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Forgotten Great Seasons

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  • Forgotten Great Seasons

    I've never before seen anybody here mention the name George Derby. IMO he was the best pitcher in baseball for the 1881 season. He went 29-26 that season for the Detroit Wolverines in the National League. He led the league with 9 shutouts and with 212 strikeouts. He threw 494.2 innings with a 2.20 ERA and an ERA+ of 132. He also led the league in pitching WAR.

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    19th Century League Champion
    1900s League Champion
    1910s League Champion

    1930s League Division Winner
    1950s League Champion
    1960 Strat-O-Matic League Regular Season Winner
    1960s League Division Winner
    1970s League Champion
    1971 Strat-O-Matic League Runner Up
    1980s League Champion
    All Time Greats League Champion

  • #2
    Another forgotten great season is 1889 Jesse Duryea. He was the best pitcher in the AA that year IMO. He went 32-19 with an ERA of 2.56 and an ERA+ of 153. He had 401 innings pitched.
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    19th Century League Champion
    1900s League Champion
    1910s League Champion

    1930s League Division Winner
    1950s League Champion
    1960 Strat-O-Matic League Regular Season Winner
    1960s League Division Winner
    1970s League Champion
    1971 Strat-O-Matic League Runner Up
    1980s League Champion
    All Time Greats League Champion

    Comment


    • #3
      Ok... um... Rico Petrocelli putting up 10 bWAR/7.8 WAA in 1969, just a year after his teammate Carl Yastrzemski had done so two years in a row (inc. the Year of the Pitcher). Didn't lead the league in any major categories that year except for total bWAR, but there's ton of "gray ink" across the board with both counting and saber stats. Probably the biggest bright spot on that Red Sox team, but he had to have been overshadowed massively by the return of Tony C (who had a fine offensive himself coming off the brutal injury he suffered, but his WAR numbers that year were way down due to atrocious defense).

      Comment


      • #4
        1906 George Stone led the AL in all three slash categories at ..358/.417/.501, and in OPS+ at 195 playing for the Browns.
        .


        19th Century League Champion
        1900s League Champion
        1910s League Champion

        1930s League Division Winner
        1950s League Champion
        1960 Strat-O-Matic League Regular Season Winner
        1960s League Division Winner
        1970s League Champion
        1971 Strat-O-Matic League Runner Up
        1980s League Champion
        All Time Greats League Champion

        Comment


        • #5
          1896 Hughie Jennings hit .401 and was hit by a record 51 pitches (sorry Ron Hunt) while scoring 125 runs and driving in 121 runs without hitting any home runs. He was also an awesome fielder at SS at the time, the best player in baseball from 1895 through 1898.

          There's only been one other season where a player had 100 or more RBIs without hitting any home runs.

          .


          19th Century League Champion
          1900s League Champion
          1910s League Champion

          1930s League Division Winner
          1950s League Champion
          1960 Strat-O-Matic League Regular Season Winner
          1960s League Division Winner
          1970s League Champion
          1971 Strat-O-Matic League Runner Up
          1980s League Champion
          All Time Greats League Champion

          Comment


          • #6
            Pud Galvin is never mentioned when talking about all time great pitching seasons. But in 1884 he won 46 of his teams 64 wins, and pitched 636 innings to a 1.99 ERA. It remains the only 20 WAR season in history.

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            • #7
              ^Tim Keefe was very close to joining Galvin, with 19.8 bWAR in 1883. (His WAA, 16.8, was higher than Galvin's 16.0 in 1884.)

              Comment


              • #8
                Jack Coombs 1910 - 31-9 W-L, 1.30 ERA/182 ERA+, 353 IP, 224 K. 3 World Series victories for winning Philadelphia A's squad. Leader with 12.9 B-G WAR, 9.5 B-R.
                Russ Ford - 1910 - 26-6 W-L, 1.65 ERA/160 ERA+, 300 IP, 209K. 11.8 B-R WAR, 11.5 B-G. Greatest Yankee season no one talks about.
                Reb Russell - 1913 - 22-16 W-L, 1.90 ERA/154 ERA+, 317 IP, 122K. 9.7 B-G WAR, 9.1 B-R.
                Jim Bagby - 1920 - 31-12 W-L, 2.89 ERA/133 ERA+, 340 IP, 73K. 1.80 ERA in 15 IP for world champion Indians. 9.9 B-G WAR, 8.9 B-R.
                Teddy Higuera - 1986 - 20-11 W-L, 2.79 ERA/156 ERA+, 248 IP, 207 K. 9.4 B-R WAR, 8.5 B-G.
                Jose Rijo - 1993 - 14-9 W-L, 2.48 ERA/162 ERA+, 257 IP, 227K. 10.1 B-R WAR, 9.7 B-G.
                Last edited by Jar of Flies; 09-15-2018, 02:03 PM.
                Jacquelyn Eva Marchand (1983-2017)
                http://www.tezakfuneralhome.com/noti...uelyn-Marchand

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                • #9
                  1918 Scott Perry of the Athletics. He went 20-18 for a last place team, leading the league in innings, starts and complete games. He had a 1.98 ERA and an ERA+ of 148.
                  .


