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Most feared 1-2 punches in history.

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  • #46
    Bushrod,

    It's cool to ramble. Some of the best stuff comes out of random meanderings.

    Not all who wander are lost.

    Bill Burgess

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    • #47
      Bushrod, Jensen retired because of a fear of flying. He tried to stick to trains when the team switched to flying, but with moves and expansion to the further reaches of the country, he couldn't make it work anymore.

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      • #48
        Jensen retired, stayed out one season, came back for one season, and had a decent year. Then retired for good.I guess flying didn't become any easier.
        Lets get Eddie Basinski elected to the Polish Sports Hall of Fame.
        www.brooklyndodgermemories.com

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        • #49
          fear of flying

          that's right. what a hell of a way to lose your career! has anyone else had to quit due to fear of flying? Mickey Mantle said he had a panic attack on a plane, but i think it was after he retired. Poor Mick! To be so famous that everyone is looking at you or wanting to, and then to panic with them all watching, and in a plane. they ought to keep knockout drops for cases like that. have mercy.

          let me sleep through this.

          anyone know what became of Jensen?
          Why you do this to me, Dimi?

          Comment


          • #50
            Hi Bushrod,

            So nice to chat with you again. Thanks for the great question. The Baseball Necrology by Bill Lee, 2003, pp. 199, gives this excerpted entry for Jackie Jensen's post baseball career.

            "He coached baseball at the University of Nevada and the University of California before moving to Virginia in 1977 to operate a Christmas tree farm and run a baseball camp. Died from a heart attack. Buried Amherst Cemetery, Amherst VA."

            Good question.

            Bill Burgess

            Comment


            • #51
              Thanks Bill

              Man, Jensen had a hard life for a guy who made All-America in football and major leagues in baseball. there should be an ESPN Classic biography of Jackie Jensen. I think when he first started, he was actually out-hitting Mantle. Ted Williams probably said something about Jensen, being a teammate.

              Jensen's family must look back on him with such strange mixed feelings. born into the garden but hit by lightning.
              Why you do this to me, Dimi?

              Comment


              • #52
                Averaged between 1927 and 1931

                Ruth: 51 HR, 155 RBI, 146 runs, 122 BB, .350 Avg, .722 Slg

                Gherig: 39 HR, 160 RBI, 144 runs, 108 BB, .353 Avg, .677 Slg

                So if that ain't the greatest, I don't know what is.

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                • #53
                  Lots of great ones mentioned so its hard to find some good others but for a season only, I'd like to throw in the 1884 Chicago White Stockings quartette of Williamson, Pfeffer, Dalrymple and Anson

                  The 4 of them hit over 20 hr's that year (the next closest was Brouthers with 14)

                  You can even throw in King Kelly who had 13 hr's and led the league with a .354 avg...

                  The 5 of them were the top 5 in the league in total bases, amassing 1229 total bases between the 5 of them....

                  Big #'s for that era....


                  Bench and Perez were nasty as well...
                  Last edited by Baseball Guru; 06-16-2004, 03:37 PM.
                  "There are three things in my life which I really love: God, my family, and baseball. The only problem - once baseball season starts, I change the order around a bit.
                  ~~Al Gallagher


                  God Bless America!

                  Click here to see my baseball tribute site!

                  Click here to see the best pitcher NOT in the HOF!

                  sigpic

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                  • #54
                    During the 50's the Red sox had an outfield of Ted Williams in left, Jim Piersall in center and Jackie Jensen in Right, not too bad.
                    Lets get Eddie Basinski elected to the Polish Sports Hall of Fame.
                    www.brooklyndodgermemories.com

                    Comment


                    • #55
                      fear and panic

                      that 1884 white stockings team, I say break them up! It's not fair to be better than everybody else. that's got to be the most dominant team of all time. what did they finish? 70-75?

                      and how could you tell if Piersall was in center or not?
                      Why you do this to me, Dimi?

                      Comment


                      • #56
                        Originally posted by ElHalo
                        Come on.

                        Ramirez and Garciaparra are great players, and I'd give each a better than 50/50 shot at one day making the Hall of Fame.

                        But David Ortiz? His most similar players are Brian Daubach, Luke Easter, Kevin Millar, and Joe Hauser. I don't even know if he's the third most feared Red Sock now. At least Mueller's won a batting title.

                        I'd hold off on the Ortiz accolades until he proves that he's as good as, say, Carl Everett.
                        Just curious if you want to change your statement?

                        Comment


                        • #57
                          Originally posted by BoSox Rule
                          Just curious if you want to change your statement?
                          Nope. Stick by it. Let him show that he's not Brady Anderson, and maybe I'll be impressed.
                          "Simply put, the passion, interest and tradition surrounding baseball in New York is unmatched."

                          Sean McAdam, ESPN.com

                          Comment


                          • #58
                            Originally posted by ElHalo
                            Nope. Stick by it. Let him show that he's not Brady Anderson, and maybe I'll be impressed.
                            So, 162 averages of 42 HR, 140 RBI, 50 doubles, for the last two years aren't good enough? Or a 2 year line of .295/.375/.597/.972? Or is it the fact that he is a better hitter than any player the Yankees have to offer?

                            But, hey why argue it? I'm not the one who thinks Greg Maddux is overrated, or the one comparing Ortiz to Anderson.
                            Last edited by BoSox Rule; 10-16-2004, 11:37 AM.

                            Comment


                            • #59
                              Originally posted by BoSox Rule
                              So, 162 averages of 42 HR, 140 RBI, 50 doubles, for the last two years aren't good enough? Or a 2 year line of .295/.375/.597/.972? Or is it the fact that he is a better hitter than any player the Yankees have to offer?

                              But, hey why argue it? I'm not the one who thinks Greg Maddux is overrated, or the one comparing Ortiz to Anderson.
                              Key part of that statement being "for the last two years."

                              Sure, he's been awesome with Boston. But I'm very, very skeptical that a guy who had the kind of career in Minnesota that Ortiz did can just all of the sudden jump out and be one of the best hitters in the league. The Anderson comment was meant to say that anybody can have a lucky couple of years (notice Anderson, with one 50 HR/20 SB season, one 20HR/50SB season, and nothing else remotely comparable to those two). I highly, highly, HIGHLY doubt whether Ortiz will be able to continue the torrid pace he's produced at the last couple of years...

                              In my guess, I'd expect something from Ortiz next year along the lines of .280/.350/.450, with 25 homers and 90 RBI's. Maybe I'll be wrong, and he's just busted out with Boston, and we can continue to see this kind of production from him.

                              But I doubt it. I'd love to be wrong, though.
                              "Simply put, the passion, interest and tradition surrounding baseball in New York is unmatched."

                              Sean McAdam, ESPN.com

                              Comment


                              • #60
                                The main problem for David Ortiz in Minnesota was turning on inside fastballs. Papa Jack (Red Sox hitting coach) worked on it with him and look at the results. Ortiz will continue this production for years, no doubt.

                                Comment

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