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Best Outfield Arm Ever:

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  • #61
    lol nice. Yeah, easy as that huh.

    Any thoughts on Jay Buhner's arm? Very strong, but how accurate?
    "By common consent, Ruth was the hardest hitter of history; a fine fielder, if not a finished one; an inspired base runner, seeming to do the right thing without thinking. He had the most perfect co-ordination of any human animal I ever knew." - Hugh Fullerton, 1936 (Chicago sports writer, 1893-1930's)

    ROY / ERA+ Title / Cy Young / WS MVP / HR Title / Gold Glove / Comeback POY / BA Title / MVP / All Star / HOF

    Comment


    • #62
      Originally posted by 538280
      Ruth did have a very good arm when younger I know, but from what I've read he lost that ability real quick. There's no way he had a better arm than guys like Hooper, Parker, and Winfield. Even if his arm was just as good or better than those guys for a few years, he didn't stay there.
      I never read where Babe lost his arm. Here is a reference by Joe Sewell, who played SS for the Yankees, 1931-33.

      Author Paul Green: You played on the Yankees with Babe Ruth.
      Sewell: Now, Babe Ruth in my estimation was the greatest thrower. He had a good strong arm and was the greatest throwing outfielder that I ever played with.

      Comment


      • #63
        I'm gonna try a nuanced appraisal of Babe's arm. I think he had an all time arm, and never lost it, but not for the long ones to home. Joe Sewell tells of Babe never being off-line in his throws from RF to 2nd. Always came in hard, on one bounce, and Joe was taking those throws from 1931-33.

        But Paul Krichell, the Yankees' famous scout from 1920-1957, wrote this:

        "Ignored all training rules. No good on long throws. Liked too well to take things easy." (Sporting News, April 23, 1952, pp. 2, column 3)

        Only criticism I ever heard on Babe's throwing.

        Comment


        • #64
          Last game of the '33 season at 39 years old, Babe pitched against the Red Sox. He'd only pitched once in the previous 12 years, but went the distance against Boston, allowing 12 hits (11 of them singles), and hit his own homer in that game (#34). Yanks won 6-5.
          "By common consent, Ruth was the hardest hitter of history; a fine fielder, if not a finished one; an inspired base runner, seeming to do the right thing without thinking. He had the most perfect co-ordination of any human animal I ever knew." - Hugh Fullerton, 1936 (Chicago sports writer, 1893-1930's)

          ROY / ERA+ Title / Cy Young / WS MVP / HR Title / Gold Glove / Comeback POY / BA Title / MVP / All Star / HOF

          Comment


          • #65
            nobody runs on Matt Stairs.....

            Comment


            • #66
              Are there players who did not make it to being regulars, due to lack of hitting skills, but could throw with the best ? Recently I think of Jose Guillen, before he made it with the Angels and Nats. Feedback, please

              Comment


              • #67
                Originally posted by FatAngel
                Are there players who did not make it to being regulars, due to lack of hitting skills, but could throw with the best ? Recently I think of Jose Guillen, before he made it with the Angels and Nats. Feedback, please
                Guillen did make one throw that stands out. Must have been one of his first two years, in a road game at Shea I think?. The throw from literally the wall in right all the way home on a line. Or somethin' like that, maybe it was someone else.
                "By common consent, Ruth was the hardest hitter of history; a fine fielder, if not a finished one; an inspired base runner, seeming to do the right thing without thinking. He had the most perfect co-ordination of any human animal I ever knew." - Hugh Fullerton, 1936 (Chicago sports writer, 1893-1930's)

                ROY / ERA+ Title / Cy Young / WS MVP / HR Title / Gold Glove / Comeback POY / BA Title / MVP / All Star / HOF

                Comment


                • #68
                  Originally posted by Sultan_1895-1948
                  lol nice. Yeah, easy as that huh.

                  Any thoughts on Jay Buhner's arm? Very strong, but how accurate?
                  Not bad, he only won 1 GG, in 1996, and could be a case made that he deserved it in '97 (and POSSIBLY in '92). So he was good, but overall, not great.

                  Comment


                  • #69
                    Originally posted by Edgartohof
                    Not bad, he only won 1 GG, in 1996, and could be a case made that he deserved it in '97 (and POSSIBLY in '92). So he was good, but overall, not great.
                    This is just about arm though. And gold gloves are bogus anyway imo. They're won as much on reputation as what you actually did that year.
                    "By common consent, Ruth was the hardest hitter of history; a fine fielder, if not a finished one; an inspired base runner, seeming to do the right thing without thinking. He had the most perfect co-ordination of any human animal I ever knew." - Hugh Fullerton, 1936 (Chicago sports writer, 1893-1930's)

                    ROY / ERA+ Title / Cy Young / WS MVP / HR Title / Gold Glove / Comeback POY / BA Title / MVP / All Star / HOF

                    Comment


                    • #70
                      Originally posted by Sultan_1895-1948
                      Agreed. Never in terms of the expected level of screwups, mistakes, brainfarts, whoopsies, or boneheaded blunders. He was known to "never" throw to the wrong base.

