Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Walter Johnson Thread

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    Where do you get all these nice pictures from ? Do you just google it ?
    ------------------------------------------------------------
    Here are some of my sources.

    1. Vast majority come from my personal baseball book collection, and those from nearby libraries.

    2. http://pro.corbis.com/default.aspx

    3. http://images.google.com/advanced_image_search?hl=en

    4. http://images.search.yahoo.com/searc...anced?ei=UTF-8
    Last edited by Bill Burgess; 02-18-2007, 11:19 AM.

    Comment


    • #17
      I have the Big Train as #1 but Clemens will likely pass him or at least tie him in my ratings if he plays next season.
      2009 World Series Champions, The New York Yankees

      Comment


      • #18
        Does anyone, have any idea on how Walter Johnson threw so hard? I mean, it says he never raised his back leg when he threw. How did he get so much power?

        Comment


        • #19
          Another question...was his control really as good as his BB/IP #'s would suggest? Or was it more a case of him not having to worry about working the corners since he could throw the ball past most hitters?

          Comment


          • #20
            Guess I should've read the ENTIRE poll before I voted. I just saw "I rank Walter #1 all-time", clicked that one, and submitted my vote. I also rank Walter's 1913 season top 3 all-time. In fact, I rank that one #1 all-time, so you may as well put my vote in for that one too, if you would please, Bill.
            Red, it took me 16 years to get here. Play me, and you'll get the best I got.

            Comment


            • #21
              Originally posted by torez77
              Guess I should've read the ENTIRE poll before I voted. I just saw "I rank Walter #1 all-time", clicked that one, and submitted my vote. I also rank Walter's 1913 season top 3 all-time. In fact, I rank that one #1 all-time, so you may as well put my vote in for that one too, if you would please, Bill.
              Same here -- I jumped the gun and didnt see the last option -- Put me down for ranking 1913 a top3 all time.

              Comment


              • #22
                Bill, I'd like to see a top ten list for best seasons for the following time periods:

                A. 1900-1919
                B. 1920-1939
                C. 1940-1959
                D. 1960-1979
                E. 1980-2006

                I only ask because I see that your ten best seasons all fall within the deadball eras. I would create my own lists, but I don't have any charts set up yet.
                "Any pitcher who throws at a batter and deliberately tries to hit him is a communist."

                - Alvin Dark

                Comment


                • #23
                  Lefty Grove's peak has to be there somewhere Bill.
                  "I was pitching one day when my glasses clouded up on me. I took them off to polish them. When I looked up to the plate, I saw Jimmie Foxx. The sight of him terrified me so much that I haven't been able to wear glasses since." - Left Gomez

                  "(Lou) Gehrig never learned that a ballplayer couldn't be good every day." - Hank Gowdy

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Originally posted by AstrosFan
                    Bill, I'd like to see a top ten list for best seasons for the following time periods:

                    A. 1900-1919
                    B. 1920-1939
                    C. 1940-1959
                    D. 1960-1979
                    E. 1980-2006

                    I only ask because I see that your ten best seasons all fall within the deadball eras. I would create my own lists, but I don't have any charts set up yet.
                    I don't have another one.

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Originally posted by Myankee4life
                      Lefty Grove's peak has to be there somewhere Bill.
                      Yeah, I'd love to add it if I knew how. Chris the Younger (528280) did those ERA+ peak numbers for me. If anyone knows how to do Grove's peak, 1928-33 ERA+, that would be great, and I'd add it in a heartbeat.

                      Bill
                      Last edited by Bill Burgess; 11-30-2006, 09:02 PM.

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Originally posted by -Kyle-
                        Does anyone, have any idea on how Walter Johnson threw so hard? I mean, it says he never raised his back leg when he threw. How did he get so much power?
                        Kyle - In Baseball Magazine October 1913 they have an oustanding article that tries to answer that very same question. At some point I would like to post that article on the site because it is fascinating stuff.

                        They took measurements of the arm length, arm dimensions, height and weight of all of the top pitchers and tried to make some sense as to why big muscular guys like Jean Duboc were not power pitchers while a lanky, sinewy pitcher like Johnson had tremendous speed.

                        What they found is that Johnson had a reach of 78 1/2 inches. He had one of the largest arm spans of any of the pitchers that they measured - although a couple like Cy Falkenberg had a reach of 79 1/2 inches. Typically you will find that your average man will have a reach equal to his height. So you would expect that Johnson's reach would be about 73 inches.

                        What they also found was that Johnson had the longest arms of anyone that they measured - 34 inches. The 6'5" Falkenberg had an arm length of 33 inches. Carl Weilman was over 6'6" and had a wingspan of "only" 75 inches and an arm length of 31 1/2 inches.

