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  • #31
    Ted as a Manager

    Code:
     Year    League   Team     Age  G     W    L    WP   Finish
    +----+-----------+--------+---+-----+----+----+------+------+
     1969 AL East     Washngtn  50   162   86   76   .531      4
     1970 AL East     Washngtn  51   162   70   92   .432      6
     1971 AL East     Washngtn  52   159   63   96   .396      5
     1972 AL West     Texas     53   154   54  100   .351      6
    +----+-----------+--------+---+-----+----+----+------+------+
          TOTAL                      637  273  364   .429
    ------------------------------------------------------------------

    Was Williams a Good Manager?

    In a hitting aspect, yes. We see by the numbers of the Washington/Texas teams before and when he began to manage, the players got much better when it came to hitting.
    Code:
    Club Batting--1967---------1968-------1969 (Williams' first year)
                       .223----------.224-------.251
    
    Individual Batting---1967------1968----1969
    B. Allen------------.193-------.241----.247
    H. Allen------------.233-------.219----.277
    Brinkman-----------.188-------.187----.278
    Epstien-------------.226------.234-----.278
    Howard-------------.256------.274-----.298
    McMullen-----------.245------.248------.272
    Stroud-------------.212------.239------.252
    Unser--------------.251------.230------.286
    Versalles-----------.200------.196------.236
    We see that Williams made many hitters, and really the whole club, better hitters in his first year and most of his managerial career. You also have to give Williams credit considering the fact that Ted had to deal with, in simplest terms, some of the worst ballplayers of there eras.
    "He studied hitting like a broker studies the stock market, how a scribe studies the scriptures" - Carl Yastrzemski on Ted Williams

    "The greatest clutch hitter in Red Sox history has done it again! Big Papi!" - Don Orsillo's call of Ortiz's walk-off single

    Comment


    • #32
      Williams' % of League BA

      A shameless rip of Bill's Ty Cobb calculation. I have calculated Ted Williams' % of his league's BA on a year to year base. We see Mr. Williams greatly outhit the league in everyone of his full seasons, as did all great hitters, and hit had an average of about 130%.

      1939 - 117%
      1940 - 126%
      1941 - 152%
      1942 - 119%
      1946 - 133%
      1947 - 133%
      1948 - 138%
      1949 - 130%
      1950 - 116%
      1954 - 134%
      1955 - 137%
      1956 - 132%
      1957 - 151%
      1958 - 129%
      1959 - 147%
      1960 - 123%
      Last edited by The Kid; 04-17-2007, 05:45 PM.
      "He studied hitting like a broker studies the stock market, how a scribe studies the scriptures" - Carl Yastrzemski on Ted Williams

      "The greatest clutch hitter in Red Sox history has done it again! Big Papi!" - Don Orsillo's call of Ortiz's walk-off single

      Comment


      • #33
        Williams' Speed Case

        Something I have always found to be underrated about Ted Williams is his speed. Here I will attempt to make a speed case for Williams.

        Times Finished in Top Ten Triples

        1939 - 5th
        1940 - 4th
        1946 - 8th
        1947 - 7th
        "He studied hitting like a broker studies the stock market, how a scribe studies the scriptures" - Carl Yastrzemski on Ted Williams

        "The greatest clutch hitter in Red Sox history has done it again! Big Papi!" - Don Orsillo's call of Ortiz's walk-off single

        Comment


        • #34
          Ted's HOF Induction Speech


          "I guess every player thinks about going into the Hall of Fame. Now that the moment has come for me I find it difficult to say what is really in my heart. But I know it is the greatest thrill of my life. I received two hundred and eighty-odd votes from the writers. I know I didn't have two hundred and eighty-odd friends among the writers. I know they voted for me because they felt in their minds and in their hearts that I rated it, and I want to say to them: Thank you, from the bottom of my heart.

