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Best Hitter of the 1970's?

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  • #16
    1. Rod Carew
    2. Pete Rose
    3. Reggie Jackson
    4. Joe Morgan
    5. Willie Stargell
    ?

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    • #17
      1. Willie Stargell
      2. Reggie Jackson
      3. Joe Morgan
      4. Rod Carew
      5. Reggie Smith
      "It is a simple matter to erect a Hall of Fame, but difficult to select the tenants." -- Ken Smith
      "I am led to suspect that some of the electorate is very dumb." -- Henry P. Edwards
      "You have a Hall of Fame to put people in, not keep people out." -- Brian Kenny
      "There's no such thing as a perfect ballot." -- Jay Jaffe

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Chadwick View Post
        1. Willie Stargell
        2. Reggie Jackson
        3. Joe Morgan
        4. Rod Carew
        5. Reggie Smith
        Solid choice

        good on every team that he was on
        This week's Giant

        #5 in games played as a Giant with 1721 , Bill Terry

        Comment


        • #19
          Greatest hitter doesn't mean what it used to.
          "No matter how great you were once upon a time — the years go by, and men forget,” - W. A. Phelon in Baseball Magazine in 1915. “Ross Barnes, forty years ago, was as great as Cobb or Wagner ever dared to be. Had scores been kept then as now, he would have seemed incomparably marvelous.”

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          • #20
            1. Steve Garvey
            2. Jim Rice
            3. Greg Luzinski
            4. George Foster
            5. Lou Brock
            Last edited by willshad; 07-13-2018, 10:12 AM.

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            • #21
              Most Batting Runs 1970-79, minimum OPS+ of 131:
              Code:
              Rk         Player  Rbat OPS+ BtWins   RC   PA   Age   BA  OBP  SLG
              1  Reggie Jackson 311.0  148   33.3  960 5913 24-33 .275 .363 .508
              2      Joe Morgan 310.9  140   34.4 1106 6320 26-35 .282 .404 .455
              3 Willie Stargell 298.5  156   33.8  930 5083 30-39 .287 .374 .555
              4       Rod Carew 295.2  142   31.2  985 5916 24-33 .343 .408 .454
              5   Ken Singleton 266.6  139   29.7  889 5778 23-32 .289 .398 .447
              6     Bobby Bonds 246.1  133   25.5 1022 6561 24-33 .274 .357 .483
              7    Reggie Smith 241.6  142   27.8  897 5352 25-34 .292 .374 .507
              8     Gene Tenace 224.1  137   23.1  680 4654 23-32 .245 .386 .432
              9    Johnny Bench 214.2  132   22.8  899 6006 22-31 .267 .349 .491
              10   Mike Schmidt 212.6  141   22.3  758 4506 22-29 .255 .374 .511
              Si quaeris peninsulam amoenam, circumspice.

              Comprehensive Reform for the Veterans Committee -- Fixing the Hall continued.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by bluesky5 View Post
                Greatest hitter doesn't mean what it used to.
                Baseball Digest used to have an annual managers poll that included a vote on best hitter. It would be interesting to try to go back and compile those leaders for the 70s.

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by Freakshow View Post
                  Most Batting Runs 1970-79, minimum OPS+ of 131:
                  Code:
                  Rk Player Rbat OPS+ BtWins RC PA Age BA OBP SLG
                  1 Reggie Jackson 311.0 148 33.3 960 5913 24-33 .275 .363 .508
                  2 Joe Morgan 310.9 140 34.4 1106 6320 26-35 .282 .404 .455
                  3 Willie Stargell 298.5 156 33.8 930 5083 30-39 .287 .374 .555
                  4 Rod Carew 295.2 142 31.2 985 5916 24-33 .343 .408 .454
                  5 Ken Singleton 266.6 139 29.7 889 5778 23-32 .289 .398 .447
                  6 Bobby Bonds 246.1 133 25.5 1022 6561 24-33 .274 .357 .483
                  7 Reggie Smith 241.6 142 27.8 897 5352 25-34 .292 .374 .507
                  8 Gene Tenace 224.1 137 23.1 680 4654 23-32 .245 .386 .432
                  9 Johnny Bench 214.2 132 22.8 899 6006 22-31 .267 .349 .491
                  10 Mike Schmidt 212.6 141 22.3 758 4506 22-29 .255 .374 .511
                  Ken Singleton is almost criminally underrated or forgotten at least. Every other player here got some mention.

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by PVNICK View Post

                    Ken Singleton is almost criminally underrated or forgotten at least. Every other player here got some mention.
                    I mentioned him and picked number 9 in post #3.

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by NJRob65 View Post

                      I mentioned him and picked number 9 in post #3.
                      Whoops. Then again, you usually are more data oriented. Was he on your mind as a possibility before you ran thw numbers ?

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by brett View Post

                        Baseball Digest used to have an annual managers poll that included a vote on best hitter. It would be interesting to try to go back and compile those leaders for the 70s.
                        I feel like there are serious discrepancies between the guys being listed here and the guys who would have been listed 8-10 years ago. Let alone in the 1970's. Rod Carew & Pete Rose are hardly topping lists. Rose is barely making it.

