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  • Sultan_1895-1948
    replied
    Originally posted by west coast orange and black
    totally agree that 18 hits is a boatload.
    and totally agree that chances are slim.

    but get a non-slugging player dediacted to reaching base on a hit, and it could happen if the circumstances were right.

    what if ichiro played for the coloradans and was not tempted to slug away in that rarified air?
    that's a big ballyard. lots of stuff would fall. plus, he is such a threat with bunting and infield hits.
    That there's the only recipe I see for it happening.

    1. A left handed batter
    2. A left handed batter who puts the ball in play a lot
    3. A left handed batter who puts the ball in play a lot, and hits to all fields
    4. A left handed batter who puts the ball in play a lot, hits to all fields, and has speed.
    5. Same as 4, but add IN COLORADO, and he doesn't try to go yard.

    Ya know, WC, if your boy would take what's given to him, he could have gotten a ton of cheapies. Not what he was getting paid for, but just 2 or 3 of those a week would do a lot, and might eventually open up the right side more.

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  • SHOELESSJOE3
    replied
    Originally posted by west coast orange and black
    totally agree that 18 hits is a boatload.
    and totally agree that chances are slim.

    but get a non-slugging player dediacted to reaching base on a hit, and it could happen if the circumstances were right.

    what if ichiro played for the coloradans and was not tempted to slug away in that rarified air?
    that's a big ballyard. lots of stuff would fall. plus, he is such a threat with bunting and infield hits.
    He's the guy that I have in mind, the one that seems to have the tools, the type to hit .400.

    Leave a comment:


  • west coast orange and black
    replied
    totally agree that 18 hits is a boatload.
    and totally agree that chances are slim.

    but get a non-slugging player dediacted to reaching base on a hit, and it could happen if the circumstances were right.

    what if ichiro played for the coloradans and was not tempted to slug away in that rarified air?
    that's a big ballyard. lots of stuff would fall. plus, he is such a threat with bunting and infield hits.

    Leave a comment:


  • SHOELESSJOE3
    replied
    Originally posted by west coast orange and black
    reaching .430 is not as impossible as it seems.

    george brett needed 18 additional hits in 1980 to tack 40 more points to his .390 (3 stinkin' hits each month), and tony gwynn's .394 in 1993 would'a been .430 with but 16 more hits.
    so, "a scratch single" here, "just under the glove" there...

    we don't see the likes of gwynn and brett very often, though.
    18 More hits may not seem like a lot to some, but it is. Same with 16 more hits.

    I'll go with that, .430 is not as impossible as it seems, but in my view, it's a long, long shot. Real long.

    There has not even been a .400 hitter for 64 seasons.
    There has been only 4 hitters in the last 64 seasons that hit for better than .379 and one of them was Ted Williams in 1941.

    Never say never, but even a .400 hitter looks like a long shot today. Most important, the long ball is in today with the majority of hitters, tons of strikeouts, far less contact than years ago. Result, a smaller pool than ever of contact hitters, the guys that have a shot at .400.

    I would love to see someone chase .400, you can never tell. That would be some real excitement. I love the long ball but high numbers seem so common the last decade, it lost some of the shine.

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  • Sultan_1895-1948
    replied
    Originally posted by Appling
    I thought I might compare some JD stats during the 56-game streak with his stats for the remainder of that 1941 season.
    DiMaggio - 1941 season
    Stat: Streak/other/season
    Games: 56 / 83 / 139
    At-Bat: 223/ 318/ 541
    AB/Game:3.98/3.83/3.89
    Home R: 15/ 15/ 30
    AB/HR: 14.9/21.2/ 18.0
    Hits: 91 /102 /193
    Hits/G: 1.63/ 1.23/ 1.39
    R-B-I: 55/ 70/ 125
    RBI/G: 0.93/0.84/0.90

    Interesting that half of Joe's 30 homeruns that season were during the streak.
    His HR rate of 14.9 AB/HR in the streak was better than for "other" (21.2).
    As expected, he averaged more hits per game during the streak (1.63) than other (1.23).
    Obviously his average hits per game was higher during the streak (1.63) than in his other 83 games (1.23).

    To my surprise, however, his AB/G was very nearly the same for the streak (3.98) as in his other games (3.83).
    So his hitting streak was due to better contact and more power, not simply more AB per game during the streak.

    By contrast, Ted Williams in that same season averaged only 3.19 AB per game.
    Despite his higher BA (.406 for the season) Ted had only 185 hits in 143 games, an average of 1.29 hits per game -- about the same as Joe's average hits/game in the "other 83 games".
    During the streak, Joe had seven games in which he went for 1-for-5, while Ted would rarely have 5 official at-bats in a game.
    When you're goin' good, you're goin' good.