          Today I am thinking about a lot of things. I am thinking about my playground director in San Diego, Rodney Luscomb, my high school coach, Wos Caldwell, and my managers, who had so much patience with me--fellows like Frank Shellenback, Donie Bush, Joe Cronin, and Joe McCarthy. I am thinking of Eddie Collins, who had so much faith in me--and to be in the Hall with him particularly, as well as those other great players, is a great honor. I'm sorry Eddie isn't here today.

          I'm thinking of Tom Yawkey. I have always said it: Tom Yawkey is the greatest owner in baseball. I was lucky to have played on the club he owned, and I'm grateful to him for being here today.

          But I'd not be leveling if I left it at that. Ballplayers are not born great. They're not born great hitters or pitchers or managers, and luck isn't a big factor. No one has come up with a substitute for hard work. I've never met a great player who didn't have to work harder at learning to play ball than anything else he ever did. To me it was the greatest fun I ever had, which probably explains why today I feel both humility and pride, because God let me play the game and learn to be good at it.

          The other day Willie Mays hit his five hundred and twenty-second homerun. He has gone past me, and he's pushing, and I say to him, 'go get 'em Willie.'

          Baseball gives every American boy a chance to excel. Not just to be as good as anybody else, but to be better. This is the nature of man and the name of the game. I hope some day Satchel Paige and Josh Gibson will be voted into the Hall of Fame as symbols of the great Negro players who are not here only because they weren't given the chance.

          As time goes on I'll be thinking baseball, teaching baseball, and arguing for baseball to keep it right on top of American sports, just as it is in Japan, Mexico, Venezuela, and other Latin American and South American countries. I know Casey feels the same way. . . . I also know I'll lose a dear friend if I don't stop talking. I'm eating into his time, and that is unforgivable. So in closing, I am greatful and know how lucky I was to have been born an American and had the chance to play the game I love, the greatest game."
          "He studied hitting like a broker studies the stock market, how a scribe studies the scriptures" - Carl Yastrzemski on Ted Williams

          "The greatest clutch hitter in Red Sox history has done it again! Big Papi!" - Don Orsillo's call of Ortiz's walk-off single

          Comment


          • #35
            In the power department, Ted was pretty damn good but nobody comes close to matching Ruth. You could look at the enormous gap in SA, which would increase by 10 points if you just count Babe's '18-'35, when he wasn't a full-time pitcher. That's completely fair and would be .700 to .634. What I found interesting though, was something Jenkinson wrote in his new book. We know about Ted's blast that went 33 rows deep up into the right field stands. They painted a seat or something for that one, pretty impressive. On May 25, 1926, Ruth hit a ball into the 45th row of that same 50 row section, which is twelve rows or a thirty foot difference. Babe launched at least five other balls, all except one (in 1918) coming as a visiting player, that matched or exceeded that 33 row marker. Ted was amazing, but for power he too must take a back seat.

            Comment


            • #36
              Matt Souder's Offensive PCA for Williams and other Great Hitters


              Code:
              Career PCA-BA With at Least 5000 PA - Top 50
              PlayerID	SumOfPA	 PCA-BA
              Ruth	  10617	 0.385
              Williams	  9791	 0.381
              Bonds	  11584	 0.369
              Mantle	  9909	 0.360
              Cobb	  13072	 0.356
              Hornsby	  9475	 0.354
              Thomas	  8478	 0.352
              Gehrig	  9660	 0.351
              Wagner	  11739	 0.343
              Hamilton	  7584	 0.342
              Jackson	  5690	 0.341
              Henderson 13346	 0.341
              Brouthers	  7653	 0.341
              Musial	  12712	 0.340
              Ott 	  11333	 0.340
              McGwire	  7660	 0.340
              Mize	  7371	 0.338
              Mays	  12493	 0.336
              Greenberg  6095	 0.336
              Giambi	  5784	 0.335
              Allen	   7314	 0.334
              Speaker	 11988	 0.334
              Browning	 5312	 0.333
              Dimaggio	 7671	 0.333
              Foxx	 9670	 0.333
              Delahanty 8389	 0.331
              Aaron	 13940	 0.330
              Chance	 5099	 0.330
              Robinson	 11743	 0.328
              Collins	 12035	 0.328
              Morgan	 11329	 0.327
              Ramirez	 6575	 0.325
              Kiner	 6256	 0.325
              Stovey	 6832	 0.325
              Walker	 7663	 0.324
              Heilmann	 8960	 0.324
              Flick	 6414	 0.324
              Martinez 	 8672	 0.324
              Rodriguez	 6385	 0.324
              Thome	 7039	 0.324
              Sheffield	 8719	 0.322
              Lajoie	10456	 0.322
              Connor	 8837	 0.322
              Matthews 10101	 0.321
              Delgado	 6016	 0.321
              Shcmidt	 10062	 0.321
              McCovey	 9686	 0.320
              Stargell	 9026	 0.320
              Bagwell	 9308	 0.319
              Magee	8546	0.318
              