                      It's easy to overlook Babe's great arm and fielding instincts when he gained weight later on and lost a few steps, and when his offense overshadowed every other part of his game by such a huge margin. Those who played with him and against him understood what an all around player he was. I think Cobb was a better fielder than most give him credit for, and his peers back this up, but it really doesn't matter because his hitting and baserunning steal the show. Albert Pujols day in and day out is a very smart baserunner who rarely hesitates, and makes textbook decisions. Yet he's not fast, so this gets overlooked and his amazing hitting is payed attention to. Human nature I guess. These guys at the top of the list threw very well. It was what they did and it's what got focused on because for the most part it was their main skill. It's not so far fetched to believe that others have had nearly as good arms, but also possessed other great tools. We just need to pay attention to ALL the tools instead of being clouded by the main one/ones.
                      Sultan...are you ever going to post anything that isn't trying to pump up the Babe? His arm may well have been good...even great, but not on a level with the others on these lists. It just ain't true.

                      Comment


                      • #71
                        Other than what I read, I have no clue about Ruth, Jackson, Cobb, Speaker and a few others mentioned here. One of my grandfathers would tell you that Al Simmons had a solid arm and never gets the credit defensively that he should.

                        Among those I have seen, it would be difficult to pick a #1...but if I had to, it would probably be Dwight Evans. Yes, over Roberto Clemente.

                        Jesse Barfield, Dave Parker, Ichiro Suzuki, Garry Maddox and Terry Puhl would also be on the list somewhere. Another active name not mentioned yet is Richard Hidalgo who has a strong arm. And if you ask Cubs fans about Willy Taveras, they will tell you not to be so anxious to have your favorite players try and take an extra base on him.
                        Never confuse character with geography --- Red Smith
                        Astros Daily

                        Comment


                        • #72
                          [QUOTE=yanks0714]

                          Roger Maris did have a good arm but not on that day in 1962 he didn't. The Giants were not aware of it.

                          Maris had a sore shoulder which the Yankees kept quiet. To compensate, 2B Bobby Richardson was going out further into RF to take Roger's throws.

                          In addition, prior to that game the San Francisco area had a great deal of rain. The outfield was soaked. May's hit to RF was slowed down drastically by the wet ground, allowing Maris to get over and cut it off before it got into the corner. Richardson came well out onto the OF grass to take the throw from Roger and wheeled to throw home. But Matty was held at 3B.

                          I've often felt that the Giants should have sent Alou home. He was fast, Richardson would have had to make a longer than usual relay and would have had to be perfect on the throw to nail Alou.

                          Roger did a good job but was helped considerably by wet ground and Richardson covering for his sore shoulder.

                          That half inning is still the most exciting inning of baseball I have ever witnessed in my life.
                          I'm sure that thought went through the minds of the Giants at the time and certainly after the game and WS was over, should have sent Alou home. But thats part of the game, going on the reputation that Maris had for that great arm. I remember watching a Saturday afternoon game, White Sox Yankees late innings and I believe the runner on third base for the sox was Nellie Fox. A fly ball hit to medium to deep to Maris in right. Fox bluffs a tag and Maris holds him with a perfect throw. Next batter almost an instant replay, another ball hit to Maris same spot. This time Fox does not bluff, he's going and again Maris makes a perfect throw to the plate, Fox is out.

                          I'm sure the white Sox were thinking what I thought after that play. OK, Maris great arm but what are the odds that he can make two great perfect throws in one inning back to back, sure it's possible but then again he may be even a bit off, Maris was not, he was perfect on that day.

                          Getting back to that half inning Giants Yanks, that was some tension. As a Yankee fan my heart stopped when McCovey hit that laser beam to Richardson. A fraction to the left or right of Bobby and it's a base hit, that ball was hit as hard as any I've ever seen. Willie was a scary guy in the batter's box.
                          Last edited by SHOELESSJOE3; 01-29-2006, 07:07 AM.

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                          • #73
                            Originally posted by yanks0714
                            I need to clarify something here. When Vic Wertz hit that shot that Willie Mays turned into the 'The Catch and The Throw', there were two runners on base. Larry Doby was on 2B and Al Rosen was on 1B.

                            Doby did, in fact, advance on the play. Rosen had to hustle back to 1B to avoid being doubled up. The feeling was that with the ball hit so deep in the Polo Grounds, Mays' momentum carrying him even further, the turn and throw, and with Doby having good speed he may well have advanced TWo bases. Willie's throw held Rosen at 1B thereby preserving a pitchers best friend, the force play.
                            Is there no justice in this game. Vic Wertz hits a ball 430-440 feet plus and becomes part of an all time WS highlight, on the short end. Dusty Rhodes hits a game winning home run, less than 300 feet, the hero.