    Leave a comment:


  • Appling
    replied
    I thought I might compare some Joe D stats during the 56-game streak with his stats for the remainder of that 1941 season.
    DiMaggio - 1941 season
    Stat: Streak/other/season
    Games: 56 / 83 / 139
    At-Bat: 223/ 318/ 541
    AB/Game:3.98/3.83/3.89
    Home R: 15/ 15/ 30
    AB/HR: 14.9/21.2/ 18.0
    Hits: 91 /102 /193
    Hits/G: 1.63/ 1.23/ 1.39
    R-B-I: 55/ 70/ 125
    RBI/G: 0.93/0.84/0.90

    Interesting that half of Joe's 30 homeruns that season were during the streak.
    His HR rate of 14.9 AB/HR in the streak was better than for "other" (21.2).
    As expected, he averaged more hits per game during the streak (1.63) than other (1.23).
    Obviously his average hits per game was higher during the streak (1.63) than in his other 83 games (1.23).

    To my surprise, however, his AB/G was very nearly the same for the streak (3.98) as in his other games (3.83).
    So his hitting streak was due to better contact and more power, not simply more AB per game during the streak.

    By contrast, Ted Williams in that same season averaged only 3.19 AB per game.
    Despite his higher BA (.406 for the season) Ted had only 185 hits in 143 games, an average of 1.29 hits per game -- about the same as Joe's average hits/game in his "other 83 games".

    During the streak, Joe had seven games in which he went for 1-for-5, while Ted would rarely have 5 official at-bats in a game.
    Last edited by Appling; 02-17-2006, 01:59 PM.

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  • Sultan_1895-1948
    replied
    Originally posted by Appling
    Maybe not. A guy could hit over .400 during a hot spell and maintain a hitting streak -- getting lots of AB in each game -- then get injured and finish the season with barely enough PA to qualify for the batting crown.

    Or maybe his hitting streak earns so much respect that he then gets lots of walks (ala Berry Bonds).
    The injury scenario you mention could happen and would probably have to happen for it to happen.

    The point is, that to break the streak, the hitter has to be a certain kind of hitter. His approach has to be unique, and his ability has to be unique. To not take walks, but to make solid contact enough to have a chance at the streak, very difficult.

    A hitter isn't going to suddenly change his approach once a streak his over. DiMaggio went on to hit in 17 more straight games after the streak. In most cases, walks aren't dished out by pitchers, they are taken by hitters, if that makes sense. It's all about the hitters approach. The hitter who breaks the steak isn't going to be a big lumbering slugger anyway, so they'll be no intentional passes "a la Bonds, or a la Ruth". So even after the streak ends, he'll end up with a ton of AB for the season, lowering the odds of him maintaining .400.

    It just won't happen imo, unless EVERYTHING happens perfectly in that injury scenario you laid out.

    Leave a comment:


  • west coast orange and black
    replied
    reaching .430 is not as impossible as it seems.

    george brett needed 18 additional hits in 1980 to tack 40 more points to his .390 (3 stinkin' hits each month), and tony gwynn's .394 in 1993 would'a been .430 with but 16 more hits.
    so, "a scratch single" here, "just under the glove" there...

    we don't see the likes of gwynn and brett very often, though.

    Leave a comment:


  • Appling
    replied
    Originally posted by Sultan_1895-1948
    That's actually very unlikely. In order to get the streak, it's gonna have to be a hitter that doesn't take a lot of walks, and puts the ball in play. If that same hitter doesn't walk a lot, he'll have a high number of AB over the course of the entire season, and his chances for ending up with a high average are very slim.
    Maybe not. A guy could hit over .400 during a hot spell and maintain a hitting streak -- getting lots of AB in each game -- then get injured and finish the season with barely enough PA to qualify for the batting crown.

    Or maybe his hitting streak earns so much respect that he then gets lots of walks (ala Berry Bonds).

    Leave a comment:


  • Appling
    replied
    Originally posted by KCGHOST
    I went with the .430 because it is so far off the chart.
    It's only four point better than Lajoie did in 1901.

    Leave a comment:


  • west coast orange and black
    replied
    i went with a triple crown season. 2 of the 3 legs are "individual" achievements.

    75 ding dongs would merely arouse suspicion, even if it was the angelic pujols.
    195 rbi has much to do with the team being an incredible machine.
    batting .430 would be an amzing achievement, but anticlimatic. now, sittin' on .399 going into the final game is another matter.

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  • mlazar
    replied
    I believe the biggest excitement would be after Jason Kendall belts his 76th home run the final game of 2006, keeping Jonny Gomes from winning the Triple Crown after a monster year of .430, 75 Hr's, 195 rbi's...

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  • Blackout
    replied
    .406 actually

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  • KCGHOST
    replied
    I went with the .430 because it is so far off the chart.

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  • KHenry14
    replied
    I voted for the triple crown only because I think that's the only one that's likely to happen.

    KH14

    Leave a comment:

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