              Career Offensive Wins - Top 50
              First	Last    	Ps	Offensive Wins
              Ty	Cobb    	CF	265.20
              Babe	Ruth    	RF	264.52
              Barry	Bonds   	LF	258.57
              Ted	Williams	LF	238.52
              Rickey	Henderson	LF	237.42
              Stan	Musial  	LF	224.91
              Hank	Aaron   	RF	222.69
              Willie	Mays    	CF	213.52
              Honus	Wagner  	SS	213.05
              Mickey	Mantle  	CF	207.43
              Tris	Speaker 	CF	200.48
              Mel	Ott     	RF	199.65
              Eddie	Collins 	2B	189.73
              Rogers	Hornsby 	2B	188.69
              Lou	Gehrig  	1B	187.89
              Frank	Robinson	RF	184.72
              Joe	Morgan  	2B	175.97
              Frank	Thomas  	1B	165.60
              Carl	Yastrzemski	LF	164.91
              Jimmie	Foxx    	1B	160.04
              Reggie	Jackson 	RF	156.24
              Nap	Lajoie  	2B	154.22
              Pete	Rose    	LF	153.56
              George	Brett   	3B	153.09
              Paul	Molitor 	3B	151.87
              Eddie	Murray  	1B	148.92
              Eddie	Mathews 	3B	147.42
              Al	Kaline  	RF	147.22
              Mike	Schmidt 	3B	146.65
              Rafael	Palmeiro	1B	143.52
              Rod	Carew   	2B	143.45
              Willie	McCovey 	1B	139.85
              Billy	Hamilton	CF	137.05
              Dan	Brouthers	1B	136.68
              Wade	Boggs   	3B	136.49
              Ed	Delahanty	LF	135.86
              Tim	Raines  	LF	135.65
              Paul	Waner   	RF	135.57
              Mark	McGwire 	1B	135.11
              Harry	Heilmann	RF	134.33
              Dave	Winfield	RF	133.72
              Jeff	Bagwell 	1B	133.15
              Sam	Crawford	RF	132.45
              Harmon	Killebrew	1B	131.81
              Edgar	Martinez	3B	130.84
              Jesse	Burkett 	LF	130.24
              Roger	Connor  	1B	129.92
              Willie	Stargell	LF	129.78
              Robin	Yount   	SS	129.02
              Johnny	Mize    	1B	128.31
              
