug he blamed on one of his children though Dennis Corcoran in his book about the HoF cermonies stated that many years later Cobb would admit that he didn't want to take a picture with Landis who he was still mad at for the whole game throwing scandal.

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                            • #59
                              Originally posted by Ubiquitous View Post
                              Cobb didn't miss the entire dedication. He arrived shortly after the famous photo was taken. We know this because there are photos of him at the ceremony and taking part in the festivities. I wouldn't put much stock in newspaper accounts when it comes to reasons why people do things. Newspapers back then were extremely whitewashed and sanitized.

                              The stomach bug he blamed on one of his children though Dennis Corcoran in his book about the HoF cermonies stated that many years later Cobb would admit that he didn't want to take a picture with Landis who he was still mad at for the whole game throwing scandal.
                              Did he miss all the speeches, or did he arrive towards the end of them?
                              "It ain't braggin' if you can do it." Dizzy Dean

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                              • #60
                                The contemporary article I read today said, and I think this is the word they used, that he missed the dedications. What that specifically entailed i'm not positive. But it said he was later given his engraved bat. Either way, I don't see him traveling 3000 miles just for the after parties.

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