Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

The Federal League

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Chadwick
    replied
    Regarding the PCL idea, the nation's transportation infrastructure wasn't capable of making a combined league a reality, but the Federal League might have stood a chance if they were in cahoots with the Pacific Coast League in terms of arranging a "World Series" of their own. That would have been extremely viable in terms of criss-crossing the country at the end of the regular season. It might also have been beneficial for the two leagues to send a trainful of "all stars" across the nation's railways during the winter months to raise awareness/popularity and increase demand for a truly "national" baseball organization, a FL-PCL mix. What might have come of it? Who knows. But at least there was the possibility that a larger number of regions would have "major league" teams of their own to root for half a century before those dreams began to be realized.

    I don't really have any thoughts of my own to add to the discussion here, but I just wanted to post a big 'THANK YOU' for the very informative and enjoyable posts in this thread. Yet another example of the abundance of knowledge, intelligence and passion that make BBF the most vibrant, rich baseball resource on the web!

    Leave a comment:


  • THE OX
    replied
    Frisco might have had a hard time supporting a Major League baseball team just 8 or 9 years after the Earthquake of 1906.........

    Leave a comment:


  • Brian McKenna
    replied
    Interesting article in the latest SABR National Pastime about the Federal League's reserve clause. Though they railed against it in the media and in the courts, it was there plain as day in their own contracts.

    Leave a comment:


  • Brian McKenna
    replied
    Early list of Federal League backers - from December 1913:
    Attached Files

    Leave a comment:


  • Bill Burgess
    replied
    James A. Gilmore (St. Louis) / Charles A. Weeghman (Chicago)
    Last edited by Bill Burgess; 05-30-2010, 06:58 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • LeoD
    replied


    Brooklyn Federal League baseball player Lafitte- 1914
    Last edited by LeoD; 12-24-2007, 05:21 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • LeoD
    replied


    Federal League's Chicago Whales baseball team riding in an automobile covered with banners and light colored decorations in an auto parade in Chicago, Illinois. 1915
    Last edited by LeoD; 12-24-2007, 05:14 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bill Burgess
    replied
    1914 Federal League Owners/Executives: (Bain Collection)

    Top Row: L-R: Charles A. Weeghman (Chicago Whales), Walter Ward (Brooklyn Tip Tops)(nephew of Robert Boyd Ward), C. B. Comstock (architect).

    Middle Row: L-R: L. Edwin Goldman (Baltimore director), Robert Boyd Ward (Brooklyn Tip Tops), Edward A. Steininger (St. Louis), James Gilmore (St. Louis Terriers), George Ward, Schleunes, William M. Walker (Chicago Whales), William Robertson (Buffalo Buffeds/Blues).

    Bottom Row: L-R: J. Ed Krause (Indianapolis Hoosiers), Philip De Catesby Ball (St. Louis Terriers), Harry Goldman (Baltimore), Walter Mullen (Buffalo Buffeds/Blues), Rickart, Ned Hanlon (Baltimore Terrapins), Edward E. Gates (St. Louis Terriers/legal counsel), George Carroll.


    1912: Marshal Henderson (Pittsburgh co-owner), William T. Murphy (Cleveland owner), Ambrose Hussey Jr. (Brooklyn co-owner), William A. Witman (first league president and owner, Reading); Ernest C. Landgraf (co-owner, Richmond); John J. Ryan (co-owner Cincinnati); Hugh Mckinnon (co-owner, Cincinnati); Ambrose Hussey Sr. (co-owner Brooklyn).

    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------unidentified, Charles Weegham, Ned Hanlon, W.M Walker, Edward Gates, Seated bottom, James Gilmore.

    Top, middle: Ned Hanlon. Bottom, left: Charlie Weeghman---Charlie Weeghman---Charlie Weeghman




    Last edited by Bill Burgess; 12-02-2011, 12:28 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Brian McKenna
    replied
    Originally posted by Fuzzy Bear View Post
    Would coast to coast baseball have made it in 1914-15?
    I think airline travel and television were prerequites for a successful bicoastal league. I'm not sure it could have happened much earlier than it actually did.

    Leave a comment:


  • Ubiquitous
    replied
    There is no way any city on the west coast would have been a viable option in 1915 regardless of how many people were.

    The travel time and cost would have been too daunting. In 1937 if you left Chicago on Sunday you got to LA on Wednesday.

    In 1910 LA had 411,000 inhabitants, SF had 416,000.

    In 1920 LA had 936,000, SF had 506,000.
    Last edited by Ubiquitous; 12-05-2007, 09:28 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • EdTarbusz
    replied
    Would LA have have been a viable Major League city in 1915? SF probably would have, but I think there would have been cities between Chicago and SF to make it viable, and I don't know if any cities would have qualified in that era.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bill Burgess
    replied
    That might have been an interesting strategy. It might have sought to combine with the Pacific League. Or Coast L.?

    Might have broken things open much earlier.

    Leave a comment:


  • Fuzzy Bear
    replied
    What would have happened if the Federal League had a different lineup of cities? For example:

    New York
    Baltimore
    Chicago
    Los Angeles
    San Francisco
    Buffalo
    Minneapolis
    Milwaukee

    Would coast to coast baseball have made it in 1914-15?

    Leave a comment:


  • Brian McKenna
    replied
    Article about Robert Ward's financial losses resulting from the FL:
    Attached Files

    Leave a comment:


  • Brian McKenna
    replied
    With the ending of the FL war professional baseball players lost their brief negotiating strength. Many had signed multi-year contracts and even more had gained sizable raises. This was despite the fact that AL and NL franchises' income was down due to the attendance war with the FL.

    Franchises:
    -all ML and many minor league franchises were injured in the war, particularly those in FL cities
    -Jack Dunn in Baltimore had to relocate during war and was forced to prematurely sell off some players, such as, a young, recently-acquired George Ruth
    -even though there was no FL franchise in Philadelphia, Connie Mack moved to dismantle his club. The A's had recently won four pennants in 5 years and his players were seeing other ML stars cash in. Rather than pay out huge salaries, Mack either released, sold or traded away his stars. The A's would rise out of last place until 1922.
    -The Red Sox were one to pay huge salaries - with many 2-year deals to boot. This eventually led to Lannin selling out to Frazee

    Players:
    -The players enjoyed a strong, yet brief, advantage in contract negotiations. When the FL disbanded, the boot fell hard on the players. Salaries were cut back (some dramatically), as were the multi-year deals.

    A war was also raging in Europe which would eventually lead to the shortening of the 1917 and 1918 seasons - shortening of paychecks and tempers as well.

    Leave a comment:

Ad Widget

Collapse
Working...
X