              Offensive Greatness Index Leaders - Top 50
              First	Last    	Ps	Of-Rk	GI
              Babe	Ruth    	RF	1	770.18
              Barry	Bonds   	LF	2	723.45
              Ty	Cobb    	CF	3	712.03
              Ted	Williams	LF	4	700.31
              Rickey	Henderson	LF	5	627.82
              Mickey	Mantle  	CF	6	594.89
              Honus	Wagner  	SS	7	587.68
              Stan	Musial  	LF	8	576.80
              Rogers	Hornsby 	2B	9	551.97
              Willie	Mays    	CF	10	540.86
              Hank	Aaron   	RF	11	536.57
              Lou	Gehrig  	1B	12	533.69
              Mel	Ott     	RF	13	521.25
              Tris	Speaker 	CF	14	517.40
              Frank	Thomas  	1B	15	500.37
              Eddie	Collins 	2B	16	481.14
              Joe	Morgan  	2B	17	469.61
              Frank	Robinson	RF	18	468.80
              Jimmie	Foxx    	1B	19	452.55
              Mark	McGwire  	1B	20	431.66
              Nap	Lajoie  	2B	21	424.64
              Billy	Hamilton	CF	22	422.21
              Ed	Delahanty	LF	23	415.69
              Dan	Brouthers	1B	24	411.20
              Reggie	Jackson 	RF	25	410.48
              Mike	Piazza  	C	26	405.78
              Eddie	Mathews 	3B	27	401.14
              George	Brett   	3B	28	399.35
              Willie	McCovey  	1B	29	393.72
              Carl	Yastrzemski	LF	30	393.16
              Johnny	Mize    	1B	31	393.05
              Mike	Schmidt 	3B	32	392.24
              Rod	Carew   	2B	33	388.25
              Joe	DiMaggio	CF	34	384.95
              Dick	Allen   	1B	35	382.65
              Harry	Heilmann	RF	36	380.81
              Paul	Molitor 	3B	37	380.75
              Edgar	Martinez	3B	38	380.41
              Willie	Stargell	LF	39	369.10
              Carlton	Fisk    	C	40	369.00
              Roger	Connor  	1B	41	368.61
              Al	Kaline  	RF	42	368.10
              Gary	Sheffield	RF	43	367.16
              Jeff	Bagwell 	1B	44	365.45
              Wade	Boggs   	3B	45	364.45
              Eddie	Murray  	1B	46	362.34
              Tim	Raines  	LF	47	360.24
              Larry	Walker  	RF	48	358.90
              Rafael	Palmeiro	1B	49	355.56
              Harmon	Killebrew	1B	50	354.68
              "He studied hitting like a broker studies the stock market, how a scribe studies the scriptures" - Carl Yastrzemski on Ted Williams

              "The greatest clutch hitter in Red Sox history has done it again! Big Papi!" - Don Orsillo's call of Ortiz's walk-off single

              Comment


              • #37
                Originally posted by Sultan_1895-1948 View Post
                In the power department, Ted was pretty damn good but nobody comes close to matching Ruth. You could look at the enormous gap in SA, which would increase by 10 points if you just count Babe's '18-'35, when he wasn't a full-time pitcher. That's completely fair and would be .700 to .634. What I found interesting though, was something Jenkinson wrote in his new book. We know about Ted's blast that went 33 rows deep up into the right field stands. They painted a seat or something for that one, pretty impressive. On May 25, 1926, Ruth hit a ball into the 45th row of that same 50 row section, which is twelve rows or a thirty foot difference. Babe launched at least five other balls, all except one (in 1918) coming as a visiting player, that matched or exceeded that 33 row marker. Ted was amazing, but for power he too must take a back seat.
                Ruth's power was unique in this respect. If you look at the all-time slugging list you have a five guys in the .605-.634 range then this huge gap. Even Sadaharu Oh with all his HRs and walks, nine .700+ slugging seasons, and playing in a lesser league only slugged .634 for his career.
                Strikeouts are boring! Besides that, they're fascist. Throw some ground balls - it's more democratic.-Crash Davis

                Comment


                • #38
                  Did Williams speak Spanish?
                  Strikeouts are boring! Besides that, they're fascist. Throw some ground balls - it's more democratic.-Crash Davis

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    Ted Williams takes the mound. August 24, 1940.Ted comes in from left field to pitch the 8th inning. The Tigers were leading the Bosox 11-1.

                    Pitched two innings, three hits and one walk. Ted did fan Tiger slugger Rudy York on three pitches. York had already batted in 5 runs with two singles, a double and a home run.

                    The catcher was Joe Glenn. Joe was the catcher for Babe Ruth when he pitched his last game. Bragging rights for Joe, he could claim he caught for two of the games greatest hitters.
                    Last edited by leecemark; 08-11-2007, 07:34 AM.

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      Ted/Joe, 1941, Fenway Park.
                      Attached Files
                      Last edited by Bill Burgess; 08-11-2007, 11:12 AM.