                        Johnson's arm dimensions are as follows: 7 1/8 inch wrist, 12 12/2 inch forearm and 12 1/2 inch biceps.

                        So you had a man with extraordinary long arms and an arm like a whip. If you watch old movies of him pitch, that's exactly what it looks like.

                        There are some great pictures in the article. I am going to send them to Bill and maybe he can post them. They show Johnson showing off his reach. His arms look like a whip.
                        "Batting slumps? I never had one. When a guy hits .358, he doesn't have slumps."

                        Rogers Hornsby, 1961

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Originally posted by Bench 5
                          Kyle - In Baseball Magazine October 1913 they have an oustanding article that tries to answer that very same question. At some point I would like to post that article on the site because it is fascinating stuff.

                          They took measurements of the arm length, arm dimensions, height and weight of all of the top pitchers and tried to make some sense as to why big muscular guys like Jean Duboc were not power pitchers while a lanky, sinewy pitcher like Johnson had tremendous speed.

                          What they found is that Johnson had a reach of 78 1/2 inches. He had one of the largest arm spans of any of the pitchers that they measured - although a couple like Cy Falkenberg had a reach of 79 1/2 inches. Typically you will find that your average man will have a reach equal to his height. So you would expect that Johnson's reach would be about 73 inches.

                          What they also found was that Johnson had the longest arms of anyone that they measured - 34 inches. The 6'5" Falkenberg had an arm length of 33 inches. Carl Weilman was over 6'6" and had a wingspan of "only" 75 inches and an arm length of 31 1/2 inches.

                          Johnson's arm dimensions are as follows: 7 1/8 inch wrist, 12 12/2 inch forearm and 12 1/2 inch biceps.

                          So you had a man with extraordinary long arms and an arm like a whip. If you watch old movies of him pitch, that's exactly what it looks like.

                          There are some great pictures in the article. I am going to send them to Bill and maybe he can post them. They show Johnson showing off his reach. His arms look like a whip.
                          I forget where it's from, but I've read a quote from him talking about how it hurt to watch Joe Wood throw his fastball, that it just seemed like so much more work than Johnson's motion. That easy sidearm motion was a big reason why he was such a workhorse.

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            Originally posted by Bench 5
                            Kyle - In Baseball Magazine October 1913 they have an oustanding article that tries to answer that very same question. At some point I would like to post that article on the site because it is fascinating stuff.

                            They took measurements of the arm length, arm dimensions, height and weight of all of the top pitchers and tried to make some sense as to why big muscular guys like Jean Duboc were not power pitchers while a lanky, sinewy pitcher like Johnson had tremendous speed.

                            What they found is that Johnson had a reach of 78 1/2 inches. He had one of the largest arm spans of any of the pitchers that they measured - although a couple like Cy Falkenberg had a reach of 79 1/2 inches. Typically you will find that your average man will have a reach equal to his height. So you would expect that Johnson's reach would be about 73 inches.

                            What they also found was that Johnson had the longest arms of anyone that they measured - 34 inches. The 6'5" Falkenberg had an arm length of 33 inches. Carl Weilman was over 6'6" and had a wingspan of "only" 75 inches and an arm length of 31 1/2 inches.

                            Johnson's arm dimensions are as follows: 7 1/8 inch wrist, 12 12/2 inch forearm and 12 1/2 inch biceps.

                            So you had a man with extraordinary long arms and an arm like a whip. If you watch old movies of him pitch, that's exactly what it looks like.

                            There are some great pictures in the article. I am going to send them to Bill and maybe he can post them. They show Johnson showing off his reach. His arms look like a whip.
                            Thats some good stuff, thanks.

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Walter Johnson on Ty Cobb:
                              --------------

                              1924 - Replying to the writer's query as to whom he considered the greatest all-around player player in the game, the pitcher said: That is a tough question, but if you insist upon an answer, my selection is Ty Cob. My reasons are several. He is oneof the greatest, probably the greatest batter, that ever lived. He is an excellent fielder and a most dangerous base runner. In fact, he is a star of the highest ranking in every department of the game. But the qualifications that I have already mentioned are not the only measures of Cobb's usefulness. It is the zest, the never-say-die spirit with which he plays that adds to his usefulness to the team. The fight and fire of his enthusiasm of his play are confusing to his opponents and spur his teammates to utmost efforts. In physical and temperamental equipment Ty is unexcelled and these things have put him on a pedestal as a figure that especially appeals to young player. (Washington Post, December 28, 1924, pp. SM4, "Walter Johnson's 20 Years On the Mound", as related to him by Lillian Barker)
                              -----------------------------------------