                  19th Century League Champion
                  1900s League Champion
                  1910s League Champion

                  1930s League Division Winner
                  1950s League Champion
                  1960 Strat-O-Matic League Regular Season Winner
                  1960s League Division Winner
                  1970s League Champion
                  1971 Strat-O-Matic League Runner Up
                  1980s League Champion
                  All Time Greats League Champion

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Charlie Sweeney 1884
                    “There can be no higher law in journalism than to tell the truth and to shame the devil.” Walter Lippmann

                    "I don't care if the guy is yellow or black, or if he has stripes like a ******* zebra. I'm the manager of this team and I say he [Robinson] plays." - Leo Durocher

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                    • #11
                      Pete Alexander 1920. 27-14/ 1.91/ 173K for his 4th and final pitcher's triple crown. It was done for a team that went 75-79. His WAR was a career best at 12.0.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by morpheus1776 View Post
                        Pete Alexander 1920. 27-14/ 1.91/ 173K for his 4th and final pitcher's triple crown. It was done for a team that went 75-79. His WAR was a career best at 12.0.
                        Imagine if he was playing for the Giants, Indians, Yankees, White Sox or Brooklyn. Could have pushed 40 wins.

                        Edit: Looking at his numbers I noticed he only had one season with less complete games than wins. His penultimate year he was 9-8 with 8 CG for the '29 Cardinals. His final season was 1930 with the Phillies. He went 0-3 in 9 games, 3 starts and threw no complete games.
                        Last edited by bluesky5; 09-24-2018, 02:31 PM.
                        "No matter how great you were once upon a time — the years go by, and men forget,” - W. A. Phelon in Baseball Magazine in 1915. “Ross Barnes, forty years ago, was as great as Cobb or Wagner ever dared to be. Had scores been kept then as now, he would have seemed incomparably marvelous.”

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                        • #13
                          Deadball era had some crazy pitching stats but I will go with Mickey Lolich in 1971. 25-14 with 308 K's and a 2.92 era.

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                          • #14
                            Great Forgotten Seasons: Don Hurst - Lefthanded hitting and throwing first baseman - 1932 Philadelphia Phillies.
                            In 1932, Semi-obscure and mostly forgotten today, Phillies first baseman, Don Hurst led the National League in RBI with 143 and hit .339 with 24 home runs and a .547 slugging pctg. He stole some of the thunder from Phillies HOF outfielder Chuck Klein, a .320 lifetime hitter. Klein was league runner-up in RBI with 137, but led the league in home runs and hits and hit a blistering .348.. It was significant because the 1932 Phils were the only Phillies team in the 31 season span between 1918 and 1948 to finish over .500 and just barely at that at 78-76. After the Phillies had lost the 1915 World Series to the Boston Red Sox they were still good for a couple of years, but fell under .500 for the first time in a while in 1918. The team then had 14 straight losing seasons before the 1932 squad finished slightly over .500, but then the Phils reeled off another 16 straight under .500 finished including many cellar-dweller performances. The Phillies had six regulars who hit over .300 in 1932 (Hurst, Klein, C- Spud Davis, SS- Dick Bartell, a starter for the National League in next year's inaugural all-star game along with Klein, and outfielders Kiddo Davis and Hal Lee, plus 3B - Pinky Whitney hit .298). Second baseman was the only weak spot for the Phils with two players Les Mallon and Barney Freiburg combining to hit .254. On the negative side, this Phillies team had one of the majors' weakest pitching staffs and that balanced out the team, with no pitcher winning more than 14 games and six starters combining for a 70-65 record, with high earned run averages. No doubt the potent Phillies lineup bailed out many mediocre pitching performances, hence the Phillies finished at just over .500 and the team had to win their season finale to remain above .500. Without Hurst's unexpectedly great season, however, it would have been 31 straight losing seasons for the hapless Phils of the 20's through '40s. The team that would become known as the Whiz Kids to win the 1950, the NL pennant winner, benefited from a surge of young players who were starting to peak in 1949, to achieve their first over .500 finish since 1932. The 1949 Phillies were only 54-57 through August 15, but they served notice on the rest of the NL that they were about to arrive by going 27-16 at year's end, riding a nice surge to a 81-73, third-place finish.
                            Hurst spent 6 1/2 of his 7 MLB seasons as a Philie (1928-1934) topping .300 four times, topping 20 Home runs twice, topping 100 RBI twice, leading NLfirst basemen in fielding percentage once, and hitting .298 lifetime. His great 1932 season occurred when he was 26 years old, but he played his final major league game shortly before his 29th birthday. He passed away in Los Angeles in 1952 at age 47.
                            Last edited by philliesfiend55; 09-25-2018, 11:05 AM.

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                            • #15
                              Ok, technically this is spread over two season. Eric Davis had a 162 game stretch (started 152 games) from June 11, 1986 and ending July 4, 1987 where he hit .308/.406/.622 with 47 homers, 149 runs, 123 RBIs and 98 stolen bases. That's just short of a 50/100 season!
                              Strikeouts are boring! Besides that, they're fascist. Throw some ground balls - it's more democratic.-Crash Davis

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