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        Originally posted by Honus Wagner Rules View Post
                        Did Williams speak Spanish?

                        No. From what I have researched, I do not believe Williams ever had any latino friends, players or otherwise.
                        "He studied hitting like a broker studies the stock market, how a scribe studies the scriptures" - Carl Yastrzemski on Ted Williams

                        "The greatest clutch hitter in Red Sox history has done it again! Big Papi!" - Don Orsillo's call of Ortiz's walk-off single

                        Comment


                        • #42
                          Originally posted by will[email protected]
                          This may be true, to the best of our knowledge, but how do we know if players hid their heritage, like Ted.

                          How many fans realized that Ted was half-Mexican? Few, I'd imagine. I wonder if others of Mexican, Jewish, or black heritage masked their lineage, due to it not being politically expediant to make their nationalities common knowledge. Know what I mean? But Ted was definitely the first Latino superstar. I don't think Dolf Luque qualifies for stardom status. And Luis Tiant, Camilo Pascual, Luis Aparicio came much later than Ted did.
                          You're absolutely right, Bill. First generation guys in his day often hid or even rejected their parents heritage. Williams' father had an almost mysterious background, but was predominantly out of the picture - popping up now and then, here and there. And his Mom, as we all know, was a real bellringer. It all embarrassed him terribly. He lived in a denial of sorts, I think, focusing on baseball (read: hitting) to the exclusion of virtually all else.

                          When I visited his childhood home in North Park and spoke with the old-timers still there (in the Eighties), I asked whether he spoke Spanish. All of them answered no, as if that was something they'd never even given any thought. I also got the impression that his Mom (who was nicknamed in the neighborhood 'the Angel of Tiajuana - the way many San Diegans liked to spell it then) was fluent in English, though I don't know that for sure.

                          All of us have our difficult circumstances, but he overcame his more than most - until that nutjob kid of his ("John Henry" - the horse's ass) lost his mind (read: head). Ted was already immortal. He didn't need no stinkin' cryogenic lab - in the desert, no less - to make it so.

                          Long Live Teddy, one of the three greatest hitters that ever lived.
                          Last edited by TRfromBR; 05-04-2007, 07:07 PM.

                          Comment


                          • #43
                            Does anyone have a scouting report on Williams? A spray chart? Splits? Or what pitches he was weak or strong against? I'm dying to know what pitchers did the 51% of the time they managed to get him out...must have been something special.
                            "he probably used some performance enhancing drugs so he could do a better job on his report...i hear they make you gain weight" - Dr. Zizmor

                            "I thought it was interesting and yes a conversation piece. Next time I post a similar story I will close with the question "So, do you think either of them have used steroids?" so that I can make the topic truly relevant to discussions about today's game." - Eric Davis

                            http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gqul1GyK7-g

                            Comment


                            • #44
                              Quite a contrast in physique here, Foxx and Williams. Don't think on average he hit as many long ones as Jimmie did but Ted hit some very long home runs. Going though some news archives, game recaps in his first season he hit a good number in the 430 foot and a few that were 450+ feet.
                              Last edited by leecemark; 08-11-2007, 07:34 AM.

                              Comment


                              • #45
                                William's Year by Year Win Shares (Presented by Bill James)

                                1939 - 32
                                1940 - 30
                                1941 - 42
                                1942 - 46
                                1943 - 49
                                1946 - 44
                                1947 - 39
                                1948 - 39
                                1949 - 40
                                1950 - 19
                                1951 - 34
                                1952 - 1
                                1953 - 9
                                1954 - 29
                                1955 - 24
                                1956 - 25
                                1957 - 38
                                1958 - 25
                                1959 - 9
                                1960 - 2
                                Last edited by The Kid; 05-13-2007, 11:10 AM.
                                "He studied hitting like a broker studies the stock market, how a scribe studies the scriptures" - Carl Yastrzemski on Ted Williams

                                "The greatest clutch hitter in Red Sox history has done it again! Big Papi!" - Don Orsillo's call of Ortiz's walk-off single

                                Comment

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