Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Lou Gehrig Thread

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Lou Gehrig Thread

    ----------
    58
    Lou was a Top 10 Position Player.
    68.97%
    40
    Lou was not a Top 10 Position Player.
    13.79%
    8
    Lou was a Top 5 hitter.
    65.52%
    38
    Lou was not a Top 5 hitter.
    12.07%
    7
    Lou was a greater hitter than Rogers Hornsby.
    36.21%
    21
    Hornsby was a greater hitter than Lou Gehrig.
    22.41%
    13
    Lou would have topped 650 homers if not for his disease.
    44.83%
    26
    Lou would not have topped 650 homers if not for his disease.
    29.31%
    17
    Last edited by Bill Burgess; 02-11-2009, 09:38 PM.

  • #2
    The thing about Gehrig is that he was so consistent. From 1927 to 1937 his lowest OPS+ season was 167!

    I always look at Gehrig's 1938 season with a bit of awe. Here's a man whose fighting a terminal illness and he still puts up a 132 OPS+ season. It really goes to show you how talented Gehrig was.
    "I was pitching one day when my glasses clouded up on me. I took them off to polish them. When I looked up to the plate, I saw Jimmie Foxx. The sight of him terrified me so much that I haven't been able to wear glasses since." - Left Gomez

    "(Lou) Gehrig never learned that a ballplayer couldn't be good every day." - Hank Gowdy

    Comment


    • #3
      Excerpt from The Luckiest Man

      Three weeks later, on June 3, the Yankees were in Philadelphia for a game against their principle rival, the Athletics. Gehrig loved hitting in Shibe Park. The fence in right stood only 331 feet away. In left, the distance was 334 feet. But the left field and right field fences converged out by the flagpole at something close to a right angle, which made for a vast canyon in straightaway center field. Over the course of his career, only Yankee Stadium and Sportsman's park in St. Louis were the scene of more Gehrig homers. George "Moose" Earnshaw pitched that day for the Athletics. He had won sixty-seven regular season games and four World Series games the past 3 years, establishing himself as one of the best right handers in the game. But even the best pitchers come out flat occasionally. In the first inning, Gehrig hit a long, two-run homer to left-center field. In the fourth inning, he drove another one over the wall in right. In the bottom half of the same inning, when the Athletics came to bat, he dropped a foul pop. "It was a fairly hard chance, but I should have caught it," he said. The error contributed to a big inning, and Philadelphia took an 8-7 lead.

      In the fifth, Gehrig faced Earnshaw for the third time. "I was still boiling over that error," Gehrig recalled a few years later. He took out his anger on Earnshaw, Cracking yet another homer to left-center. For the fourth time in his career he had hit three home runs in a game. No one else had ever done it more than three times. And the game was only five innings old.

      After Gehrig's third home run, Connie Mack stretched his long legs, climbed out of the dugout, and walked to the mound. He took the ball from Earnshaw and handed it to Leroy Mahaffey, another righty. But Mahaffey had no better luck. In the seventh inning, Gehrig turned on a fastball and thumped it over the left-field fence for his fourth straight homer. Not since the dead-ball era ,when home runs were usually inside-the-park affairs, had anyone hit four in a game. Bob Lowe of the Boston Nationals had done it in 1894, and Ed Delehanty of the Phillies in 1896. No one had ever hit five.

      When Gehrig came to bat in the eighth inning, he had a chance to hit his fifth homer. The small crowd of Philadelphians got on its feet to encourage him. He swung hard but a bit too high, grounding into an easy out.

      The Yankees got six runs in the ninth, bringing their total for the afternoon to twenty, and finally putting the game out of reach. Thanks to the rally, Gehrig got one more turn to hit. Eddie Rommel was on the mound now. Gehrig saw a pitch he liked. He stepped into it, swung, and hit the ball on the thick part of the bat. It felt solid - better than any ball he'd hit all day. At the sound of the crack the fans stood to watch the ball fly. It rose and rose. Gehrig took off running. The ball rocketed toward straightaway center field, into the deepest corner of the park.

