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Where do player nicknames come from?

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    Myankee4life
    Registered User

  • Myankee4life
    replied
    I think Yankee Clipper came from how smooth Dimaggio played so clipper is actually refering to a smooth sailing boat.

    Leave a comment:

  • Sultan_1895-1948
    Prince of Pounders

  • Sultan_1895-1948
    replied
    "Iron Horse" was apparently inpired by a train, as was "Big Train" from him pulling his team along with him.

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  • Sultan_1895-1948
    Prince of Pounders

  • Sultan_1895-1948
    replied
    Originally posted by Tigerfan1974
    How many??
    The Babe.
    The Bambino.
    The Sultan of Swat.

    Others?
    Babe - Veterans began calling him Dunnies Baby after two weeks in training camp. Fit the way he was seen by them; as just a child. George was far too formal for him. By the end of the third week of training, the Baltimore papers were referring to him as "Babe" Ruth and then the fans were, and soon everyone.

    Bambino - Brought about by immigrant fans who would talk about him on street corners, stores, and streetcars. The italian world for Babe was Bambino. It caught on, and soon papers were including it in their headlines with "Bam hits one." It fit.

    Jidge - Called this by his Yankee teammates; a variation of George. Apparently Dugan was the first to call him this.

    Home Run King - Referred to in print quite often. First time came after his 9th HR in 1918.

    Clouting Hercules
    Boston Battering Ram
    Big Bertha
    Behemoth of Bing
    Colossal of Clout
    Sultan of Swat
    Prince of Pound

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  • Brian McKenna
    Registered User

  • Brian McKenna
    replied
    my thought on nicknames is that we should throw away 90% of them - many were just newspaper nicknames that were mere fluff

    no friend or teammate ever used:
    three fingers brown
    daffy dean
    sultan of swat or a million others for ruth

    for example

    Leave a comment:

  • Captain Cold Nose
    OSHA-certified Moderator

  • Captain Cold Nose
    replied
    Originally posted by Tigerfan1974
    How many??
    The Babe.
    The Bambino.
    The Sultan of Swat.

    Others?
    I'm trying to remember all the names they had for him in The Sandlot. The Colossus of Clout was one. And, no, The Sandlot was not the first time I had heard of him.

    Leave a comment:

  • Tigerfan1974
    Registered User

  • Tigerfan1974
    replied
    Originally posted by Captain Cold Nose
    Sorry. There are oh so many . . .
    How many??
    The Babe.
    The Bambino.
    The Sultan of Swat.

    Others?

    Leave a comment:

  • Captain Cold Nose
    OSHA-certified Moderator

  • Captain Cold Nose
    replied
    Originally posted by Tigerfan1974
    Actually, I was referring to Sultan of Swat, and the like.
    I know that Babe was from Ruth's age at the time of the tag.
    Sorry. There are oh so many . . .

    Leave a comment:

  • Tigerfan1974
    Registered User

  • Tigerfan1974
    replied
    Originally posted by Captain Cold Nose
    Actually, Ruth's nickname supposedly came from a description someone gave him while playing for Jack Dunn's Baltimore minor league team. Someone said of him, "You better watch out for him. He's one of Jack Dunn's babes," or something to that efect, alluding to Ruth being one of the young players on the team.

    Sal Maglie was the Barber because he threw inside.

    Ted Williams was The Splendid Splinter because he was thin as a rail when he was starting off.
    Actually, I was referring to Sultan of Swat, and the like.
    I know that Babe was from Ruth's age at the time of the tag.

    Leave a comment:

  • Brian McKenna
    Registered User

  • Brian McKenna
    replied
    heard that denton true young practiced against a fence of something and tore it apart with his pitches - someone noted that it looked like a cyclone went through here

    the dots miller story is a good one

    rube and dummy are common and self explanatory but rube foster is said to have gotten his nickname after defeating rube waddell in an exhibition contest

    dummy murphy is the only dummy i've found that wasn't deaf

    many nicknames come from pop culture - back in the 1950s if you looked or moved or whatever like marciano your nickname might be rocky

    Leave a comment:

  • Captain Cold Nose
    OSHA-certified Moderator

  • Captain Cold Nose
    replied
    Actually, Ruth's nickname supposedly came from a description someone gave him while playing for Jack Dunn's Baltimore minor league team. Someone said of him, "You better watch out for him. He's one of Jack Dunn's babes," or something to that efect, alluding to Ruth being one of the young players on the team.

    Sal Maglie was the Barber because he threw inside.

    Ted Williams was The Splendid Splinter because he was thin as a rail when he was starting off.

    Leave a comment:

  • Tigerfan1974
    Registered User

  • Tigerfan1974
    started a topic Where do player nicknames come from?

    Where do player nicknames come from?

    Where do they come from? Which ones are the best?

    Obviously Ruth's nicknames came from his power hitting.
    Cobb was from Georgia, hence Georgia Peach.
    Jackson was good in the post-season, Mr. October.

    What about the Yankee Clipper?
    Why is Rizzuto the Scooter?

    What about the Barber?
    The Newc? (Don Newcombe?)
    The Thumper?
    The Bachelor?

    What are some others? Who were they and where did the name come from?
    Inquiring mind wants to know??

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