                            BTW, in the first inning Wertz did triple off that short wall in right. Wertz also singled to left in the 4th...singled to right in the 6th and doubled to left center in the 10th, but who remembers all that.
                            Last edited by Bill Burgess; 01-29-2006, 02:53 PM.

                            Comment


                            • #74
                              Originally posted by SHOELESSJOE3
                              Is there no justice in this game. Vic Wertz hits a ball 430-440 feet plus and becomes part of an all time WS highlight, on the short end. Dusty Rhodes hits a game winning home run, less than 300 feet, the hero.

                              BTW, in the first inning Wertz did triple off that short wall in right. Wertz also singled to left in the 4th...singled to right in the 6th and doubled to left center in the 10th, but who remembers all that.
                              That's baseball. Wertz goes 4-5 with a triple, a double, and two singles and ALL he's remembered for in that game is the out he made!

                              Rhodes hits a pop fly that barely falls into the seats, the RF leaped at the fence thinking he could get it, and becomes a hero.

                              Amazing.

                              Yankees Fan Since 1957

                              Comment


                              • #75
                                [QUOTE=yanks0714]
                                Roger Maris did have a good arm but not on that day in 1962 he didn't. The Giants were not aware of it.

                                Maris had a sore shoulder which the Yankees kept quiet. To compensate, 2B Bobby Richardson was going out further into RF to take Roger's throws.

                                In addition, prior to that game the San Francisco area had a great deal of rain. The outfield was soaked. May's hit to RF was slowed down drastically by the wet ground, allowing Maris to get over and cut it off before it got into the corner. Richardson came well out onto the OF grass to take the throw from Roger and wheeled to throw home. But Matty was held at 3B.

                                I've often felt that the Giants should have sent Alou home. He was fast, Richardson would have had to make a longer than usual relay and would have had to be perfect on the throw to nail Alou.

                                Roger did a good job but was helped considerably by wet ground and Richardson covering for his sore shoulder.

                                That half inning is still the most exciting inning of baseball I have ever witnessed in my life.
                                Originally posted by SHOELESSJOE3
                                I'm sure that thought went through the minds of the Giants at the time and certainly after the game and WS was over, should have sent Alou home. But thats part of the game, going on the reputation that Maris had for that great arm. I remember watching a Saturday afternoon game, White Sox Yankees late innings and I believe the runner on third base for the sox was Nellie Fox. A fly ball hit to medium to deep to Maris in right. Fox bluffs a tag and Maris holds him with a perfect throw. Next batter almost an instant replay, another ball hit to Maris same spot. This time Fox does not bluff, he's going and again Maris makes a perfect throw to the plate, Fox is out.

                                I'm sure the white Sox were thinking what I thought after that play. OK, Maris great arm but what are the odds that he can make two great perfect throws in one inning back to back, sure it's possible but then again he may be even a bit off, Maris was not, he was perfect on that day.

                                Getting back to that half inning Giants Yanks, that was some tension. As a Yankee fan my heart stopped when McCovey hit that laser beam to Richardson. A fraction to the left or right of Bobby and it's a base hit, that ball was hit as hard as any I've ever seen. Willie was a scary guy in the batter's box.
                                There is no doubt Roger Maris had a great arm. Strong and accurate. I agree that the White Sox figured he couldn't make two perfect throws in a row. Wrong.

                                BTW, my heart never had a chance to stop whem McCovey hit that shot, it happened so quick. Many think Richardson made a great catch. Nah, he had to catch it, at chest level no less, or the drive may have killed him.
                                The odd thing about that whole situation was that Alvin Dark, the Giants, Manager, wasted two outs trying to move Alou to 2B. Felipe Alou, the batter after Matty, says that failing to get the bunt down was the worse thing that happened to him. THEN, Dark tries to have Chuck Hiller, the next batter try to bunt as well! Of course with Willie Mays up next maybe that strategy would have worked, as Willie doubled to right.
                                The Yanks didn't want to face Orlando Cepeda who was up after McCovey. Cepeda was already the 'Baby Bull' and a certified slugging star. They figured they could get a young inexpereienced player like McCovey to go after something out of the strike zone. If they walked him, well, then they'd have the force play at 2B. BUT they didn't want to pitche to Cepeda.
                                Ralph Houk admitted years later that he had brain lock and didn't know what to do. It was Terry, the pitcher, who suggested they feed McCovery pitches out of the strike zone.
                                Last edited by yanks0714; 01-29-2006, 07:58 AM.

                                Yankees Fan Since 1957

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