                              1925 - "In 18 years, I have never had an unfriendly word with Cobb. I consider him one of my best friends. Even when I landed from the wilds of Idaho, a raw and frightened kid, Cobb treated me right. He was always willing to fight to win, but I don't believe Cobb ever picked a fight just for the sake of a row. Leave him alone and treat him right and he is all you expect to find in a well-mannered Southern gentleman. But start something unfair and you'll get a fight--whether you're a ballplayer or a taxicab driver! It didn't take me long to size him up as a hot-headed young fellow who didn't mean half the things he said." (Walter Johnson by Henry W. Thomas, 1995, pp. 145)
                              ------------------------

                              1925 - "Of course Ty Cobb has to be considered. But I don't class Ty with Joe Jackson or Lajoie. So far as natural hitting ability is concerned, they were his superior beyond any reasonable doubt. Where Ty had it on them and where he has it on any batter who ever lived is in amazing speed and tricky head work. He was always doing something, bunting, placing his hits here and there through the infield, slugging when he had to slug. An ordinary roller to short stop was a hit for Ty. If you're talking about great players, Ty is in a class by himself. But when I say that a fellow is a good hitter, I mean that he is naturally a good batter, quite apart from speed of foot, originality and all round head work." (Baseball Magazine, The Greatest Batters I Have Ever Faced, by Walter Johnson, June, 1925, pp. 291, 292, 327, 329; quote appears on pp. 292) (Essential article, discusses Lajoie, Joe Jackson, Speaker, Cobb, Eddie Collins, Frank Baker and of course, Babe Ruth.) I consider this essential reading.
                              ---------------------------------------------

                              1929 - People ask me often if I don't consider Ty Cobb the greatest hitter I ever saw. I certainly don't. He was never in Joe Jackson's class as a natural hitter. A number of other hitters have excelled him in natural ability, in my opinion. There again, people go astray. Ty, like Babe, has honors enough without fastening others on him that do not belong.

                              "Ty was the smartest player that I ever saw by so great a margin that I won't even bother to think who was second best. And that's credit enough. For brains are just as prominent in baseball as in any other profession. Ty was always about three jumps ahead of the crowd. That's what made him such a wonderful star. You could never dope out what he was going to do next. Always, he had you guessing. He had the infield up in the air. He was continually getting the catcher's goat. The outfield couldn't lay for Ty. They never knew where he would drive the ball.

                              There was a time when Ty was sore at me. That was when he was racing Joe Jackson for the Championship. Joe was hitting me much better than Ty. Ty accused me of putting the ball over for Joe. That was foolish, though I guess he was sincere. The fault lay rather in Ty's system and Joe's superior hitting ability. Joe would lay back with that black bat of his and merely slap at my fast ball. He always had a good chance to connect. Ty favored place hitting and beating out bunts. My fast ball, chest high, that had a tendency to jump, was a tough ball to place. It was also a tough ball to bunt. In later years Ty changed his system and had much better results against my pitching. He was too smart and resourceful to be buffaloed very long by any pitching on earth.

                              In sheer batting ability he had superiors. But in dazzling footwork, mechanical skill and lightning quick thinking he never had an equal. Ty has also graduated. He has taken with him most of the records in the American League. He needs no tribute from a "has-been" pitcher who could once bother him in the heyday of his prime. But I'll say of Ty, as I would say of Babe, he was unique." (Baseball Magazine, October, 1929, pp. 487, 488, 517, "The Greatest Players I Ever Saw", by Walter Johnson) (quote apears on pp. 488, 517. Article covers; Waddell, Mathewson, Alexander, Joe Jackson, Ruth, Crawford, Cobb)
                              ----------------------------------------

                              1931 - "Cobb received another first-place vote from Walter Johnson, former great right-handed pitcher and now manager of the Washington Senators. Johnson was lavish in his praise of the "Georgia Peach." He gave Wagner second place and then named Jackson, Ruth and Collins. He had a hard time deciding between Collins and Speaker, with Eddie winning by a shade." (Philadelphia Ledger newspaper, C. William Duncan, late July, 1931) (Survey asked 12 major league managers and coaches, who they thought were the 5 greatest all-around baseball players who ever lived.)
                              ------------------------------------------

                              1942 - "He could do everything better than any player I ever saw. He was always the first one to detect weaknesses or mistakes of the opposition and benefit by the same." (The Sporting News, April 2, 1942, pp. 1 & 13) Greatest Player survey) Sporting News mailed out over 100 letters to former ML stars & managers. It asked, "Who do you consider the greatest ball player of all time" Why?"
                              -----------------------------------------------
                              Walter Johnson/Ty Cobb: 1925

                              Last edited by Bill Burgess; 05-30-2009, 11:13 PM.

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                ---------------------------
                                Last edited by Bill Burgess; 12-04-2006, 07:04 PM.

                                Comment

                                Ad Widget

                                Collapse
                                Working...
                                X