                        Edit: I was trying to address in a roundabout way: are we gonna address this or what? It's a pretty big deal. You guys can't tell me you don't know exactly what I'm talking about and that you didn't notice it immediately.
                        Last edited by bluesky5; 07-13-2018, 10:25 PM.
                        "No matter how great you were once upon a time — the years go by, and men forget,” - W. A. Phelon in Baseball Magazine in 1915. “Ross Barnes, forty years ago, was as great as Cobb or Wagner ever dared to be. Had scores been kept then as now, he would have seemed incomparably marvelous.”

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Originally posted by bluesky5 View Post

                          I feel like there are serious discrepancies between the guys being listed here and the guys who would have been listed 8-10 years ago. Let alone in the 1970's. Rod Carew & Pete Rose are hardly topping lists. Rose is barely making it.

                          Edit: I was trying to address in a roundabout way: are we gonna address this or what? It's a pretty big deal. You guys can't tell me you don't know exactly what I'm talking about and that you didn't notice it immediately.
                          It is good that you have picked up on that point. One of the beauties of baseball is that hitting stats are reflected in reverse within pitching stats. When we discuss the batting styles of the 1970s hitters, those styles were dictated by 1) hitting coaches' from minor leagues up to the majors, and 2) the elite pitchers of the 1970s. Contact hitters prevailed not only in the 70s, but over time in most decades leading up to then, for most hitters and hitting coaches' minds, IMO. In other words, the players wanted to hit the best pitchers, and worked to do well against Seaver, Carlton, Palmer, Catfish, G Perry or any other dominant pitcher of the time. The major requirement for that was contact hitting, and all anyone had to do was to point to Dave Kingman or even the disappointing career of Bobby Bonds for support.

                          Hitters who made an uppercut the basis of their style would only find a roster spot on losing teams, and would lose their place in the lineup midway through a major slump. The process was Darwinian...... adapt or die.

                          Now, we have a new prevailing mantra, a whole new paradigm for what the hitters were supposed to be doing all along. Honestly, it is ridiculous. The laws of physics haven't changed. What has changed is the presence of player agents brainwashing players into short-term timeframes to gain a short-term heist on a contract. Players used to attempt to stick around for 10-15 years, and it seems like a lot of players are trying to make their hay within 5-7 years and then who would care after that? So, swing for the fences. (????) No one cares to remember the career path of Dan Uggla.

                          IMO, Uggla would have started at 2B for the Padres in the 1970s through age 30 at best, and then lost his spot in 1975 in some trade for a defensive improvement, and been unable to win his spot back even if the defensive improvement had an injury.

                          The whole matter is ridiculous, really.

                          The 1970s were not all that enlightened. Fans and media did not understand Garvey's limitations, and did not appreciate Gene Tenace. But we knew a hitter from a glorified softball player.
                          Catfish Hunter, RIP. Mark Fidrych, RIP. Skip Caray, RIP. Tony Gwynn, #19, RIP

                          A fanatic is someone who can't change his mind and won't change the subject. -- Winston Churchill. (Please take note that I've recently become aware of how this quote applies to a certain US president. This is a coincidence, and the quote was first added to this signature too far back to remember when).

                          Experience is the hardest teacher. She gives the test first and the lesson later. -- Dan Quisenberry.

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by abolishthedh View Post


                            The 1970s were not all that enlightened. Fans and media did not understand Garvey's limitations, and did not appreciate Gene Tenace. But we knew a hitter from a glorified softball player.
                            Yes Garvey should have chastised for all those hits, RBI, durability, post season heroics , and team success.


                            The process was Darwinian...... adapt or die.
                            good pioint

                            a lot of modern players do base their hitting style on Bobby Darwin
                            Last edited by JR Hart; 07-14-2018, 10:21 AM.
                            This week's Giant

                            #5 in games played as a Giant with 1721 , Bill Terry

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              I find it amazing that so few guys hit for both power and average back then. If I'm not mistaken, only three times in the entire decade did someone hit 40 HRs and bat .300? Aaron, Rice, and Foster (and Aaron and Rice had huge home fields advantages to help them out). I think we may be headed for another situation like this.

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Originally posted by willshad View Post
                                I find it amazing that so few guys hit for both power and average back then. If I'm not mistaken, only three times in the entire decade did someone hit 40 HRs and bat .300? Aaron, Rice, and Foster (and Aaron and Rice had huge home fields advantages to help them out). I think we may be headed for another situation like this.
                                I think the reason for that is because the game in that era was very balanced in term of hitting vs pitching, unlike the 1900's or 1930's or the late 1960's or the late 1990's where one side of the ball dominated. I think of of this way. What if today baseball contracted down to 6-8 teams? Each team would have so much top talent and depth that no one could dominate or stand out. Even the elite hitters and pitches would see their numbers dragged down towards the league average. This is kind of what happened in the 1970's IMO.
                                Strikeouts are boring! Besides that, they're fascist. Throw some ground balls - it's more democratic.-Crash Davis

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