      Al Simmons, who'd been switched from left field to center earlier in the game, started sprinting. He could see the ball wasn't going to clear the fence, but he wasn't sure if he would get it in time. If it landed and hit the wall, it might bounce around for awhile. Gehrig would have at least a triple, maybe an inside-the-park home run. Simmons leapt. As he raised his glove and stretched his left arm high above his head, the ball disappeared into the soft leather of his mitt. Gehrig, approaching second base, must have had a good view of the catch. He lowered his head and jogged back to the dugout.

      "You know," he said after the game, "I think that last one was the hardest ball I hit all day. Gosh, it felt good....I wonder what Mom and Pop up at New Rochelle thought of it. Too bad Mom didn't see it."

      -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

      Gehrig becomes the first major leaguer to hit 4 HR's out the park. Almost had a fifth. Like Usual Gehrig style, he had to take a backseat that day. John Mcgraw retired from the Giants that same day.
      Last edited by Myankee4life; 12-17-2006, 12:03 PM.
      "I was pitching one day when my glasses clouded up on me. I took them off to polish them. When I looked up to the plate, I saw Jimmie Foxx. The sight of him terrified me so much that I haven't been able to wear glasses since." - Left Gomez

      "(Lou) Gehrig never learned that a ballplayer couldn't be good every day." - Hank Gowdy

      Comment


      • #4
        1.) Given a healthy decline I'd rank Lou #3 all-time( with my given numbers) and he'd remain the #1 1B

        2.) His BA/OB%/Slg% would have gone down but his counting numbers would of increased.

        Id say not counting his 1938 season ( afflicted with ALS) from 1937 on had he played till he was 40 ( 6 more years)

        He averaged 37 HR's in his career so if he averaged 27 his last 6 years he'd end up with 627HR's (5th all-time).

        He averaged 149 RBI's in his career so if he averaged 119 his last 6 years he'd end up with 2592 (1st all-time).

        He averaged 141 Runs in his career so if he averaged 108 his last 6 years he'd end up with 2418 (1st all-time).

        He averaged 204 Hits in his career so if he averaged 173 his last 6 years hed end up with 3584 (5th all-time).

        He averaged 40 2B in his career so if he averaged 23 his last 6 years hed end up with 640 ( tied 8th all-time).

        He averaged 113 BB in his career so if he averaged 94 his last 6 years hed end up with 1961 (5th all-time).

        So .330/627/2592/.438/.620 3584(H) 2418(R) 640(2B) 1961(BB)
        ---------------------------------------------------------------------

        I posted this on another thread.....This is what I think Gehrig would of done had he played 6 healthy years pass 1937. I think I was too leniant in predicting his numbers.
        "I was pitching one day when my glasses clouded up on me. I took them off to polish them. When I looked up to the plate, I saw Jimmie Foxx. The sight of him terrified me so much that I haven't been able to wear glasses since." - Left Gomez

        "(Lou) Gehrig never learned that a ballplayer couldn't be good every day." - Hank Gowdy

        Comment


        • #5
          Gehrig was a phenomenal hitter, but he never would have been a legend in the game if it wasn't for the way he went out (and still, he's revered in New York at a level far removed from the likes of Ruth, Mantle, DiMaggio, and arguably Berra). Despite being a native New Yorker, he just didn't really have that bigger than life atmosphere about him that we love here... there were never stories about him getting into drunken bar brawls, cheating on his wife with movie stars, and playing World Series games in the midst of three day benders that New Yorkers really like to see from their superstars.
          "Simply put, the passion, interest and tradition surrounding baseball in New York is unmatched."

          Sean McAdam, ESPN.com

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by bkmckenna
            How so? Gehrig was a terror in the box from Day 1. New York had a million newspaper editions a day. He was adored and respected for his abilities - especially by pitchers who look at line drive hitters with extreme caution.

            Legends always grow, especially those cut down while still productive.
            Terror from day one in New York? Perhaps, but there was a time where Lou struggled, in Hartford, from what i've read in his biography.

            Also, on a side note, during one spring training, earlier in his career, he wanted to wait on tables at a local resturant where the team was playing spring training games, however, he turned around the instant he saw his teamates in the resturaunt where he intended to work. He also sent his parents on vacations, putting him in the need for money, earlier in his career. A class act in most aspects, however, he did also have a violent side, he'd get in fights in the clubhouse with opposing team members, and would sometimes have brawls on the field with pitchers who came up and in on him, and sometimes hitting them. This, however, was also earlier in his career.
            Last edited by W_Marone; 12-18-2006, 08:03 PM.

            Comment


            • #7
              2009 World Series Champions, The New York Yankees

              Comment


              • #8
                2009 World Series Champions, The New York Yankees

                Comment


                • #9
                  2009 World Series Champions, The New York Yankees

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Lou Gehrig ready to enter grammar school
                    Attached Files
                    Last edited by Myankee4life; 01-23-2007, 01:46 PM.
                    "I was pitching one day when my glasses clouded up on me. I took them off to polish them. When I looked up to the plate, I saw Jimmie Foxx. The sight of him terrified me so much that I haven't been able to wear glasses since." - Left Gomez

                    "(Lou) Gehrig never learned that a ballplayer couldn't be good every day." - Hank Gowdy

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Luckiest Man: The life and death of Lou Gehrig




                      Lou Gehrig------1917
                      Attached Files
                      "I was pitching one day when my glasses clouded up on me. I took them off to polish them. When I looked up to the plate, I saw Jimmie Foxx. The sight of him terrified me so much that I haven't been able to wear glasses since." - Left Gomez

                      "(Lou) Gehrig never learned that a ballplayer couldn't be good every day." - Hank Gowdy

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by ElHalo
                        Gehrig was a phenomenal hitter, but he never would have been a legend in the game if it wasn't for the way he went out (and still, he's revered in New York at a level far removed from the likes of Ruth, Mantle, DiMaggio, and arguably Berra). Despite being a native New Yorker, he just didn't really have that bigger than life atmosphere about him that we love here... there were never stories about him getting into drunken bar brawls, cheating on his wife with movie stars, and playing World Series games in the midst of three day benders that New Yorkers really like to see from their superstars.
                        Imagine that.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Luckiest Man: The Life and Death of Lou Gehrig




                          At Commerce High, Gehrig (second row, third form the right) was the top slugger on New York city's top high school team. (National Baseball Hall of fame Library, Cooperstown, New York)
                          Attached Files
                          "I was pitching one day when my glasses clouded up on me. I took them off to polish them. When I looked up to the plate, I saw Jimmie Foxx. The sight of him terrified me so much that I haven't been able to wear glasses since." - Left Gomez

                          "(Lou) Gehrig never learned that a ballplayer couldn't be good every day." - Hank Gowdy

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by ElHalo
                            Gehrig was a phenomenal hitter, but he never would have been a legend in the game if it wasn't for the way he went out (and still, he's revered in New York at a level far removed from the likes of Ruth, Mantle, DiMaggio, and arguably Berra). Despite being a native New Yorker, he just didn't really have that bigger than life atmosphere about him that we love here... there were never stories about him getting into drunken bar brawls, cheating on his wife with movie stars, and playing World Series games in the midst of three day benders that New Yorkers really like to see from their superstars.
                            Willie Mays say hi. :
                            Strikeouts are boring! Besides that, they're fascist. Throw some ground balls - it's more democratic.-Crash Davis

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Lou Gehrig, 1931


                              May 31, 1938, 2000 consecutive game


                              May 6, 1929

                              Last edited by Bill Burgess; 06-01-2009, 09:42 AM.

                              Comment

                              Ad Widget

                              Collapse
                              Working...
                              X